Kaushika, aka: Kauśika, Kauśikā; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kaushika means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Kauśika and Kauśikā can be transliterated into English as Kausika or Kaushika, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana

Kaushika in Purana glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

1) Kauśika (कौशिक).—(Viśvāmitra). See under Viśvāmitra. (See full article at Story of Kauśika from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Kauśika (कौशिक).—A hermit who lived in the palace of Yudhiṣṭhira. It is mentioned in Mahābhārata, Udyoga Parva, Chapter 83, that while going to Hastināpura, Śrī Kṛṣṇa met this hermit on the way.

3) Kauśika (कौशिक).—A minister of Jarāsandha. It is mentioned in Mahābhārata, Sabhā Parva, Stanza 22, that he had another name Haṃsa also.

4) Kauśika (कौशिक).—While the Pāṇḍavas were leading forest life, the hermit Mārkaṇḍeya told the story of a noble Brahmin named Kauśika, to Dharmaputra. Once this Brahmin sat under a tree and performed penance. A small crane which sat on a branch of the tree passed excreta on the head of the Brahmin. He became angry and looked at the bird. Instantly the bird was reduced to ashes. The Brahmin sincerely repented and went to the countryside to live on alms. Once he reached the house of a Brahmin. The wife of the Brahmin came to the door and requested him to wait a bit. Immediately her husband arrived, and she, being engaged in looking after the needs of her husband forgot the Brahmin Kauśika, who became angry and spoke cruel words to her. She argued that the noblest deed was looking after one’s husband and that it was not meet and right for Brahmins to get angry. She advised Kauśika to go to Mithilāpurī and to receive advice from the famous Dharmavyādha. Kauśika repented his rash nature, went to Dharmavyādha and received advice from him. He returned home and lived peacefully with his parents. (Mahābhārata Vana Parva, ten chapters from 206).

Though a man of veracity, he finally had to go to hell, for the following reason. While he was engaged in penance in the forest some thieves came by that way with some stolen goods. The owners of the goods were chasing the thieves. Kauśika told them the way by which the thieves had gone. So at the end Kauśika was thrown into hell. (Mahābhārata Karṇa Parva, Chapter 69).

5) Kauśika (कौशिक).—A King of the Puru dynasty. Kapila was his father and Gṛtsapati was his brother. The four castes Brāhmaṇa, Kṣatriya, Vaiśya and Śūdra originated from Gṛtsapati. (Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 278).

6) Kauśika (कौशिक).—A hermit. This ancient hermit lived in Kurukṣetra. His sons Svasṛpa, Krodhana, Hiṃsra, Piśuna, Kavi, Vāgduṣṭa, and Pitṛvarttī lived with hermit Garga for learning under him. Their names indicated their character. Their father died. The sons were in poverty. At this time rain ceased altogether. Garga asked his disciples to take his milch cow to the forest for grazing. Owing to hunger the brothers decided to kill and eat the cow. But the youngest said: "If you are bent on killing the cow, we had better make use of it as an offering to the Manes, and no sin will visit us."

All agreed to this and Pitṛvarttī killed the cow and began the sacrifice. Two elder brothers were employed in worshipping the gods and three were detailed to give offerings to the manes. One was asked to be the guest. Pitṛvarttī was the sacrificer. Remembering the ancestors with reverence he began the sacrifice in accordance with the rites. Thus the seven hermits ate the cow and told Garga that the cow was caught by a tiger.

7) Kauśika (कौशिक).—A King. This king became a cock at night. His wife Viśālā was filled with grief at this transfiguration of her husband in the night. She told her grief to the hermit Gālava who told the queen about the previous birth of her husband as follows:—"In the previous birth he used to eat cocks to get strength. Knowing this Tāmracūḍa the king of fowls cursed him. "You shall become a cock during nights." That is why your husband has become a cock." According to the advice of the hermit the King began to worship Lord Śiva and he was liberated from the curse. (Skanda Purāṇa).

8) Kauśikā (कौशिका).—(GOMATĪ). A river. The hermitage of Viśvāmitra stood on the bank of this river. The modern name of river Kauśikā is Kosī. The river Kosī flows through Bihar. Those who bathe in this river will obtain remission of sins. See under Gomatī. (Mahābhārata Vana Parva, Chapter 84).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Kauśika (कौशिक).—A sage who called on dying Bhīṣma.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa I. 9. 7.

