Rukmini, aka: Rukmiṇī; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Rukmini means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Rukmini in Purana glossary... « previous · [R] · next »

Rukmiṇī (रुक्मिणी).—The chief queen of Śrī Kṛṣṇa. Birth. From the following Purāṇic statements, it could be understood that Rukmiṇī was the incarnation of goddess Lakṣmī. (See full article at Story of Rukmiṇī from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Rukmiṇī (रुक्मिणी).—A daughter of Bhīṣmaka and known as Vaidarbhī. Married to Kṛṣṇa according to Gāndharva? (Rākṣasa) form;1 when she came to know of the proposal of her eldest brother Rukmi (s.v.) to give her in marriage to Caidya, she sent a letter through a Brāhmaṇa to Kṛṣṇa showing her unflinching devotion to him and requesting that she might be carried off when she would be on her way to the Devī temple on the day prior to the wedding as was the custom. That day she had her bath and decked herself with two clothes and many jewels. Her anxiety at not having heard from Kṛṣṇa, when the Brāhmaṇa came to tell her that Kṛṣṇa would do the needful. Citizens were also for her marriage with Kṛṣṇa. Well guarded and accompanied by singing and dancing, Rukmiṇī entered the temple and prayed for Kṛṣṇa's hand. After worshipping Indrāṇī nearby she returned when Kṛṣṇa carried her away in his chariot. Seeing the party of Caidya pursuing him, Rukmiṇī became nervous when Kṛṣṇa consoled her. When Caidya was about to be killed by Kṛṣṇa she appealed to the Lord to spare him; Rāma consoled her. The regular marriage and festivities followed.2 Mother of 11 sons and a daughter; gave birth to Pradyumna who was stolen by Śambara and thrown into the sea. Recovered and taken back by Māyāvatī alias Ratī; Rukmiṇī remembered her lost son and wondered at his exact resemblance. At that time came Kṛṣṇa and Nārada who explained the history of Pradyumna to her great joy;3 was the chief queen of Kṛṣṇa and more attached; would not like to be away from Kṛṣṇa; when she was once fanning him gently Kṛṣṇa cut a joke that his status was poor and that she could even then get married to a rich prince and enjoy luxuries. Rukmiṇī wept in deep distress and spoke words reiterating her full devotion to him. Kṛṣṇa consoled her assuring her of his loyalty.4 Grave concern at Kṛṣṇa not returning from the cave of Jāmbavan for a long time. Her daughter Cārumatī was married to the son of Kṛtavarman.5 Attended the marriage of Aniruddha and Rocanā at Bhojakaṭa; out of regard for her and Balarāma, Kṛṣṇa said nothing on Rukmi's death.6 Explained to Draupadī how she became married to Kṛṣṇa; welcomed to Hāstinapura by Kuntī and Draupadī; served Kucela, a friend and classmate of Kṛṣṇa.7 Entered fire on Kṛṣṇa's decease;8 is Lakṣmī.9

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa III. 3. 3; X. 52. 16-18; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 71. 242-6; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 9. 144; V. 26 (whole).
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. Chh. 52-54.
  • 3) Ib. III. 1. 28; X. 55 (whole) ; Matsya-purāṇa 47. 13, 15-16; Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 233; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 27. 3, 27; 28. 1-2; 30. 35; 32. 1.
  • 4) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 60 (whole) ; 70. 3; 90. 30.
  • 5) Ib. X. 56. 34; 61. 24.
  • 6) Ib. X. 61. 26-39.
  • 7) Ib. X. 71. 42; 76. 2; 80. 23; 83. 8.
  • 8) Ib. XI. 31. 20. Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 38. 1-2.
  • 9) Ib. IV. 15. 35.

1b) The goddess at Dvāravatī.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 13. 38.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Rukmiṇī (रुक्मिणी, “adorned with gold”):—One of the nine Dūtī presided over by one of the nine bhaivaravas named Yogeśa (emanation of Ananta, who is the central presiding deity of Dūtīcakra), according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra and the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Rukmini was the daughter of King Bhishmaka, the ruler of the Bhoja Kingdom. She had fallen in love with Krishna after having heard his heroic exploits, but her brother, prince Rukmi, was desirous of marrying her to his friend, King Shishupala of Chedi.

She is the mother of Pradyumna.

Source: Apam Napat: Indian Mythology

Rukmiṇī (रुक्‍मिणी): Daughter of Raja Bhismak, born at Kundalpur. Rukmini was the first wife and queen of Krishna, the 8th avatar of Vishnu. She was an avatar of Lakshmi.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Rukmiṇī (रुक्मिणी).—Lord Kṛṣṇa’s principal queen in Dvārakā; the chief of Lord Kṛṣṇa’s wives.

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

India history and geogprahy

Rukmiṇī (रुक्मिणी) is the mother of Gaṅgādharakavi (19th century): author of Vṛttacandrikā and disciple of Viśvanātha, the brother of Candraśekhara. Gaṅgādharakavi was born in a Mahārāṣṭra Brahmin family and migrated to Nagpur from Maṅgrūl village in Buldana district of Berar. He was the contemporary of king Raghujī III and his successor Jānojī. Gaṅgādharakavi composed 14 works and commentaries in Sanskrit. Vṛttacandrikā is the lone work on Prosody.

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Rukmiṇī (रुक्मिणी).—The daughter of Bhīṣmaka of Vidarbha. [She was betrothed by her father to Śiśupāla, but she secretly loved Kṛṣṇa and sent him a letter praying him to take her away. Kṛṣṇa with Balarāma came and snatched her off after having defeated her brother in battle. She bore to Kṛṣṇa a son named Pradyumna.].

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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