Manorama, aka: Manoramā, Manas-rama; 14 Definition(s)

Introduction

Manorama means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Manoramā (मनोरमा):—First wive of king Dhruvasandhi (son of Puṣpa) of the Solar Dynasty. Manoramā gave birth to the beautiful child named Sudarśana. See the Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa 3.14 (The glories of Devī).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śrīmad Devī Bhāgavatam
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Manoramā (मनोरमा) is the name of an Apsara created for the sake of a type of dramatic perfomance. Acording to the Nāṭyaśāstra 1.46-51, after Brahmā asked Bharata for materials necessary for the Graceful Style (kaiśikī: a type of performance, or prayoga), Bharata answered “This Style cannot be practised properly by men except with the help of women”. Therefore, Brahmā created with his mind several apsaras (celestial nymphs), such as Manoramā, who were skillful in embellishing the drama.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

Purana

Manoramā (मनोरमा) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Manoramā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

(Source): Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

1) Manoramā (मनोरमा).—Wife of Dhruvasandhi King of Kosala. (See under Dhruvasandhi for details).

2) Manoramā (मनोरमा).—A celestial woman. She was the daughter of Kaśyapa Prajāpati, born of his wife Pradhā. (Śloka 50, Chapter 65, Ādi Parva). She participated in the Janmotsava of Arjuna. (Śloka 62, Chapter 122, Ādi Parva).

3) Manoramā (मनोरमा).—Once by his spiritual powers the sage Uddālaka brought the river Sarasvatī to his place of yajña and that diversion was then known as Manoramā. (Śloka 25, Chapter 38, Śalya Parva).

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Manoramā (मनोरमा).—A mind-born mother.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 26.

1b) An Apsarasa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 6.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Manoramā (मनोरमा).—(I) the popular name given to the commentary प्रौढमनेरमा (prauḍhamaneramā) on the Siddhāntakaumudī of भट्टोजीदीक्षित (bhaṭṭojīdīkṣita) by the author himself; the commentary is a scholarly one and very extensive; and its first portion only upto the end of Kāraka is generally read in the Sanskrit Pāṭhaśālās;(2) name of a commentary on the Madhyasiddhāntakaumudī by Rāmasarman; (3) name given to a treatise discussing roots given in the Kātantra Grammar written by रमानाथशर्मा (ramānāthaśarmā) in the sixteenth century. The work is called कातन्त्रधातुवृत्ति (kātantradhātuvṛtti) also.

(Source): Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar
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Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Manoramā (मनोरमा) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E.) in his Vṛttaratnāvalī. Nañjuṇḍa was a poet of both Kannada and Sanskrit literature flourished in the court of the famous Kṛṣṇarāja Woḍeyar of Mysore. He introduces the names of these metres (eg., Manoramā) in 20 verses.

(Source): Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature
Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

Itihasa (narrative history)

Manoramā (मनोरमा) refers to the name of a Lady mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.48, I.65). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Manoramā) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

1) Manorama (मनोरम) refers to a species of Graiveyaka gods, who are in turn a subclass of the Kalpātīta gods, according to Jain cosmological texts in both the Śvetāmbara and Digambara tradition. The Kalpātīta (those born beyond heavens) represent a sub-species of the Vaimānika gods, which in turn represents the fourth main classification of devas (gods).

The Graiveyakas (eg., the Maṇoramas) do not bind karmans, are 1-sensed class of beings and have an immovable body, warm splendour, cold lustre, animal state of existence, ānupūrvī and āyus.

2) Manorama (मनोरम) refers to a class of kinnara deities according to both the Digambara and Śvetāmbara traditions. The kinnaras refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The kinnaras are black in complexion and their caitya-vṛkṣas (sacred-tree) is Aśoka according to both traditions.

3) Manorama (मनोरम) refers to a class of mahoraga deities gods according to the Śvetāmbara tradition, while the Digambara does not recognize this class. The mahoraga refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas). The mahoragas are are dark or black in complexion and the Nāga is their caitya-vṛkṣa (sacred-tree).

The deities such as the Manoramas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Jainism
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

India history and geogprahy

Manoramā (मनोरमा) is the name of a Commentary on Amarakośa on the topic of Grammar & Lexicon ascribed to Raghunātha Dāsa (C. 1680-1750 C.E), a celebrated author of Oḍiśā who composed many work in different disciplines of Sanskrit Literature. Also see the “New Catalogus Catalogorum” XXII. p. 206.

(Source): Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (history)
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

manorama : (adj.) delightful.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Marathi-English dictionary

manōrama (मनोरम).—a (S) Gratifying to the mind; pleasing, charming, delightful, agreeable.

--- OR ---

manōramā (मनोरमा).—f (S A lovely woman.) An endearing term for a wife or a mistress.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

manōrama (मनोरम).—a Pleasing, charming.

--- OR ---

manōramā (मनोरमा).—f An endearing term for a wife or a mistress.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Manorama (मनोरम).—a. attractive, pleasing, agreeable, lovely, beautiful; अरुण- नखमनोरमासु तस्याः (aruṇa- nakhamanoramāsu tasyāḥ) (aṅgulīṣu) Ś.6.11; पुरस्ताद्विमले पात्रे सुविस्तीर्णे मनोरमे (purastādvimale pātre suvistīrṇe manorame) Suśruta. (-) 1 a lovely woman.

2) a kind of pigment.

Manorama is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms manas and rama (रम).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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