Mahakaya, Mahākaya, Mahākāya, Maha-kaya, Mahākāyā: 23 definitions

Introduction:

Mahakaya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Mahakaya in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Mahākāya (महाकाय).—One of the twelve rākṣasas facing the twelve ādityas in the battle of the gods (devas) between the demons (asuras), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 94. This battle was initiated by Mahiṣāsura in order to win over the hand of Vaiṣṇavī, the form of Trikalā having a red body representing the energy of Viṣṇu. Trikalā is the name of a Goddess born from the combined looks of Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Maheśvara (Śiva).

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Mahākāyā (महाकाया).—A woman follower of Lord Subrahmaṇya (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 46, Verse, 24).

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mahākāya (महाकाय) refers to “one who has a huge body”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “Then that Varāṅgī, devoted to him, conceived. The child within her body developed in many years with its brilliance. That Varāṅgī, when the time was complete, delivered of a son of huge body [i.e., mahākāya] and great strength dazzling the ten quarters. At the same time, several phenomena of evil portent forboding misery and distress happened, when the son of Varāṅgī was born making the gods miserable. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mahākāya (महाकाय).—A son of Bhaṇḍa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 26. 47.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mahākāya (महाकाय) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.104) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mahākāya) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Mahākāyā also refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.23).

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Mahākāya (महाकाय) is a Sanskrit name referring to one of the eight manifestations of Ruru, who is a form of Bhairava. According to the Rudrayāmala, there are eight main forms of Bhairava who control the eight directions of this universe. Each form (e.g., Ruru) has a further eight sub-manifestations (e.g., Mahākāya), thus resulting in a total of 64 Bhairavas.

When depicting Mahākāya according to traditional iconographic rules (śilpaśāstra), one should depcit him (and other forms of Ruru) having a pure white color, adorned with ornaments set with rubies; he should carry an akṣamālā, the aṅkuśa, a pustaka and a vīṇā. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Shilpashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Portrayal of Animal Kingdom (Tiryaks) in Epics An Analytical study

Mahākāya (महाकाय) (lit. “one who is large-bodied”) is a synonym (another name) for the Elephant (Gaja), according to scientific texts such as the Mṛgapakṣiśāstra (Mriga-pakshi-shastra) or “the ancient Indian science of animals and birds” by Hamsadeva, containing the varieties and descriptions of the animals and birds seen in the Sanskrit Epics such as the Ramayana and Mahabharata.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Mahākāya (महाकाय) refers to “one who has a great body” and is used to visualize Bhairava, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “He has eight faces and, very powerful, shines like a white lotus. He is mightily proud and has sharp teeth and great body [i.e., mahākāya]. He is terrible and fierce and his face is deformed. O Śambhu, he has twenty arms and the goddess sits on his lap. He holds a sword, mallet and noose, a double-headed drum, a dagger, the Kaustubha jewel, a rosary, a skull bowl full of fruit and the like and a piece of human flesh. [...]”.

2) Mahākāya (महाकाय) refers to one of the eight Servants (ceṭa-aṣṭaka) associated with Candrapīṭha (or Candrapīṭhapura), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra.—[...] The eight Servants (ceṭāṣṭaka): Capala, Lelihāna, Mahākāya, Hanumata, Mahābala, Mahotsāha, Devadatta, Durāsada.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Mahākāyā (महाकाया) refers to “she who has a large body” and is used to describe Bhairavi, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.7cd-17ab, while describing the worship of Bhairavī and Bhairava]—“[Bhairavī] has the appearance of vermillion or lac. [She has] erect hair, a large body (mahākāyā) and is dreadful and very terrifying. [She has the medicinal plant] śatavārī, is five-faced, and adorned with three eyes. [Her hands bear] curved talons curved [She has] eyes like the hollow of a tree and wears a garland of severed heads. [Ten-]armed, like Bhairava [she also] bears Bhairava’s weapons [of an axe and hatched]. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: Bulletin of the French School of the Far East (volume 5)

Mahākāya (महाकाय) [?] is the name of a Yakṣa appointed as one of the Divine protector deities of Aparānta [?], according to chapter 17 of the Candragarbha: the 55th section of the Mahāsaṃnipāta-sūtra, a large compilation of Sūtras (texts) in Mahāyāna Buddhism partly available in Sanskrit, Tibetan and Chinese.—In the Candragarbhasūtra, the Bhagavat invites all classes of Gods and Deities to protect the Law [dharma?] and the faithful in their respective kingdoms of Jambudvīpa [e.g., the Yakṣa Mahākāya in Aparānta], resembling the time of the past Buddhas.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Mahayana from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Mahākaya (महाकय) refers to a class of mahoraga deities gods according to the Śvetāmbara tradition, while the Digambara does not recognize this class. The mahoraga refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The mahoragas are are dark or black in complexion and the Nāga is their caitya-vṛkṣa (sacred-tree).

The deities such as the Mahākayas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

Mahākāya (महाकाय) and Atikāya are the two Indras (i.e., lords or kings) of the Mahoragas who came to the peak of Meru for partaking in the birth-ceremonies of Ṛṣabha, according to chapter 1.2 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 4: The celestial beings (deva)

Mahākāya (महाकाय) refers to one of the two Indras (lords) of the Mahoraga class of “peripatetic celestial beings” (vyantara), itself a main division of devas (celestial beings) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 4.6. Atikāya and Mahākāya are the two lords in the class ‘great serpent’ peripatetic celestial beings.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Mahakaya in India is the name of a plant defined with Zea mays in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Zea segetalis Salisb. (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· FBI (1897)
· Cyclopedia of American Horticulture (2006)
· New York State Agric. Expt. Sta. Rept. (1884)
· Proceedings of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1891)
· De Fructibus et Seminibus Plantarum… . (1788)
· Prodromus stirpium in horto ad Chapel Allerton vigentium. (1796)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Mahakaya, for example pregnancy safety, diet and recipes, extract dosage, side effects, health benefits, chemical composition, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Biology from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahakaya in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mahākāya : (adj.) having a fat or big body.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahākāya (महाकाय).—a. big-bodied, big, gigantic, bulky. (-yaḥ) 1 an elephant.

2) an epithet of Śiva.

3) of Viṣṇu.

4) of a being attending on Śiva (= nandi).

Mahākāya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and kāya (काय).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Mahākāya (महाकाय).—name of a garuḍa prince: Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 5.5.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahākāya (महाकाय).—mfn.

(-yaḥ-yā-yaṃ) Large, bulky, stout. m.

(-yaḥ) 1. A name of Nandi, the door-keeper and attendant of Siva. 2. An elephant. E. mahā large and kāya body.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahākāya (महाकाय).—[adjective] of great stature, gigantic.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mahākāya (महाकाय):—[=mahā-kāya] [from mahā > mah] mfn. large-bodied, of great stature, tall, bulky, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Pañcatantra] etc. (-tva n.)

2) [v.s. ...] m. an elephant, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of Viṣṇu, [Dhyānabindu-upaniṣad]

4) [v.s. ...] of Śiva, [Mahābhārata]

5) [v.s. ...] of a being attending on Śiva, [Mahābhārata]

6) [v.s. ...] of a king of the Garuḍas, [Buddhist literature]

7) Mahākāyā (महाकाया):—[=mahā-kāyā] [from mahā-kāya > mahā > mah] f. Name of one of the Mātṛs attending on Skanda, [Mahābhārata]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahākāya (महाकाय):—[mahā+kāya] (yaḥ) 1. m. Shiva's doorkeeper; an elephant. a. Large.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mahakaya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of mahakaya in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: