Mahabala, aka: Mahābalā, Mahābala, Maha-bala; 17 Definition(s)

Introduction

Mahabala means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Mahābalā (महाबला):—One of the sixty-seven Mahauṣadhi, as per Rasaśāstra texts (rasa literature). These drugs are useful for processing mercury (rasa), such as the alchemical processes known as sūta-bandhana and māraṇa.

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

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Mahābalā (महाबला):—Sanskrit name of one of the thirty-two female deities of the Somamaṇḍala (second maṇḍala of the Khecarīcakra) according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. She is also known as Mahāmbikā according to the Ṣaṭsāhasra-saṃhitā. These goddesses are situated on a ring of sixteen petals and represent the thirty-two syllables of the Aghoramantra. Each deity (including Mahābalā) is small, plump and large-bellied. They can assume any form at will, have sixteen arms each, and are all mounted on a different animal.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Mahābala (महाबल) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Gokarṇa, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (eg., Mahābala) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Mahābala (महाबल) is a Sanskrit word referring to a Nāga king. Acording to the Nāṭyaśāstra 1.82-88, when Brahmā, Indra and all other gods went to inspect the playhouse (nāṭyamaṇḍapa) designed by Viśvakarmā, he assigned different deities for the protection of the playhouse itself, as well as for the objects relating to dramatic performance (prayoga).

As such, Brahmā assigned Mahābala and Nāgamukhya to the two blades of the door (door-shafts, dvārapatra). The protection of the playhouse was enacted because of the jealous Vighnas (malevolent spirits), who began to create terror for the actors.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

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1) Mahābala (महाबल).—Minister of Śrīdatta (See under the word Śrīdatta).

2) Mahābala (महाबल).—A follower of Lord Subrahmaṇya. (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 45, Verse 71).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Mahābala (महाबल).—An attendant on Hari.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa XI. 27. 28.

1b) A son of Danu.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 6. 16; Vāyu-purāṇa 68. 7.

1c) One of the ten sons of Hṛdīka.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 44. 82.

1d) An Asura in the sabhā of Hiraṇyakaśipu.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 161. 80.

1e) A Kinnara gaṇa, horse-faced.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 32.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mahābala (महाबल) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.40, IX.44.104) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mahābala) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Mahābalā also refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.45.9).

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

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Mahābala (महाबल) is the name of a minister and friend of Śrīdatta, a Brāhman whose story is told in the “story of Śrīdatta and Mṛgāṅkavatī”, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 10. Śrīdatta was the son of Kālanemi, who was the son of Yajñasoma, a Brāhman from the country of Mālava

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Mahābala, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

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Mahābalā (महाबला) or Mahābalatithi is the name of the eighth of fifteen tithis (cycle of time) according to both the Gārgīyajyotiṣa and the Śārdūlakarṇāvadāna. The associated deity for Mahābalā according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā is Vasavaḥ (the Vasus). A tithi was defined as one thirtieth of a synodic month (c. 29.5 days), resulting in an average tithi being slightly less than a day.

Accordingly, “(25) The eighth tithi is called Mahābalā. One should make army armors, appoint officials, and [produce] military machines and bows. (26) He should make fortification, as well as underground passages and ditches in the city. He should employ elephants and horses. The Vasus are the gods on this tithi”.

Source: academia.edu: Tithikarmaguṇa in Gārgīyajyotiṣa
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

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Mahābala (महाबल) is author of the Muktiphala and great-grandfather of Lakṣmaṇadeśika, according to his 11th-century Śaradātilaka verse 25.83-84.—“(83) I bow to that Mahābala, who is cooled by the embrace of the creeper of knowledge, by whom the ripe “fruit of liberation” (Muktiphala) has been offered from the branches of the Veda [tree] to those who approach [him]. (84) From that [Mahābala] was born the most excellent elephant among all teachers, who habitually sported playfully in the ocean of the six rites (of magic) (ṣaṭkarmasāgara), whose victorious title Ācārya-Paṇḍita, spread out over the triple world, good people proclaim”.

