Pancashara, Pañcaśara, Pañcasāra, Pancasara, Pancan-shara, Pāñcaśara: 14 definitions

Introduction:

Pancashara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Pañcaśara and Pāñcaśara can be transliterated into English as Pancasara or Pancashara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

Alternative spellings of this word include Panchashara.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Pancashara in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर).—An epithet of the God of love; his dart is the twig of the mango, and his standard, the fish; his wife, Ratī and his friend, Madhu or the spring; also Pañcabāṇa and Madana.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 154. 207-9, 212.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of pancashara or pancasara in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Pancashara in Ayurveda glossary
Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Pañcasāra (पञ्चसार) refers to “five essences”, and represents a type of drink-preparation, mentioned in verse 3.31 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] One shall drink broth (that is) not too thick, rasālā, curds, raga and khāṇḍava syrup, or from clay shells, a five-essence [viz., pañcasāra] potion (that is) kept in a new vessel, mixed with small banana and coco-nut pieces, (and) acidulated, [...]”.

Note: Pānaka has been interchanged with its attribute pañcasāra and the following left untranslated. Yet it is not likely that the first pāda ran “pānakaṃ pañcasārdāhyaṃ” in the basic test, which (according to the apparatus critieus of K) is the reading of all manuscripts but one. Indu adduces another Nighaṇṭu-śloka:—“Prepared from grapes, mahua fruits, liquorice, jujubes, and pomegranates, the potion called ‘five essences’ [viz., pañcasāra] (is) eliminative of heat and thirst”.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Pañcasāra refers to a medicinal recipe mentioned in the Lehakhaṇḍa (verse 8.1) of the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Lehakhaṇḍa [mentioning pañcasāra] contains preparations of leha (linctus, i.e. medicine in the form of a syrup), āsava and gula; such recipes treat patients suffering from conditions such as intermittent fever, cough, hiccough, fever, dyspnoea, haemorrhagic diseases, pulmonary cavitation, tuberculosis, etc.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Discover the meaning of pancashara or pancasara in the context of Ayurveda from relevant books on Exotic India

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Acta Orientalia vol. 74 (2013): Historical sequence of the Vaiṣṇava Divyadeśas

Pañcasāra is short for Pañcasārakṣetra (Cēṟai), which refers to one of the 108 Vaishnava Divya Desam (divyadeśas or divyasthalas), located in the topographical division of Cōḻanāṭu (“Chola country”), according to the 9th century Nālāyirativviyappirapantam (shortly Nālāyiram).—Tradition would record the Vaiṣṇava divyadeśas or divyasthalas are 108. The divyadeśa is a base of the cult of Viṣṇu in Viṣṇuism [Vaiṣṇavism] tradition. The list of 108 [viz., Pañcasārakṣetra] seems to have reached maturation by about the early 9th century CE as all the deśas are extolled in the hymns of the twelve Āḻvārs.

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

Discover the meaning of pancashara or pancasara in the context of Vaishnavism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Pancashara in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर) refers to “five (glowing) arrows”, according to the 13th-century Matsyendrasaṃhitā: a Kubjikā-Tripurā oriented Tantric Yoga text of the Ṣaḍanvayaśāmbhava tradition from South India.—Accordingly, “[Visualisation of Parameśvara]:—[...] He is in the prime of his youth and has all the auspicious characteristics. He has the great Ajagava bow placed on his left side. On his right, he has five glowing arrows (ujjvalat-pañcaśara). He is shining like a blue lotus. On his chest there is a glittering garland of blue lotuses. He is the Lord. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of pancashara or pancasara in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Pancashara in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर).—epithets of the god of love; (so called because he has five arrows; their names are:-aravindamaśokaṃ ca cūtaṃ ca navamallikā | nīlotpalaṃ ca pañcaite pañcabāṇasya sāyakāḥ || the five arrows are also thus named:-saṃmohanonmādanau ca śoṣaṇastāpanastathā | stambhanaśceti kāmasya pañcabāṇāḥ prakīrtitāḥ ||).

Derivable forms: pañcaśaraḥ (पञ्चशरः).

Pañcaśara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms pañcan and śara (शर). See also (synonyms): pañceṣu, pañcabāṇa.

--- OR ---

Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर).—epithets of the god of love; see पञ्चेषु (pañceṣu).

Derivable forms: pañcaśaraḥ (पञ्चशरः).

Pañcaśara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms pañcan and śara (शर). See also (synonyms): pañcabāṇa, pañcavāṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर).—m.

(-raḥ) Kamadeva. E. pañca five, and śara an arrow: see the last.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर).—(having five arrows), m. Kāma, [Prabodhacandrodaya, (ed. Brockhaus.)] 72, 11.

Pañcaśara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms pañcan and śara (शर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर).—[masculine] = pañcabāṇa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Pañcasāra (पञ्चसार) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—vedānta. Oppert. Ii, 3416.
—by Śaṅkara Bhaṭṭa. Oppert. Ii, 8887.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर):—[=pañca-śara] [from pañca] m. = -bāṇa, [Prabodha-candrodaya] (f(ī). = -bāṇī, [Naiṣadha-carita])

2) Pañcasāra (पञ्चसार):—[=pañca-sāra] [from pañca] mfn. consisting of 5 parts or ingredients, [Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] n. (?) Name of [work]

4) Pāñcaśara (पाञ्चशर):—[=pāñca-śara] [from pāñca] mf(ī)n. belonging to the (5-arrowed) god of love, [Kathāsaritsāgara]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pañcaśara (पञ्चशर):—[pañca-śara] (raḥ) 1. m. Idem.

[Sanskrit to German]

Pancashara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of pancashara or pancasara in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: