Purnacandra, Pūrṇacandrā, Purnacamdra: 18 definitions

Introduction:

Purnacandra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Purnachandra.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र) refers to the “full moon”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.12.—Accordingly, after Himācala (i.e., Himālaya) brought his daughter (Pārvatī) before Śiva: “Then Śiva looked at her in the first flush of her youth. Her complexion resembled the full blown blue lotus petals. Her face appeared as the full moon [i.e., pūrṇacandra-nibha-ānana]. Her auspicious dress and features were the repositories of all graceful charms. Her neck had the shape of the conch-shell. Her eyes were wide and her ears shone exquisitely. On either side, her long-rounded arms resembling a lotus-stalk shone beautifully. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Pūrṇacandrā (पूर्णचन्द्रा).—One of the ten pīṭhas for images; with two Mekhalas in the middle; gives what he or she desires.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 262. 7, 10, 17.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Rasashastra glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र) or Pūrṇacandrarasa is the name of a Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fifth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 18, Kārśya: thinness). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). However, since it is an ayurveda treatment it should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (e.g., pūrṇacandra-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Pūrṇacandrā (पूर्णचन्द्रा) is the name of the Goddess associated with the direction North and the sacred seat of Pūrṇagiri, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “ (Pūrṇacandrā), the goddess who resides in the door in the north is Pūrṇā Maṅgalā. She has five faces and ten arms and sits on a lion. She wears the full moon [i.e., pūrṇacandra] on her head. The left hands make gestures of fearlessness and boon bestowal, and hold a mirror, a noose, and goad. In the right hands she holds a dagger, bow, sword, pestle, and a fearsome spear. She bestows boons in the north”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र) refers to the “full moon”, according to Sāhib Kaul’s Śārikāstrotra.—Accordingly, “[...] My devotion to you nourishes me every day, as the rise of the full moon (pūrṇacandra-udaya) always nourishes the ocean. On account of the true affluence of victorious devotion to you I even ignore the excellent Lakṣmī. The whole world consists of you, Goddess of Gods! Your body is consciousness, you are alone and perfectly established. Nowhere is there ignorance. Thus, where do we see the son of a barren woman run and raise his bow? [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Vaishnavism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (vaishnavism)

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र) refers to the “full moon”, according to the Vedānta Deśika’s Yatirājasaptati.—When we come to the poem’s understanding of the divinity of Rāmānuja we find a wide spectrum of meanings. [...] Verse 28 is particularly eloquent in describing and encapsulating all his nurturing and protecting qualities, which are compared to those present everywhere in nature itself—as the mountain from which originate all the streams of knowledge, the tree under which the weary traveler wandering in saṃsāra takes rest, the rising sun that keeps the illusionary darkness of those with distorted views at bay and the full moon (pūrṇacandra) that brings to high tide the ocean of the Vedas.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र) refers to the “moon” [=‘full moon’?], according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 2.22cd-28ab]—“[...] That which is described is celebrated in the world as the supreme Amṛta [sa], this is the highest dwelling place. It is the highest Amṛta. Joined with the kalā nectar [visarga], filled with the splendor of the moon (pūrṇacandra-prabhopama). It is the highest abode [of Śiva]. That is the supreme word. That is supreme strength, that is supreme amṛta. The highest of splendors is highest light of light. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Pūrṇacandra] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचंद्र).—m (S) The full moon.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचंद्र).—p The full. moon.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र).—(1) name of a Buddha: Mahāvastu i.124.6; (2) name of a Bodhisattva: Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 3.6.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र).—m. the full of the moon, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 53, 44.

Pūrṇacandra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms pūrṇa and candra (चन्द्र).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र).—[masculine] the full moon.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Dhātupārāyaṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pūrṇacandra (पूर्णचन्द्र):—[=pūrṇa-candra] [from pūrṇa > pūra] m. the full moon, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] Name of a Bodhi-sattva, [Buddhist literature]

3) [v.s. ...] of an author, [Catalogue(s)]

[Sanskrit to German]

Purnacandra in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Purnacandra in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Pūrṇacaṃdra (ಪೂರ್ಣಚಂದ್ರ):—

1) [noun] the moon in a phase in which its entire face is reflecting sunlight to the erth; fullmoon (as on full-moonday.

2) [noun] a particular point in the external genital organ of women, by touching which the desire in women for sexual coition can be roused.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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