1b) Practised varma nārāyaṇātmaka and gave up his body. When Citraratha, the Gandharva crossed on his bones, he fell down to the earth, and on Vālakhilyas’ suggestion, he gathered them and throwing into the Sarasvatī, went away to his home.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 8. 38-40.

1c) A name of Indra.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 18. 64.

1d) A name of Viśvāmitra (Gādhi, Viṣṇu-purāṇa) helped the banished Satyavrata to get a place among the planets out of gratitude for his having helped Gālava during the 12 year famine.

1e) A nāga residing in Tatvalam.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 20. 19.

1f) A pupil of Kṛta.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 35. 53.

1g) A son of Vasudeva and Saivyā (Vaiśāli, vāyu-purāṇa.) adopted by his brother Vṛka,1 born of a Vaiśya wife.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 71. 174-5; 193; Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 182; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 15. 25.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 46. 20.

1h) A sage by tapas of the epoch of Sāvarṇi;1 a sage of Kurukṣetra who had seven sons who, during famine, had their guru's cow killed and after offering it for śrāddha, made a meal themselves; but after five rebirths they attained final beatitude. These five rebirths detailed.2

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 9. 32; 145. 93.
  • 2) Ib. 19. 12; Ch. 20.

1i) A son of Vidarbha and father of Cidī.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 95. 36, 38.

1j) A son of Vaiśākhi.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 172.

1k) Adopted son of Vastāvana.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 189.

1l) The kingdom of.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 121. 50.

2) Kauśikā (कौशिका).—The wife of Suhotra and mother of Janhu.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 91. 54.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Kauśika (कौशिक) refers to a variety of prāsāda (upper storey of any building), according to the Mayamata (18.13). In the Śilparatna (32.6), the Kamikāgama (57.8) and the Īśānaśiva (32-70), this variety is known as Kāśika.

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra
Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

Kaushika in Itihasa glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kauśika (कौशिक) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.13.20, II.48.17, VI.10.40). Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Kauśika) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
context information

Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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India history and geogprahy

Kauśika (कौशिक) or Kośika is the name of a river found in India.—Mr. K. M. Gupta identifies it with modem Kusiyara, a river tothe east of Pañcakhaṇḍa In the Sylhet district. The river Kauśika became so much denudded of its current that it gets the qualifying term śuṣka (dried) prefixed to it.

Source: archive.org: Geography in Ancient Indian inscriptions
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kaushika in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kauśika (कौशिक).—a. (- f.) also -कौषिक (kauṣika) () [कुश-ठञ्, कुशिकअण् वा (kuśa-ṭhañ, kuśikaaṇ vā)]

1) Incased, sheathed; विक्रम्य कौशिकं खङ्गं मोक्षयित्वा ग्रहं रिपोः (vikramya kauśikaṃ khaṅgaṃ mokṣayitvā grahaṃ ripoḥ) Mb.3.157.11.

2) Coming from an owl.

3) Born of the family of Kuśika; कौशिकाश्च कथं वंशात्क्षत्राद्वै ब्राह्मणो भवेत् (kauśikāśca kathaṃ vaṃśātkṣatrādvai brāhmaṇo bhavet) Mb.13.52.4.

4) Silken; या त्वाहं कौशिकैर्वस्त्रैः शुभ्रैराच्छादितं पुरा (yā tvāhaṃ kauśikairvastraiḥ śubhrairācchāditaṃ purā) Mb.3.27.14.

-kaḥ

1) An epithet of विश्वा- मित्र (viśvā- mitra) q. v.

2) An owl; U.2.29.

3) A lexicographer.

4) Marrow.

5) Bdellium.

6) An ichneumon.

7) A snake-catcher.

8) The sentiment of love (śṛṅgāra).

9) One who knows hidden treasures.

10) An epithet of Indra; Bhāg.1.38.17; N.5.64.

11) An epithet of Śiva.

12) Name of a priest in charge of Sāmaveda.

13) A dealer in Kuśa grass.

14) Gum, resin; 'कौशिको मुनिभेदे च नकुले शक्रघूकयोः । उद्गातरि कुशाजीवे कोशवत्यहितुण्डिके ॥ गुग्गुलावपि (kauśiko munibhede ca nakule śakraghūkayoḥ | udgātari kuśājīve kośavatyahituṇḍike || guggulāvapi) ...'

-kā A cup, drinking vessel.

-kam

1) Silk, silken garment; Mb.13.111.14; Bhāg.1.83.28.

2) A way of flying (sarvatobhadra); Mb.7.48.35.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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