Mahanada, aka: Mahānādā, Mahānada, Mahānāda, Maha-nada; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Mahanada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Mahanada in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahānāda (महानाद) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Aṭṭahāsa, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (eg., Mahānāda) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana

Mahanada in Purana glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahānadā (महानदा) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Mahānadā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Mahānāda (महानाद).—A Rākṣasa. In Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa, Yuddha Kāṇḍa, we see that he was a Minister and the uncle of Rāvaṇa.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1) Mahānada (महानद).—A river from the Rkṣa hill.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 29.

2a) Mahānāda (महानाद).—An Asura residing in Tatvalam.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 20. 16.

2b) A name of Vighneśvara.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 67.

2c) A tīrtha sacred to the Pitṛs.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 22. 53.

3) Mahānādā (महानादा).—A mother goddess.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 31.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Mahanada in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

The name of this chakra means 'Great Sound', and it is in the shape of a plough. It represents the primal sound from which emanates all of creation.

Also see: Sahasrāra.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

India history and geogprahy

Mahānada (महानद) is the name of a river found in India.—It is identical with the present Mahana, two miles away from Kailvan in Patna district, Bihar.

Source: archive.org: Geography in Ancient Indian inscriptions
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahanada in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahānada (महानद).—a great river.

Derivable forms: mahānadaḥ (महानदः).

Mahānada is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and nada (नद).

--- OR ---

Mahānāda (महानाद).—

1) a loud sound, uproar.

2) a great drum.

3) a thunder-cloud.

4) a shell.

5) an elephant.

6) a lion.

7) the ear.

8) a camel.

9) an epithet of Śiva.

-dam a musical instrument.

Derivable forms: mahānādaḥ (महानादः).

Mahānāda is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and nāda (नाद).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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