Shimshapa, aka: Śiṃśapa, Śiṃśapā; 10 Definition(s)

Introduction

Shimshapa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śiṃśapa and Śiṃśapā can be transliterated into English as Simsapa or Shimshapa, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

One of the Hands indicating Trees.—Śimśapa, the Ardha-candra hands crossed.

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Shimshapa in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Śiṃśapā (शिंशपा) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “rosewood tree”, an evergreen rosewood tree from the Fabaceae (bean) family of flowering plants. In the Prakrit language, it is also known as Sīsavā or Sīsama. It is used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. The official botanical name is Dalbergia sissoo but is commonly referred to in English as “Sissoo” or “Indian redwood”. It is a deciduous timber-tree and grows up to 30m in height, has light yellow flowers and grows in lower Himalayas up to 1500 elevation. It is planted in North India and Bangladesh.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Śiṃśapā (शिंशपा) is a Sanskrit word, identified with Dalbergia sissoo (North Indian rosewood) by various scholars in their translation of the Śukranīti. This tree is mentioned as bearing good fruits. The King should plant such domestic plants in and near villages. He should nourish them by stoole of goats, sheep and cows, water as well as meat.

The following is an ancient Indian recipe for such nourishment of trees:

According to Śukranīti 4.4.105-109: “The trees (such as śiṃśapā) are to be watered in the morning and evening in summer, every alternate day in winter, in the fifth part of the day (i.e., afternoon) in spring, never in the rainy season. If trees have their fruits destroyed, the pouring of cold water after being cooked together with Kulutha, Māṣa (seeds), Mudga (pulse), Yava (barley) and Tila (oil seed) would lead to the growth of flowers and fruits. Growth of trees can be helped by the application of water with which fishes are washed and cleansed.”

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Shimshapa in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Śiṃśapa (शिंशप) is the name of a tree found in maṇidvīpa (Śakti’s abode), according to the Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa 12.10. Accordingly, these trees always bear flowers, fruits and new leaves, and the sweet fragrance of their scent is spread across all the quarters in this place. The trees (eg. Śiṃśapa) attract bees and birds of various species and rivers are seen flowing through their forests carrying many juicy liquids. Maṇidvīpa is defined as the home of Devī, built according to her will. It is compared with Sarvaloka, as it is superior to all other lokas.

The Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa, or Śrīmad-devī-bhāgavatam, is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, a type of Sanskrit literature containing cultural information on ancient India, religious/spiritual prescriptions and a range of topics concerning the various arts and sciences. The whole text is composed of 18,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 6th century.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śrīmad Devī Bhāgavatam
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Shimshapa in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Śiṃśapā (शिंशपा)—Sanskrit word for the plant “sīsū tree” (Dalbergia sissoo).

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Śiṃśapā (शिंशपा) is the name of a tree (Dalbergia Sisu) in the Rigveda and later. It is a stately and beautiful tree.

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Shimshapa in Jainism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Śiṃśapā (शिंशपा) refers to a kind of tree (vṛkṣa) commonly found in the forests (vaṇa) of ancient India, mentioned in the Jñātādharmakathāṅga-sūtra. Forests have been a significant part of the Indian economy since ancient days. They have been considered essential for economic development in as much as, besides bestowing many geographical advantages, they provide basic materials for building, furniture and various industries. The most important forest products are wood and timber which have been used by the mankind to fulfil his various needs—domestic, agricultural and industrial.

Different kinds of trees (eg., the Śiṃśapā tree) provided firewood and timber. The latter was used for furniture, building materials, enclosures, staircases, pillars, agricultural purposes, e. g. for making ploughs, transportation e. g. for making carts, chariots, boats, ships, and for various industrial needs. Vaṇa-kamma was an occupation dealing in wood and in various otherforest products. Iṅgāla-kamma was another occupation which was concerned with preparing charcoal from firewood.

Source: archive.org: Economic Life In Ancient India (as depicted in Jain canonical literature)
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Shimshapa or Ashoka is the name of a tree mentioned in the Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva (10th century A.D).—This was grown throughout Northern-India. An Ashoka tree on the bank of Godavari is also mentioned. Its another variety called as Lohitashoka or Raktashoka is mentioned.

Somadeva mentions many rich forests, gardens, various trees (eg., Shimshapa), creepers medicinal and flowering plants and fruit-bearing trees in the Kathasaritsagara. Travel through the thick, high, impregnable and extensive Vindhya forest is a typical feature of many travel-stories. Somadeva’s writing more or less reflects the life of the people of Northern India during the 11th century. His Kathasaritsagara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Shimshapa, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravahanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyadharas (celestial beings).

Source: Shodhganga: Cultural history as g leaned from kathasaritsagara
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Shimshapa in Marathi glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

śiṃśapā (शिंशपा).—f S A tree, Dalbergia Sisu.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Shimshapa in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Śiṃśapā (शिंशपा).—

1) Name of a tree (śiśu); शिंशपा कटुवा तिक्ता कषाया शोषकारिणी । उष्णवीर्या हरेन्मेदः कुष्ठचित्रवमिकृमीन् (śiṃśapā kaṭuvā tiktā kaṣāyā śoṣakāriṇī | uṣṇavīryā harenmedaḥ kuṣṭhacitravamikṛmīn) Bhāva P.

2) The Aśoka tree; (dadarśa) क्षामां स्वविरहव्याधिं शिंशपामूल- मास्थिताम् (kṣāmāṃ svavirahavyādhiṃ śiṃśapāmūla- māsthitām).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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