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Mahakaya, aka: Mahākaya, Mahākāya; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Mahakaya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Śilpaśāstra (iconography)

Mahākāya (महाकाय) is a Sanskrit name referring to one of the eight manifestations of Ruru, who is a form of Bhairava. According to the Rudrayāmala, there are eight main forms of Bhairava who control the eight directions of this universe. Each form (eg., Ruru) has a further eight sub-manifestations (eg., Mahākāya), thus resulting in a total of 64 Bhairavas.

When depicting Mahākāya according to traditional iconographic rules (śilpaśāstra), one should depcit him (and other forms of Ruru) having a pure white color, adorned with ornaments set with rubies; he should carry an akṣamālā, the aṅkuśa, a pustaka and a vīṇā. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstraŚilpaśāstra book cover
context information

Śilpaśāstra (शिल्पशास्त्र, shilpa-shastra) represents the ancient Indian science of creative arts such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vāstuśāstra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Purāṇa

Mahākāya (महाकाय).—One of the twelve rākṣasas facing the twelve ādityas in the battle of the gods (devas) between the demons (asuras), according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 94. This battle was initiated by Mahiṣāsura in order to win over the hand of Vaiṣṇavī, the form of Trikalā having a red body representing the energy of Viṣṇu. Trikalā is the name of a Goddess born from the combined looks of Brahmā, Viṣṇu and Maheśvara (Śiva).

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Mahākāya (महाकाय).—A son of Bhaṇḍa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 26. 47.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

In Buddhism

Pali

mahākāya : (adj.) having a fat or big body.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English DictionaryPali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Mahākaya (महाकय) is the name of class of mahoraga gods according to the Śvetāmbara tradition, while the Digambara does not recognize this class. The mahoraga refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The mahoragas are are dark or black in complexion and the Nāga is their caitya-vṛkṣa (sacred-tree).

The deities such as the Mahākayas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Relevant definitions

Search found 3 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Ruru
Ruru (रुरु) is the name of an asura king who terrorised the gods (devas), according to the V...
Kanda
Kanda (कन्द, “bulb”).—One of the ten kinds of “plant-bodies” (vanaspati) a soul (jīva) can be r...
Mahoraga
Mahoraga (महोरग).—The mahoragas are a group of deities categorised as belonging to the vyantara...

Relevant text

Search found 10 books containing Mahakaya, Mahākaya or Mahākāya. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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