Purna, Pūrṇa, Pūrṇā: 25 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Purna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण):—Son of Mīḍhvān (son of Ṛkṣa). He had a son named Indrasena. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.2)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—A serpent born of the family of Vāsuki. It was burnt to death at the Sarpasatra of Janamejaya. (Śloka 2, Chapter 57, Ādi Parva).

2) Pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—A Devagandharva born to Kaśyapa of his wife Pradhā. (Chapter 65, Ādi Parva).

3) Pūrṇā (पूर्णा).—The name of the tithis (lunar days) Pañcamī, Daśamī and Pañcadaśī. Yudhiṣṭhira was born on the Pañcamī day called Pūrṇā. (Śloka 6, Chapter 122, Ādi Parva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—A son of Krodhā and a Deva-gandharva.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 6. 38.

2) Pūrṇā (पूर्णा).—A Kalā of the moon.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 35. 92.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.31.6, I.35, I.52.5, I.57, I.59.45, I.65) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Pūrṇa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण) refers to a type of temple (prāsāda) classified, according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 57. The temple is mentioned as one of the six temples being a favorite of Śiva. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) Pūrṇa (पूर्ण, “full”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the cheeks (kapola or gaṇḍa), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya). Instructions: (cheeks are) expanded. Uses: in energy and arrogance.

2) Pūrṇa (पूर्ण, “full”) refers to a specific gesture (āṅgika) made with the belly (udara), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 10. These gestures form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya). Instructions: The full belly is pūrṇa. Uses: In emitting breath, corpulence, disease, too much eating and the like.

Source: Wisdom Library: Saṅgītaśiromaṇi

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण, “complete”) refers to one of the ten good qualities (guṇa) of a song (gīta), according to the Saṅgītaśiromaṇi 14.75-76, where they are commonly known as the gītaguṇa. The Saṅgītaśiromaṇi (“crest-jewel of music”) is a 15th-century Sanskrit work on Indian musicology (gāndharvaśāstra). Accordingly, “when a song is complete in respect of its words (pada), notes (svara), sections (aṅga), variations (prayoga), meldoy (rāga) and poetical metre (chandas), it is complete (pūrṇa)”.

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण, “heptatonic”).—One of the four classes of mūrchāna (melody).—The seven notes (svara) combined in different orders (lit. having an order) are called ‘full’ or heptatonic (pūrṇa-mūrchanās).

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Wisdom Library: Pāñcarātra

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण) refers to an aspect of nṛsiṃha (‘man-lion’), according to the Vihagendra-saṃhitā 4.17, which mentions seventy-four forms (inlcuding twenty forms of vyūha). He is also known as Pūrṇanṛsiṃha or Pūrṇanarasiṃha. Nṛsiṃha is a Tantric deity and refers to the furious (ugra) incarnation of Viṣṇu.

The 15th-century Vihagendra-saṃhīta is a canonical text of the Pāñcarātra corpus and, in twenty-four chapters, deals primarely with meditation on mantras and sacrificial oblations.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: academia.edu: Tithikarmaguṇa in Gārgīyajyotiṣa

Pūrṇā (पूर्णा) or Pūrṇatithi is the name of the fifth of fifteen tithis (cycle of time) according to both the Gārgīyajyotiṣa and the Śārdūlakarṇāvadāna. The associated deity for Pūrṇā according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā is Śaśāṅka. A tithi was defined as one thirtieth of a synodic month (c. 29.5 days), resulting in an average tithi being slightly less than a day.

Accordingly, “(19) The fifth tithi is called Pūrṇā. One should perform firm acts, of the ceremony of consuming new grain, oblation of the first fruits, and of beds, seats and houses. (20) One should engage in activities related to birth, fields, ornaments,
wealth, commerce and medicine. Works of nourishing nature are auspicious. One should know Soma as the deity”.

Source: Wikibooks (hi): Sanskrit Technical Terms

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—Full, complete. Note: Pūrṇa is a Sanskrit technical term used in ancient Indian sciences such as Astronomy, Mathematics and Geometry.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण) is the name of a Śrāvaka mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Pūrṇa).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: The Chronological History of Buddhism

Ghosha and Purna Maitrayaniputra (1165-1080 BCE) Ghosha and Purna were the illustrious philosophers of Sarvastivada. According to Indian and Tibetan traditions, Purna was the author of Dhatukayapada, one of the seven treatises of the Abhidharma of Sarvastivada.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण) and Avaśiṣṭa are the two Indras of the Dvīpakumāras who came to the peak of Meru for partaking in the birth-ceremonies of Ṛṣabha, according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 4: The celestial beings (deva)

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण) refers to one of the two Indras (lords) of the Dvīpakumāra (island youths) class of “residential celestial beings” (bhavanavāsin), itself a main division of devas (celestial beings) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 4.3. The Dvīpakumāras perform miraculous activities in the continents. Pūrṇa and Vaśiṣṭa (Vasiṣṭha?) are the two lords in the Fiendish-youths residential celestial beings.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Pūrṇa.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘cypher’. Note: pūrṇa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—p (S) Full, filled, complete, perfect, entire; deficient in no quantity, part, or member. Used lit. fig. 2 Perfect, adept, thoroughly versed and skilled in.

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pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—n S The name of the cipher applied in almanacks &c. to denote the absence or total want of any particular division among the divisions or distinguished portions of time. Ex. ā- ditvārīṃ ṣaṣṭhī pūrṇa ghaṭikā pāñca palēṃ. On sunday the sixth, ghaṭikā wanting, five palēṃ.

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pūrṇā (पूर्णा).—f S A term for the days of change and full and for the 5th and 10th of the moon.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—p Full. Perfect. Adept.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—p. p. [pur-kta ni°]

1) Filled, filled with, full of; opt. in comp; तं तथा कृपयाविष्टमश्रुपूर्णाकुलेक्षणम् (taṃ tathā kṛpayāviṣṭamaśrupūrṇākulekṣaṇam) Bg.2.1; so शोक°, जल° (śoka°, jala°) &c.

2) Whole, full, entire, complete; पूर्णमदः पूर्णमिदं पूर्णात् पूर्णमुदच्यते (pūrṇamadaḥ pūrṇamidaṃ pūrṇāt pūrṇamudacyate) Īśop.1; अपूर्णमेकेन शतक्रतूपमः (apūrṇamekena śatakratūpamaḥ) R.3.38.

3) Fulfilled, accomplished.

4) Ended, completed.

5) Past, elapsed.

6) Satisfied, contented.

7) Full-sounding, sonorous.

8) Strong, powerful.

9) Selfish, or self-indulgent.

1) Drawn, bent (as a bow) आकर्णपूर्णै- रहनदाक्षेपैराहतं पुनः (ākarṇapūrṇai- rahanadākṣepairāhataṃ punaḥ) Bhāg.8.11.1.

11) Allpervading; पूर्णमप्रवर्तीति वा अहमेतमुपास (pūrṇamapravartīti vā ahametamupāsa) Bṛ. Up.2.1.5; Mb.14.2.28.

-rṇā 1 An epithet of the fifteenth digit of the moon.

2) Name of the fifth, tenth, and fifteenth lunar days or tithis.

-rṇam Ved.

1) Abundance, plenty.

2) Water.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—adj. and n. pr. (proper name) (adj. as in Sanskrit, full, with numerals; wrong division in edd., notably that of Saddharmapuṇḍarīka, often makes the construction seem strange, when it is really quite normal Sanskrit, e.g. [read] aṣṭādaśa kṣetrasahasra pūrṇāḥ [ed. as one word!] Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 9.3 and 24.1; aśīti so antara- kalpa pūrṇāṃ [with aśīti, acc.] 26.12; aśīti pūrṇāḥ 62.3 [ed. as one word]; dvātriṃśatī [so mss., acc.] antarakalpa [so divide] pūrṇāṃ 68.11; compare next verse, dvātriṃśatī antara- kalpa sthāsyatī 69.1; note the same use of paripūrṇa, in: °ṇa so antarakalpa [so divide] ṣaṣṭim 25.8, for full 60 intermediate kalpas; sahasr' aśītiḥ paripūrṇa ye sthitāḥ 35.12; all these are verses), (1) also Pūrṇaka (1), Saṃpūrṇa, qq.v. (= Pali Puṇṇa, -ka, No. 1 in Malalasekara (Dictionary of Pali Proper Names)), name of a sthavira, a well-known disciple of Buddha; his story is told Avadāna-śataka i.2.8 ff. (here always called Pūrṇa except twice Saṃpūrṇa, q.v.); and more fully Divyāvadāna 26.8 ff. (here regularly Pūrṇa, occasionally Pūrṇaka without difference of meaning); a fragment of the story in Mahāvastu, with name Pūrṇako i.245.10; referred to as Pūrṇa Jātakamālā 115.23; Karmavibhaṅga (and Karmavibhaṅgopadeśa) 63.3; (2) Pūrṇa Maitrāyaṇīputra (= Pali Puṇṇa Mantānīputta), name of another disciple of Buddha: as two separate words Mahāvastu iii.377.13 (here Maitrāyaṇīye…putro); 379.3, 12, 17; 382.7; Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 199.1; 200.1, etc.; as one [compound] word, Pūrṇa- Maitrāyaṇīputra, Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 2.7; EV 1.15; Mahāvyutpatti 1036; Gaṇḍavyūha 17.23; and so Sukhāvatīvyūha 2.4, where he seems to be confused with Pūrṇa (3), see s.v. Yaśodeva; (3) name of another disciple of Buddha, corresp. to Pali Puṇṇaji, which should = Pūr- ṇajit: Lalitavistara 1.9 and Sukhāvatīvyūha 2.4, above (see Yaśodeva); (4) name of another disciple of Buddha (the same as 1 ?) called Kuṇḍopadhānīyaka, q.v. (once also Pūrṇaka): Divyāvadāna 44.8; 45.1; (5) name of a former Buddha: Avadāna-śataka i.117.10 ff.; see Saṃpūrṇa 2: (6) (= Pali Puṇṇaka; also [Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit] Pūrṇaka 3), name of a yakṣa: Sādhanamālā 562.20 (prose).

