Melapaka, Mēḷāpāka, Melāpāka, Melāpaka: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Melapaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Mēḷāpāka can be transliterated into English as Melapaka or Meliapaka, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Melāpaka (मेलापक) refers to “union” (with the Yoginīs), according to the Kulapañcāśikā, an unpublished text attributed to Matsyendranātha teaching secrecy.—Accordingly, “O goddess, one who has matted hair, (or a) shaved head, is covered in ashes and, adorned with the five insignias, observes (the ascetic’s) vow and conduct, one who practices ritual intercourse and is dedicated to drinking as Kaulas do (vīrapāna) within my body is, O Maheśvarī, one who knows (the teachings of the) Kula and is fit by virtue of each one of these (practices) for union (with the Yoginīs) [i.e., melāpaka]. Endowed with right knowledge, O goddess, he unites (with the Yoginīs) in (each) sacred seat, field and village, if he is dedicated to the wisdom of (his) teacher”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (tantric buddhism)

Melāpaka (मेलापक) refers to a “meeting place” and represents one of the various classes of sacred sites, according to the Netravibhaṅga, a commentary on the Hevajratantra by Dharmakīrti.—Accordingly, “It is called a ‘seat’ (pīṭha) because one always stays there and performs the practice, also because the yogis stay there. Because it is near to that place, it is called ‘nearby seat’ (upapīṭha). It is called ‘field’ (kṣetra), because it produces good qualities, also because the mother-goddesses stay there. Because it is near to there, it is called ‘near-by field’ (upakṣetra). Because one desires and yearns, it is called Chando. Because it is near there, it is called ‘near-by Chando’. It is called ‘meeting place’ (melāpaka) because it is the site of a place, [for example] Magadha and Aṅgamagadha. It is called ‘near-by meeting place’ because it is near there. It is called ‘cemetery’ (śmaśāna) because no discriminating thought (vikalpa) arises and because there are many corpses. It is called ‘near-by cemetery’, because it is near to there”.

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)

Melāpaka (मेलापक) is one of the Pīṭhādis (group of districts) present within the Kāyacakra (‘circle of body’) which is associated with the Ḍākinī named Pātālavāsinī (‘a woman living underground’), according to the 9th-centruy Vajraḍākatantra.

The Pīṭhādi named Melāpaka within the Kāyacakra contains the following four districts or seats:

  1. Pretādhivāsinī,
  2. Gṛhadevatā.
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Melāpaka.—(LP), a group. Note: melāpaka is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mēḷāpāka (मेळापाक).—m Reconciliation (of disagreeing persons): also meeting again of separated friends or relatives: any agreeable and genuine remeeting. 2 Gathering together of apparatus or materials in general.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Melāpaka (मेलापक).—

1) Uniting, bringing together, collecting.

2) Conjunction of planets.

3) A crowd, assembly.

Derivable forms: melāpakaḥ (मेलापकः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Melāpaka (मेलापक):—[from mela] m. ([from] [Causal]) uniting, bringing together, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra [Scholiast or Commentator]]

2) [v.s. ...] conjunction, (of planets), [Catalogue(s)]

[Sanskrit to German]

Melapaka in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mēlāpaka (ಮೇಲಾಪಕ):—[noun] = ಮೇಲಾಪ - [melapa -] 1.

--- OR ---

Mēḷāpaka (ಮೇಳಾಪಕ):—[noun] = ಮೇಳಾಪ - [melapa -] 1.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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