Manohara, aka: Manoharā, Manohāra, Manas-hara; 13 Definition(s)

Introduction

Manohara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Manohara in Purana glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Manoharā (मनोहरा) is the city city of Īśāna, guardian (dikpāla) of the north-eastern direction, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 76.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

1) Manoharā (मनोहरा).—Wife of the Vasu, Soma. Varcas was born of her first. Then she had three more sons named Śiśira, Prāṇa and Ramaṇa. (Śloka 22, Chapter 66, Ādi Parva).

2) Manoharā (मनोहरा).—A nymph of Alakāpurī. Once when Aṣṭāvakra went to the court of Kubera this nymph gave a performance in dancing in honour of that sage. (Śloka 45, Chapter 19, Anuśāsana Parva).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1) Manohara (मनोहर).—A tīrtha on the Narmadā sacred to Pitṛs.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 194. 7.

2a) Manoharā (मनोहरा).—A wife of Dhara.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 5. 24.

2b) The wife of Dharma, the Vasu.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 15. 113.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Manohara (मनोहर) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.60.20) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Manohara) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Manohara in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Manoharā (मनोहरा) is the name of one of the thirty-two Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra, as well as one of the thirty-six Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Uḍḍāmareśvaratantra. In the yakṣiṇī-sādhana, the Yakṣiṇī is regarded as the guardian spirit who provides worldly benefits to the practitioner. The Yakṣiṇī (eg., Manoharā) provides, inter alia, daily food, clothing and money, tells the future, and bestows a long life, but she seldom becomes a partner in sexual practices.

Source: academia.edu: Yakṣiṇī-sādhana in the Kakṣapuṭa tantra
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Manohara in Theravada glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

A park laid out by Parakkamabahu I. Cv.lxxix.9.

-- or --

. A tika written by Dhammasenapati Thera. Gv.63, 73.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

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Manohara (मनोहर) refers to a class of mahoraga deities gods according to the Digambara tradition, while the Śvetāmbara does not recognize this class. The mahoraga refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The mahoragas are are dark or black in complexion and the Nāga is their caitya-vṛkṣa (sacred-tree).

The deities such as the Manoharas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

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manohara : (adj.) charming; captivating.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Manohara in Marathi glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

manōhara (मनोहर).—a (S) That steals away the mind; charming, captivating, delightful, lovely. 2 used as s m Rice &c. received from the idol vyaṅkaṭēśa or vyaṅkōbā as a mark of graciousness.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

manōhara (मनोहर).—a Delightful, charming, lovely.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Manohara in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Manohara (मनोहर).—a. pleasing, charming, attractive, fascinating, lovely; अव्याजमनोहरं वपुः (avyājamanoharaṃ vapuḥ) Ś.1.18; Ku.3.39; R.3.32.

-raḥ a kind of jasmine.

-ram gold.

Manohara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms manas and hara (हर).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Manoharā (मनोहरा).—n. of the daughter of Druma, king of the kiṃnaras; her story at length, with her marriage to prince Sudhanu (Divy, MSV Sudhana): Mv ii.97.5 ff. (in the Kiṃnarī Jātaka); Divy 443.2 ff.; MSV i.134.11 ff.; mentioned as last in a list of kiṃnara maids, Kv 7.1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Manohara (मनोहर).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-raṃ) Beautiful, lovely, pleasing. n.

(-raṃ) Gold. E. manas the mind, hṛ to take or steal, aff. ap .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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Agrahara
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