Gajaputa, Gajapuṭa, Gaja-puta: 6 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Gajaputa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: archive.org: Rasa-Jala-Nidhi: Or Ocean of indian chemistry and alchemy

Gajapuṭa (गजपुट).—A cubical pit, one gaja in length, breadth, and height, each, is to be filled up with cowdung cakes up to the brim. A crucible, containing the prescribed material, is to be placed upon the heap of cowdung cakes. Half the number of the cakes, required for filling up the pit, are now to be placed upon the heap, which is next to be set fire to. Burning a metal in this way is called, burning by “Gajaputa.” A “gaja” is equaivalent to 30 angulis of an ordinary human being. Burning in this way increases the potency of mercury to a great extent. (see Bhudeb Mookerji and his Rasajalanidhi)

Source: Academia.edu: Ayurveda and Pharmaceutics (rasashastra)

The Gajapuṭa is an arrangement of heating in a pit of 90 cm in length, breadth and depth. Half the pit is filled with cow-dung cakes.

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

gajapūṭa (गजपूट) [or ठ, ṭha].—n A method of preparing medicaments. In a cubical pit of one gaja the herbs, roots, drugs, with goat's dung, charcoal &c. are arranged, and according to the directions of the vaidyaśāstra are calcined, burned, heated &c. v dē, kara.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Gajapuṭa (गजपुट).—a small hole in the ground for fire.

Derivable forms: gajapuṭaḥ (गजपुटः).

Gajapuṭa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms gaja and puṭa (पुट).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gajapuṭa (गजपुट).—m.

(-ṭaḥ) A small hollow for a fire, over which to prepare medical decoctions, extracts, &c. E. gaja, and puṭa a hollow.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Gajapuṭa (गजपुट):—[=gaja-puṭa] [from gaja > gaj] m. a small hole in the ground for a fire (over which to prepare food or medicine), [Bhāvaprakāśa]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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