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Pūrṇa (पूर्ण) or Pūrṇaka.—(1) (1): Mahāvastu i.245.10; Divyāvadāna 29.22, 26; 30.5, 10, 14, 16; 31.22; 40.18; 44.15; only the last is in a verse, the rest are prose, often occurring close to the form Pūrṇa which is much commoner, and without any discernible difference of meaning; (2) = Pūrṇa (4): only in a verse, Divyāvadāna 44.15; (3) = Pūrṇa (6): Mahā-Māyūrī 40; 54; 235.12; 236.29; (4) adj. pūrṇaka (= Sanskrit pūrṇa; nowhere recorded [Page351-b+ 71] in this meaning), full: pañcāśa varsāṇi su-pūrṇakāni Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 115.7 (verse), full 50 years; here perhaps -ka m.c.; but prose in Mūla-Sarvāstivāda-Vinaya i.252.20 (same passage Divyāvadāna 133.24 pūrṇa).

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Pūrṇa (पूर्ण) or Saṃpūrṇa.—(1) 1, name of a disciple of Śākyamuni: Avadāna-śataka i.2.2 (here ms. Sa-p°); 3.1; (2) name of a Buddha (possibly = Pūrṇa 5): (Ārya-)Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa 499.23 (verse).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—mfn.

(-rṇaḥ-rṇā-rṇaṃ) 1. Full, filled, complete. 2. All, entire. 3. Strong, powerful, able. 4. Selfish, self-indulgent. f.

(-rṇā) 1. Fifth, tenth, or fifteenth day of the half month. 2. Full moon. E. pūr to be full, aff. kta, form irr.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūrṇa (पूर्ण).—[adjective] filled, full; full of, rich in ([instrumental], [genetive], or —°), complete, abundant; fulfilled, accomplished, satisfied.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pūrṇa (पूर्ण):—[from pūra] mfn. filled, full, filled with or full of ([instrumental case] or [genitive case] or [compound]), [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

2) [v.s. ...] abundant, rich, [Kāvya literature]

3) [v.s. ...] fulfilled, finished, accomplished, ended, past, [Śāṅkhāyana-gṛhya-sūtra; Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] concluded (as a treaty), [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

5) [v.s. ...] complete, all, entire, [Śāṅkhāyana-brāhmaṇa; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

6) [v.s. ...] satisfied, contented, [Rāmāyaṇa]

7) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) perfectly familiar with, [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

8) [v.s. ...] drawn, bent to the full (as a bow), [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa]

9) [v.s. ...] (in augury) full-sounding, sonorous and auspicious (said of the cry of birds and beasts, opp. to dīpta q.v.)

10) [v.s. ...] uttering this cry, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

11) [v.s. ...] strong, capable, able, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

12) [v.s. ...] selfish, self-indulgent, [Horace H. Wilson]

13) [v.s. ...] m. a [particular] form of the sun, [Catalogue(s)]

14) [v.s. ...] a kind of tree, [Rāmāyaṇa]

15) [v.s. ...] (in music) a [particular] measure

16) [v.s. ...] Name of a Nāga, [Mahābhārata]

17) [v.s. ...] of a Deva-gandharva, [ib.]

18) [v.s. ...] of a Buddhist ascetic, [Lalita-vistara]

19) Pūrṇā (पूर्णा):—[from pūrṇa > pūra] f. Name of the 15th Kalā of the month, [Brahma-purāṇa]

20) [v.s. ...] of the 5th, 10th and 15th Tithis, [Varāha-mihira]

21) [v.s. ...] Name of a woman, [Vetāla-pañcaviṃśatikā]

22) [v.s. ...] (with Śāktas) of an authoress of Mantras, [Catalogue(s)]

23) [v.s. ...] of 2 rivers, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

24) Pūrṇa (पूर्ण):—[from pūra] n. fulness, plenty, abundance, [Atharva-veda; Taittirīya-saṃhitā]

25) [v.s. ...] m. water, [Naighaṇṭuka, commented on by Yāska i, 12]

26) [v.s. ...] the cipher or figure 0 [Gaṇitādhyāya]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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