Ishvarasamhita, Īśvarasaṃhitā, Ishvara-samhita: 4 definitions

Introduction

Ishvarasamhita means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Īśvarasaṃhitā can be transliterated into English as Isvarasamhita or Ishvarasamhita, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

[«previous (I) next»] — Ishvarasamhita in Pancaratra glossary
Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 1

Īśvarasaṃhitā (ईश्वरसंहिता) is an important text of the Pāñcarātra School and is followed meticulously for conduction of daily pūjā ceremony and performances of various religious festivals in the Nārāyaṇasvāmi temple of Melkote. It can safely be dated to 8th-9th Century at least on the basis of its reference in the Āgama Prāmāṇya of Śrī Yāmunācārya. It is supposed to be a simpler and smaller version of the older Sātvatāsaṃhitā of this school which is the earliest available work of Pāñcarātra and is considered as one of three ratnas, (Jewels), along with Pauṣkara- and Jaya Saṃhitās. In 25 long adhyāyas the Īśvarasaṃhitā describes in great details the rites, rituals and ceremonies taking place (or ought to take place) in a Vaiṣṇava temple.

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (pancaratra)

Īśvarasaṃhitā (ईश्वरसंहिता) or simply Īśvara is the name of a Vaiṣṇava Āgama scripture, classified as a sāttvika type of the Muniprokta group of Pāñcarātra Āgamas. The vaiṣṇavāgamas represent one of the three classes of āgamas (traditionally communicated wisdom).—Texts of the Pāñcara Āgamas are divided in to two sects. It is believed that Lord Vāsudeva revealed the first group of texts which are called Divya and the next group is called Muniprokta which are further divided in to three viz. a. Sāttvika (eg., Īśvarasaṃhitā-saṃhitā). b. Rājasa. c. Tāmasa.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

Discover the meaning of ishvarasamhita or isvarasamhita in the context of Pancaratra from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Hinduism)

[«previous (I) next»] — Ishvarasamhita in Hinduism glossary
Source: Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts: Hinduism

The Īśvarasaṃhitā is an important text of the Pāñcarātra school and is followed meticulously for the conduction of daily Pūjā ceremony and performances of various religious festivals in the Nārāyaṇasvāmī temple of Melkore. It can safely be dated to eighth-ninth century at least on the basis of its reference in the Āgama Prāmāṇya of Śrī Yāmunācārya. It is supposed to be a simpler and smaller version of the older Sāttvata-Saṃhitā of this school which is the earliest available work of Pāñcarātra and is considered as one of three ratnas Uewels), along with Pau kara­ and Jayā-Saṃhitās. In twenty-five long Adhyāyas the Īśvarasaṃhitā describes in great detail the rites, rituals and ceremonies taking place (or ought to take place) in a Vaiṣṇava temple.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

[«previous (I) next»] — Ishvarasamhita in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Īśvarasaṃhitā (ईश्वरसंहिता) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Oppert. Ii, 3972.
—[commentary] Ii, 3973. Quoted by Raghunandana in Tithitattva.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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