Source: academia.edu: The Śāradātilakatantra on Yoga
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Mahabala in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahābalā (महाबला) is another name for Vatsādanī, a medicinal plant identified with Cocculus hirsutus (broom creeper or ink berry) from the Menispermaceae or “moonseed” family of flowering plants, according to verse 3.102-104 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Mahābalā and Vatsādanī, there are a total of six Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Mahābalā (महाबला) is the goddess presiding over one of the six petals of the southern lotus of the vārāhyabhyudaya-maṇḍala, according to the Vārāhyabhyudayatantra. These six petals are presided over by a kuleśvarī (presiding lady) named Pāṇḍaravāsinī. The central deity of the vārāhyabhyudaya-maṇḍala is the twelve-armed Vajravarāhī.

Mahābalā is associated with the sacred site (pīṭha) named Sindhu. All the goddess of the southern lotus petals are to be visualised as dancing naked and being half-male / half-female (ardhanarīśvarī) with their two sides being yellow and red. In their four arms they brandish a bowl and staff, with a ḍamaru and their familial attribute.

The Vārāhyabhyudayatantra is an explanatory tantra on the Laghuśaṃvara, but its verses are largerly extracted from the 10th century Abhidhānottaratantra, a scriputre describing various sādhanas (path towards spiritual realization).

Source: Wisdomlib Libary: Vajrayogini
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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General definition (in Buddhism)

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Mahābala (महाबल) refers to the seventh of the “ten wrathful ones” (daśakrodha) as defined in the Dharma-saṃgraha (section 11). The Dharma-samgraha (Dharmasangraha) is an extensive glossary of Buddhist technical terms in Sanskrit (eg., daśa-krodha and Mahābala). The work is attributed to Nagarguna who lived around the 2nd century A.D.

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-samgraha

Mahābala (महाबल) is the forty-fifth of sixty digits (decimal place) in an special enumeration system mentioned by Vasubandhu in his Abhidharmakośa (“treasury of knowledge”). The explanations of the measure of years, eons, and so forth must be comprehended through calculation based on a numerical system. Enumeration begins from one and increases by a factor of ten for each shift in decimal place. The sixtieth number in this series is called “countless”.

Among these decimal positions (eg., mahābala), the first nine positions from one to one hundred million are called ‘single set enumeration’. From a billion up to, but not including countless is “the enumeration of the great companion” and is called the ‘recurring enumeration’.

Source: Wisdom Library: Buddhism

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahabala in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahābala (महाबल).—a. very strong; नियुज्यमानो राज्याय नैच्छद्राज्यं महाबलः (niyujyamāno rājyāya naicchadrājyaṃ mahābalaḥ) Rām (-laḥ) 1 wind, storm.

2) a Buddha.

3) a solid bamboo.

4) a palm.

5) a crocodile.

Mahābala is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and bala (बल).

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Mahābalā (महाबला).—Name of a plant; महाबला च पीतपुष्पा सहदेवी च सा स्मृता (mahābalā ca pītapuṣpā sahadevī ca sā smṛtā) Bhāva. P.

-lam lead. °ईश्वरः (īśvaraḥ) Name of a Liṅga of Śiva near the modern Mahābaleśwara.

Mahābalā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and balā (बला).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahābala (महाबल).—(1) nt., a high number: Mvy 8033; compare bala 4; (2) m., n. of two former Buddhas, in the same list: Mv iii.231.5; 237.3; (3) perh. n. of a disciple of Śākyamuni (or merely adj.?): Mv i.182.18; (4) n. of a nāga: Mvy 3343; (5) n. of a king: Samādh p. 16 line 15 ff.; (6) n. of one of the krodha, q.v.: Dharmas 11; Sādh 137.12 etc.

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Mahābalā (महाबला).—n. of a yoginī: Sādh 427.7.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Mahābala (महाबल).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) Strong, robust, powerful. m.

(-laḥ) 1. Air, wind. 2. A Budd'ha or Baudd'ha deified saint. n.

(-laṃ) Lead. f.

(-lā) A sort of Sida with yellow flowers, (S. rhombifolia.) E. mahā great or much, and bala strong, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 2388 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Bala
Bala (बल).—mfn. (-laḥ-lā-laṃ) Strong, stout, robust, powerful. m. (-laḥ) 1. Bala- Deva, the eld...
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Mahakala
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Balaka
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Mahasena
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Mahalakshmi
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Baladeva
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