Manojava, Manojavā, Manas-java, Mano-java: 20 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Manojava means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Elements of Hindu Iconograpy

Manojava (मनोजव):—Son of Śiva (aspect of Śiva, as in, one of the eight names of Rudra) and Suvarchalā, according to the Pādma-purāṇa.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

1) Manojavā (मनोजवा, “swift as the mind”):—One of the nine Dūtī presided over by one of the nine bhaivaravas named Manonmanī (emanation of Ananta, who is the central presiding deity of Dūtīcakra), according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra and the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā.

2) Manojavā (मनोजवा):—One of the sixteen yoginīs representing the sixteen petals of the Dūtīcakra. The sixteen petals comprise the outer furnishment, whereupon the abode of the Dūtīs is situated. The Dūtīs refer to the eighty-one “female messengers/deties” of the Dūtīcakra.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (M) next»] — Manojava in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Manojavā (मनोजवा).—One of the seven major rivers situated in Krauñcadvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 88. It is also known by the name Bhogajavā. Krauñcadvīpa is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Jyotiṣmān, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata, who is the son of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Manojava (मनोजव).—The eldest son of the Vasu Anila. Anila begot this son of his wife Śivā. (Śloka 25, Chapter 66, Ādi Parva).

2) Manojava (मनोजव).—During the Manvantara of Cākṣuṣa, the sixth Manu, Indra was Manojava, the leader of the Devas. (Aṃśa 3, Chapter 160, Viṣṇu Purāṇa).

3) Manojava (मनोजव).—A follower of Subrahmaṇya. (Śloka 17, Chapter 46, Śalya Parva).

4) Manojava (मनोजव).—A sacred place situated in Vyāsavana in Kurukṣetra. If one bathes in a pond there one will have to one’s credit the benefit of making a thousand Godānas. (Śloka 93, Chapter 88, Vana Parva).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Manojava (मनोजव).—A son of Medhātithi of Śākadvīpa.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 20. 25.

1b) A son of Īśāna and Śivā.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 10. 79; Vāyu-purāṇa 27. 52.

1c) A Lekha god.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 75.

1d) The Indra of the Cākṣuṣa epoch.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 76; Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 1. 26.

1e) A son of Anila (Anala, Matsya-purāṇa) a Vasava.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 3. 26; Matsya-purāṇa 5. 25; Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 25; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 15. 114.

1f) A god of one of the ten branches of the Harīta gaṇa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 84; Vāyu-purāṇa 100. 89.

2) Manojavā (मनोजवा).—A river in Krauñcadvīpa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 19. 75; Matsya-purāṇa 122. 88; Vāyu-purāṇa 49. 69; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 55.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Manojava (मनोजव) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. III.81.78). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Manojava) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Manojavā also refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.16).

Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Manojava (मनोजव) is the name of Indra in the Cākṣuṣamanvantara: one of the fourteen Manvantaras, according to the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, “In cākṣuṣamanvantara, Manojava was the Indra, Bhāva and others who were the progeny of Āyu were said to be the deities. The seven sages were Sudhāmā, Virajā, Haviṣmān, Uttama, Budha, Atri and Sahiṣṇu”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

A sage of old mentioned in a nominal list. J.vi.99.

context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

1a) Manojavā (मनोजवा) is the name of Dūtī (i.e., messengers of Lord Vajrapāṇi) mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Manojavā).

1b) Manojavā (मनोजवा) also refers to one of the female Śrāvakas mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa.

2) Manojava (मनोजव) is the name of a Garuḍa mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (M) next»] — Manojava in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

manojava : (adj.) swift as thought.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Manojava refers to: (cp. Vedic manojava) swift as thought Vv 6329; PvA. 216 (assājāniya).

Note: manojava is a Pali compound consisting of the words mano and java.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Manojava (मनोजव).—a.

1) quick or swift as thought; मनोजवं मारुततुल्यवेगम् (manojavaṃ mārutatulyavegam) Rāma-rakṣā Stotra 33.

2) quick in thought or conception.

3) fatherly, paternal.

Manojava is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms manas and java (जव).

--- OR ---

Manojavā (मनोजवा).—

1) Name of one of the tongues of Agni.

2) Name of one of the शक्ति (śakti)s of Durgā 'काली कराली च मनोजवा च (kālī karālī ca manojavā ca)' Śruti.

Manojavā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms manas and javā (जवा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Manojavā (मनोजवा).—name of a kind of magic: Divyāvadāna 636.27.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Manojava (मनोजव).—mfn.

(-vaḥ-vā-vaṃ) 1. Fatherly, parental. 2. Quick in thought or apprehension. 3. Swift, as thought. f.

(-vā) A plant: see agnijihvā. n.

(-vaṃ) Quickness of thought or apprehension. E. manas the mind, ju to move, to pervade, aff. ac; or manas compounded with java speed.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Manojava (मनोजव).—I. adj. 1. swift as thought. 2. quick in thought, 3. fatherly, parental. Ii. m. Viṣṇu.

Manojava is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms manas and java (जव).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Manojava (मनोजव).—1. [masculine] the swiftness of thought.

--- OR ---

Manojava (मनोजव).—2. [adjective] swift as thought.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Manojava (मनोजव):—[=mano-java] [from mano > man] m. the speed or swiftness of thought, [Ṛg-veda; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] mfn. swift as thought, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc. (am ind.; -tā f.)

3) [v.s. ...] quick in thought or apprehension, [Horace H. Wilson]

4) [v.s. ...] resembling a father, fatherly, parental, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] m. Name of a son of Anila or the Wind, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa]

6) [v.s. ...] of a son of Rudra Īśāna, [Purāṇa]

7) [v.s. ...] of Indra in the 6th Manv-antara, [ib.]

8) [v.s. ...] of a son of Medhātithi, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

9) [v.s. ...] of a fabulous horse, [Vāsavadattā, [Introduction]]

10) [v.s. ...] a person whose parents are a Brāhman and a Niṣādī, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

11) Manojavā (मनोजवा):—[=mano-javā] [from mano-java > mano > man] f. Name of one of the 7 tongues of Agni, [Muṇḍaka-upaniṣad]

12) [v.s. ...] Methonica Superba, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

13) [v.s. ...] Name of one of the Mātṛs attending on Skanda, [Mahābhārata]

14) [v.s. ...] of a river in Krauñca-dvīpa, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

15) Manojava (मनोजव):—[=mano-java] [from mano > man] m. or n. a kind of magic, [Divyāvadāna]

16) [v.s. ...] n. Name of a Tīrtha, [Mahābhārata]

17) [v.s. ...] of the Varṣa ruled by Medhātithi, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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