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Udara, aka: Udāra; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Udara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Āyurveda (science of life)

Udara (उदर) refers to “abdomen”, “womb” or “stomach”. The literal translation is “cavity”, “hollow” or “the interior or inside of anything”. The term is used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Suśruta-saṃhitā and the Caraka-saṃhitā.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botanyĀyurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

1) Udara (उदर) refers to the “belly”. It is one of the parts of the human body with which gestures (āṅgika) are performaned, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

There are three ‘movements of the belly’ (udara) defined:

  1. kṣāma (thin),
  2. khalva (depressed),
  3. pūrṇa (full).

2) Udāra (उदार, “exaltedness”) refers to one of the ten merits (guṇa) of a dramatic play (kāvya), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 17. They are characterised by their sweetness and depth of meaning.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Udāra (उदार, “exaltedness”).—One of the ten guṇas (merits) of a kāvya (dramatic play);—Description of udāra: When the composition includes witty and graceful words having many special senses which are marvellous, it is an instance of Exaltedness (udātta, lit. “deep”).

Source: archive.org: Natya ShastraNāṭyaśāstra book cover
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Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Dharmaśāstra (religious law)

Udāra (उदार).—One whose body is free from defects is called ‘avyaṅgāṅgī’; the term ‘avyaṇga’ standing for freedom from defects; just like such other words as ‘pravīṇa’, ‘udāra’ and the rest.

Source: Google Books: Manusmṛti with the ManubhāṣyaDharmaśāstra book cover
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Dharmaśāstra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharma-shastra) is a category of Hindu literature containing important instructions regarding religious law, ethics, economics, jurisprudence and more. It is categorised as smṛti, an important and authorative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Udāra (उदार) is a Sanskrit word referring to “exalted”, “upright” or “energetic”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Pali

udara : (nt.) bell; stomach; interior. || udāra (adj.), noble; excellent; great; lofty.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Udāra, (adj.) (Sk. udāra, of which the usual P. form is ulāra (q. v.). Cp. BSk. audāra & audārika. ) raised, sublime, noble, excellent Dāvs III, 4 (samussit-odāra-sitātapattaṃ); DA. I, 50 (°issariya); Sdhp. 429, 591. (Page 134)

— or —

Udara, (nt.) (Vedic udara, Av udara belly, Gr. u(ζteros = Lat. uterus belly, womb; Lith. védaras stomach, See also Walde, Lat. Wtb. under vensica) — 1 the belly, stomach D. II, 266; Sn. 78, 604, 609, 716; J. I, 146, 164, 265; Miln. 213; PvA. 283; KhA 57, 58; DhA. I, 47 (pregnant); Sdhp. 102.—2. cavity, interior, inside Dāvs. I, 56 (mandir-odare). —ūnûdara with empty belly Th. 1, 982; Miln. 406, 407; cp. ūna.

—aggi the fire of the belly or stomach (i.e. of digestion) KhA 59; SnA 462; PvA. 33; —âvadehakaṃ (adv.) bhunjati to eat to fill the stomach, eat to satiety, to be gluttonous M. I, 102; A. V, 18; Th. 1, 935; Vism. 33. —paṭala the mucous membrane of the stomach Vism. 359 (= sarīr°abbhantara 261); SnA 248; KhA 55, 61. —pūra stomachfilling Vism. 108. —vaṭṭi “belly-sack”, belly Vin. III, 39, 117; Vism. 262 where KhA reads ud. paṭala). —vāta the wind of the belly, stomach-ache 9J. I, 33, 433; Vism. 41 (°ābādha); DhA. IV, 129. (Page 134)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English DictionaryPali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

udara (उदर).—n (S) The abdomen or belly: also, popularly, the stomach. 2 Ascites, or enlargement of the abdomen from dropsy or flatulence: distinguished into jalōdara, vātōdara, matsyōdara, plīhōdara, sarpōdara, raktōdara. 3 Womb. Ex. mama udarā ālāsi sācāra || tariṃ kari ātāṃ mājhā uddhāra ||

--- OR ---

udāra (उदार).—a (S) Generous, munificent, bountiful. Pr. u0 tōca śrīmanta kṛpaṇa tōca daridrī. See Prov. x. 4, xi. 24, and xxii. 9. 2 Bold, ample, free; opp. to mean, pitiful, contracted, fettered; and applied variously: e. g. Bold, frank, liberal--speech, deportment: open, full, manly--features, countenance: broad, roomy, capacious--boats, vehicles, vessels.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

udara (उदर).—n The belly, the stomach. Womb. Ascites.

--- OR ---

udāra (उदार).—a Generous, munificent, bountiful Bold, open

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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