Avatarana, Avataraṇa, Avatāraṇa: 21 definitions

Introduction:

Avatarana means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Avataran.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Avataraṇa (अवतरण, “coming down”) refers to one of the nine preliminaries performed behind the stage curtain, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 5. Accordingly, “The seating of singers is called the Avataraṇa (lit. coming down).”

Performing the avataraṇa preliminary pleases the Apsarasas. According to Nāṭyaśāstra 5.57-58, “The performance of the Preliminaries which means worshipping (pūjā) the gods (devas), is praised by them (i.e. gods) and is conducive to duty, fame and long life. And this performance whether with or without songs, is meant for pleasing the Daityas and the Dānavas as well as the gods.”

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Ayurveda glossary
Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Avataraṇa (अवतरण):—[avataraṇaṃ] Putrifaction

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (philosophy)

Avatāraṇa (अवतारण) refers to “acceptance (of a claim)”, according to the Īśvarapratyabhijñāvivṛtivimarśinī 2.131-132.—Accordingly, “[...] For this very reason, in our system the [Buddhist] externalist’s claim that a concept involves no real manifestation cannot be accepted at all (nir-avatāraṇa): since the proponent of the theory that cognition has aspects says that a concept is [immediately] manifest in itself [insofar as every cognition is immediately aware of itself,] even though with respect to the object, [this concept] is a [mere] determination, how could it have a nonexistent manifestation? So enough with this”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Mahayana glossary
Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Avatāraṇa (अवतारण) refers to “teaching (the dharma)”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, as the Lord said: “So it is, friends. The sphere of the Buddha is just like what you said. However, friends, their thoughts are dependently originated, and I see living beings who walks with desire and who stops without desire, who wears a dharma-robe being full of impurities and who puts on the robe without impurities, and who eats porridge out of greed and who stops it without appetite. O friends, the types of behavior of living beings are so diverse. Since there are living beings who strive for [the Buddha’s] words by understanding a condensed statement or by understanding  a full, detailed explanations (vipañcita-jña), the Tathāgata gives them the discourses of teaching the dharma (dharma-avatāraṇa-nirdeśa), accordingly to each individual”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Avataraṇa.—cf. gṛha-avataraṇa (IE 8-5), probably the same as umbara-bheda (q. v.). Note: avataraṇa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

avataraṇa : (nt.) descending; entering; plunging into.

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

avataraṇa (अवतरण).—n S Explanatory observations (upon a stanza or passage); annotations, exposition, comment. 2 Descending.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

avataraṇa (अवतरण).—n A quotation, an extract, Annotations, exposition, comment. Descending.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Avataraṇa (अवतरण).—

1) Descending for bathing in water &c. गङ्गा°, अप्सरस्तीर्थ° (gaṅgā°, apsarastīrtha°); descending; or alighting (in general), coming down; स्तन्य° (stanya°).

2) An incarnation; see अवतार (avatāra),

3) Crossing.

4) Sudden disappearance.

5) Steps or stairs leading to a river.

6) A holy bathing place (tīrtha).

7) Translating from one language into another.

8) Introduction.

9) An extract, a quotation.

-maṅgalam A solemn reception.

Derivable forms: avataraṇam (अवतरणम्).

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Avatāraṇa (अवतारण).—

1) Causing to descend.

2) Translation.

3) Possession by an evil spirit.

4) Worship, adoration.

5) The ends or border of a garment.

6) Preface or introduction (to a work).

7) Descent, appearance (avataraṇa); पौष्यं पौलोममास्तीकमादिरंशावतारणम् (pauṣyaṃ paulomamāstīkamādiraṃśāvatāraṇam) Mahābhārata (Bombay) 1.2.42.

Derivable forms: avatāraṇam (अवतारणम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Avataraṇa (अवतरण).—n. act., (1) overpowering, subduing, in dur-avataraṇa-, hard to overcome: Gaṇḍavyūha 242.6 -vīrya-karma-; (2) taking off, clipping (of hair), in keśāvataraṇaṃ (of a pro- spective monk) kṛtvā Mūla-Sarvāstivāda-Vinaya ii.140.2.

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Avatāraṇa (अवतारण).—nt. (to avatārayati, meaning 1), the causing to penetrate (intellectually), bringing to comprehension, usually in composition, preceded by the thing taught (or with loc.): tathāgatajñānāvatāraṇa- Saddharmapuṇḍarīka 3.2 (-kuśalair); 40.5 (-hetuni- mittaṃ); avatāraṇārthaṃ (sattvānāṃ; sc. regarding enlightenment) 318.4; karmakriyāvatāraṇārthaṃ Lalitavistara 251. 1—2; with loc., avatāraṇaṃ buddhaviṣaye Lalitavistara 423.13; avatāraṇāya to make them penetrate (religious knowledge) Bodhisattvabhūmi 308.11.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avataraṇa (अवतरण).—n.

(-ṇaṃ) 1. Descending, alighting. 2. Crossing. 3. Translating. 4. Quoting, citing. E. ava down, tṝ to cross, lyuṭ aff.

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Avatāraṇa (अवतारण).—n. (ṇaṃ) 1. Possession by an evil spirit. 2. The ends or border of a garment. 3. Worship, adoration. 4. Taking out. E. ava, tṝ to pass, in the causal form, and lyuṭ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avataraṇa (अवतरण).—i. e. ava-tṛ10 + ana, n. 1. Descending, [Śākuntala, (ed. Böhtlingk.)] 111, 3. 2. Descent especially of a deity from heaven, Mahābhārata 12, 12965.

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Avatāraṇa (अवतारण).—avatāraṇa,, i. e. ava-tṛ10 [Causal.] + ana, n. Causing to descend, [Rāmāyaṇa] 4, 56, 29.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Avataraṇa (अवतरण).—[neuter] descending, alighting.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Avataraṇa (अवतरण):—[=ava-taraṇa] [from ava-tṝ] n. descending, alighting, [Rāmāyaṇa; Śakuntalā]

2) [v.s. ...] ‘rushing away, sudden disappearance’, or for ava-tāraṇa See bhārāvat (cf. stanyāvataraṇa)

3) [v.s. ...] translating, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) Avatāraṇa (अवतारण):—[=ava-tāraṇa] [from ava-tṝ] n. causing to descend, [Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] taking or putting off, [Kādambarī]

6) [v.s. ...] ‘removing’ (as a burden) See bhārāvat, descent, appearance (= ava-taraṇa), [Mahābhārata i, 312 and 368], translation, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] worship, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] possession by an evil spirit, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] the border of a garment, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Avataraṇa (अवतरण):—[ava-taraṇa] (ṇaṃ) 1. n. Descending; crossing; translating; quoting.

2) Avatāraṇa (अवतारण):—[ava-tāraṇa] (ṇaṃ) 1. n. Being haunted; end of a garment; worship.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Avatāraṇa (अवतारण) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Avatāraṇa, Avayāraṇa, Uyāraṇa, Oaraṇa, Oāraṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Avatarana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Avataraṇa (अवतरण) [Also spelled avataran]:—(nm) descent; a passage; quotation; -[cihma] quotation marks (" ").

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Prakrit-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Prakrit glossary
Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Avatāraṇa (अवतारण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Avatāraṇa.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avatarana in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Avataraṇa (ಅವತರಣ):—

1) [noun] the act or fact of coming down.

2) [noun] a goḍs appearance in human form.

3) [noun] stairway, esp. one constructed of stone slabs for going down to reach the water in a pond, tank, etc. 4) a crossing over of a river.

4) [noun] the preparation and setting the background of the stage of a theatre for singers.

5) [noun] a passage selected or quoted from a book, article, etc.; an extraction or quotation from another source; an extract; an excerption.

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Avatāraṇa (ಅವತಾರಣ):—

1) [noun] the act of causing another come down.

2) [noun] the act of causing (a deity) incarnate on the earth.

3) [noun] the religious service offered to a god; worship.

4) [noun] a portion quoted from another book; an excerption.

5) [noun] the state of a person being possessed by an evil spirit.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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