Rasa Jala Nidhi, vol 3: Metals, Gems and other substances

by Bhudeb Mookerjee | 1938 | 47,185 words | ISBN-10: 8170305829 | ISBN-13: 9788170305828

This third volume of the Rasa-jala-nidhi deals with purification techniques of the Seven Metals (sapta-dhatu) and various Gems (ratna). It also deals with substances such as Alkalis (kshara), Salts (lavana), Poisions (visha) and Semi-poisions (upavisha) as well as various alcholic liquors. The Rasa-jala-nidhi (“the ocean of Iatrochemistry, or, che...

Part 3 - Incineration of copper

First process.

Copper leaves are incinerated, if they are smeared with mercury and sulphur, rubbed with lime juice, and then heated by puta, the process being performed three times.

Second process.

Thin leaves of copper are to be kept immersed in cow’s urine for 15 hours in an earthen vessel. After the lapse of that period, mercury, equal in quantity to the copper, and sulphur, double the quantity of the same, are to be put into that vessel, containing cow’s urine. Changeri leaves, duly rubbed, are also to be put upon the copper leaves. The mouth of the vessel is then to be dosed tightly and heat applied underneath. Heating the vessel for three hours will lead to the incineration of the copper which may now be used for all purposes.

Third process (Somanatha-tamra).

A fine and black powder is to be prepared by rubbing together four parts of mercury, four parts of sulphur, two parts of orpiment, and one part of manas-shila. This black powder and copper leaves, equal in quantity to the mercury, are to be put in layers inside a Garbha-yantra (see page 258, vol. I) and heated for three hours. When cooled of itself, the leaves are to be powdered. The ashes, thus prepared, cure colic, udara-roga, anemia, fever, gulma, enlargement of spleen and liver, phthisis, loss of digesting power, gonorrhoea, piles, and chronic and obstinate diarrhoea, if taken with suitable anupana, in doses of 6 raktis a day. This copper is called Somanatha-tamra.

Fourth process.

Mercury with an equal quantity of sulphur, and copper leaves, double the quantity of mercury, are to be rubbed together with the juice of kanya and kept in an earthen vessel The amalgam, thus prepared, is to be covered by means of an earthen basin placed inside the vessel the remaining portion of the vessel being filled with salt The vessel is then to be covered closely by means of another earthen basin placed at the mouth. The vessel is now to be heated for 12 hours resulting in the incineration of the copper leaves which are now to be powdered very fine and used in all sorts of diseases, in doses of three raktis a day, taken with honey and pippali. It is especially efficacious in gulma, enlargement of the spleen and liver, hysteria, colic, udara roga, piles, and diseases relating to the head. It also cures fever affecting the seven dhatus (i.e., liquid essence of food digested, blood, semen, flesh, bone, fat, and marrow), if used with suitable anupana. It may be used in medicines as well as in mercurial operations.

Fifth process (Arka-tala).

Copper and haritala rubbed with lime juice and subjected to puta will cause the incineration of the metal The ashes, thus prepared, cure syphilis, boils, and other diseases due to an excess of kapha and pitta.

Sixth process.

Twenty tolas of purified copper and half its quantity of mercury are to be rubbed together for three days with lime juice. Purified sulphur, equal in quantity to the copper leaves, is then to be rubbed for two hours, with the copper and mercury. The whole thing is then to be put into a glass bottle and heated (by means of a Baluka-yantra[1]) for twenty four hours. When cooled of itself, the contents of the bottle are to be powdered This powder is the king of copper ashes. It cures leprosy, sutika, and all sorts of diseases. It increases the dhatus.

Seventh process.

Copper leaves, smeared with the juice of tilaparni plant, are reduced to ashes of white colour, if burnt by puta.

Eighth process.

Purified copper leaves, half its quantity of mercury and twice its weight of sulphur are to be rubbed with the juice of dugdhika, and then subjected to puta for one day resulting in the incineration of copper.

Ninth process.

Copper leaves, as thin as can be pierced through by means of thorns, are incinerated, if they are smeared with kajvali (mercury and sulphur rubbed into a black powder), rubbed with lime juice, and then exposed to the sun.

Tenth process.

Copper leaves, as thin as can be pierced through by means of thorns, are to be smeared with an equal quantity of sulphur, previously rubbed with some sour vegetable juice, They are then to be dried and subjected to puta, and then powdered. The powder is now to be mixed with one-fourth its quantity of sulphur and rubbed with the juice of lime fruit or of mriga-durba, and then to be subjected to puta. The last process is to be performed for four times, after which the powder is to be rubbed with the juice of matulunga and subjected to puta. This is how copper is reduced to ashes.

Copper leaves are to be rubbed with double their quantity of mercury, rubbed with lime juice and sugar-candy, and then subjected to puta. Three such putas will bring about the incineration of the copper.

Twelfth process.

Copper leaves are to be smeared with double their quantity of sulphur, nibbed with the juices of pashana-bhedi and matsyakshi and then heated by Gaja-puta. The copper is then to be rubbed again with one seventh its weight of sulphur, rubbed with the juice mentioned above and subjected to puta. Seven such putas will result in the incineration of the copper.

Copper leaves and double their quantity of mercury are to be rubbed with lime juice and kept inside a crucible, covered with dhuttura leaves, upon which are to be put powdered sulphur, equal in quantity to the copper. Upon the sulphur is again to be put copper leaves, rubbed as before, and dhuttura leaves and sulphur to be put as before. The whole thing is now to be covered with dhuttura leaves, and the crucible, duly closed, is to be subjected to heat by Gaja-puta. When cooled of itself, the copper is to be powdered and will be found to be in a state of incineration.

Nectarisation of incinerated copper.

Copper, duly purified and incinerated, is to be rubbed with a sour vegetable juice and made into a ball which is to bo confined inside a tuber of shurana. This tuber is to be plastered all over with mud and dried. It is next to be subjected to heat by Gaja-puta. Thus prepared, the copper will be freed from all defects—it will no longer give rise to vomiting, giddiness, purgation, etc.

Use of incinerated copper (1)

Incinerated copper should be taken for six months at a stretch with honey, juice of shalmali, and ghee in doses of one rakti a day. The diet, in this case, should be milk, sugar, and rice or bread with ghee, without any sour thing at all. Such a treatment results in the increase of semen, nutrition, beauty, and eye sight of the person who takes the medicine.

Use of incinerated copper (2)

Incinerated copper rubbed with honey and ginger juice, taken in the morning, in doses of two ractis a day, cures all sorts of udara-roga.

Footnotes and references:

1.

See page 2 59, Vol. I.

Conclusion:

Rasasastra category This concludes ‘Incineration of copper’ included in Bhudeb Mookerjee’s Rasa Jala Nidhi, vol 3: Metals, Gems and other substances. The text includes treatments, recipes and remedies and is categorised as Rasa Shastra: an important branch of Ayurveda that specialises in medicinal/ herbal chemistry, alchemy and mineralogy, for the purpose of prolonging and preserving life.

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