Sutika, Sūtikā: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Sutika means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Sūtikā (सूतिका).—Gra(ṛ)ham—Here bhasma forms amulet: pollution of;1 the place of confinement from which Pradyumna was stolen away by Śambara.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 27. 114; III. 14. 88.
  • 2) Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 27. 3 and 10.

1b) A tribe.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 114. 46.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Rasashastra (Alchemy and Herbo-Mineral preparations)

Source: archive.org: Rasa-Jala-Nidhi: Or Ocean of indian chemistry and alchemy

Sūtikā (सूतिका) refers to “fever” and other ailments following child birth. (see the Rasajalanidhi by Bhudeb Mookerji volume 3)

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

Sūtikā (सूतिका) (or Sūtrikā) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Sūtra forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Cittacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the cittacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the nirmāṇa-puṭa (‘emanation layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Sūtrikā] and Vīras are black in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sūtikā (सूतिका).—f S A woman recently delivered. 2 A disease of women after childbirth.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

sūtikā (सूतिका).—f A woman recently delivered.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sūtikā (सूतिका).—A woman recently delivered; Manusmṛti 5.85.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sūtikā (सूतिका).—f.

(-kā) A woman recently delivered. E. sū-kta svārthe ka ata ittvam .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sūtika (सूतिक):—[from ] [gana] purohitādi (cf. sautikya).

2) Sūtikā (सूतिका):—[from ] f. a woman who has recently brought forth a child, lying-in woman, [Atharva-veda] etc. etc.

3) [v.s. ...] (with or [scilicet] go) a cow that has recently calved, [Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata]

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Sūtikā (सूतिका) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Sūiyā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sutika in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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