Mahabhaya, aka: Maha-bhaya, Mahābhayā, Mahābhaya; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Mahabhaya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Mahabhaya in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahābhayā (महाभया) is the name of one of the thirty-two Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra, as well as one of the thirty-six Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Uḍḍāmareśvaratantra. In the yakṣiṇī-sādhana, the Yakṣiṇī is regarded as the guardian spirit who provides worldly benefits to the practitioner. The Yakṣiṇī (eg., Mahābhayā) provides, inter alia, daily food, clothing and money, tells the future, and bestows a long life, but she seldom becomes a partner in sexual practices.

Source: academia.edu: Yakṣiṇī-sādhana in the Kakṣapuṭa tantra
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of mahabhaya in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Mahabhaya in Purana glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahābhaya (महाभय).—A Rākṣasa. He was born to Adharma by his wife Nirṛti. Mahābhaya had two brothers named Bhaya and Mṛtyu. (Mahābhārata Ādi Parva, Chapter 66, Verse 54).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Mahābhaya (महाभय) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.60.53) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mahābhaya) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Mahabhaya in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahābhaya (महाभय, “terror”):—In Vedic hinduism, he is one of the three sons of Adharma (‘sin’) and his wife Nirṛti (‘misery’).

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Mahābhaya (महाभय) refers to one of the eight charnel grounds (śmaśāna) of the Medinīcakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the medinīcakra refers to one of the three divisions of the dharma-puṭa (‘dharma layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. Mahābhaya is associated with the tree (vṛkṣa) named Nālīra; with the female world-guardian (lokapālinī) named Rudrā; with a female serpent (nāginī) and with a female cloud (meghinī).

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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