Sancaya, Sañcaya, Saṃcaya, Samcaya, Samcaya: 23 definitions

Introduction:

Sancaya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Sanchaya.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Sañcaya (सञ्चय, “accumulation”):—The first of the six stages of Saṃprāpti (‘pathogenesis’).—It is a Sanskrit technical term used throughout Ayurvedic (India medicine) literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. Saṃprāpti is an important clue for medical diagnosis (nidāna).

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Saṃcaya (संचय):—Accumalation of vitiated Doṣas in their own seats. First stage of Kriyākāla.

Source: Indian Journal of History of Science: Jvaranirnaya: a rare monograph on diagnosis of fevers from the pre-colonial era

Saṃcaya (संचय) refers to the “stage of accumulation (of Doṣa)”, according to the Jvaranirṇaya: an Ayurvedic manuscript dealing exclusively with types of jvara (fevers) written by Sri Nārāyaṇa Paṇḍita in the 16th century CE.—The causes for endogenous fevers (nija-jvara) are explained in different stages like: [e.g., stage of accumulation of doṣa (doṣa-saṃcaya)] [...] It is mentioned that in the stage of Caya, there is dislike towards similar attributes (guṇa) and liking/affinity towards dissimilar guṇa. This feature is exhibited in mild (hīna) form, in the stage of Prakopa it is in moderate (madhyama) form and in the stage of Prasāra it is in severe (vṛddha) form.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Saṃcaya (संचय).—A collection or a group; cf. वर्णसंचय (varṇasaṃcaya) which means अक्षरसमाम्नाय (akṣarasamāmnāya) or alphabet.

Vyakarana book cover
context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Saṃcaya (संचय) refers to a “collection” (e.g., of flowers and fruits), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.12.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “Then, the delighted lord of the mountains, took some fresh flowers and fruits with him [i.e., sat-puṣpaphala-saṃcaya] and approached Śiva along with his daughter. Approaching the lord of the three worlds, engaged in meditation and bowing to Him he mentally dedicated to Him, his wonderful daughter. Placing the fruits and flowers in front of Him and making his daughter stand before Him, the lord of the mountains spoke to Śiva:—[...]”.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Sañcaya (सञ्चय) refers to a “collection” (of sacrificial substances), according to the Kularatnoddyota verse 2.12-20.—Accordingly, “O one of good vows, I have talked about Ādinātha and the goddess who originates from his body. When he had enacted this most excellent union with her and externalized all the Kramamaṇḍala from his body, the lord of the gods worshipped it. (He did so) along with the mantras and Vidyās and (their) limbs with heaps of the aforementioned sacrificial substances as divine offerings (dravya-sañcayaupahāravarair divyaiḥ pūrvoktair dravyasañcayaiḥ) and with lamps of many forms fed by the Great Clarified Butter (made from human fat). (He also made) food offerings born from the energy of his will, (with many kinds of) human flesh, divine offerings of flowers and tasty food, (each offered) separately”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sancaya in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sañcaya : (m.) accumulation; quantity.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Sañcaya, (fr. saṃ+ci) accumulation, quantity Sn. 697; It. 17 (aṭṭhi°); Miln. 220. (Page 669)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sañcaya (संचय).—m (S) A collection, accumulation, aggregation, heap.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

sañcaya (संचय).—m A collection, accumulation, heap.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃcaya (संचय).—

1) Heaping up, gathering.

2) Hoard, heap, accumulation, stock, store; कर्तव्यः संचयो नित्यं कर्तव्यो नाति- संचयः (kartavyaḥ saṃcayo nityaṃ kartavyo nāti- saṃcayaḥ) Subhāṣ.

3) A large quantity, collection.

4) Joint; दोर्निष्पेषविशीर्णसंचयदलत्कङ्कालमुन्मथ्नतः (dorniṣpeṣaviśīrṇasaṃcayadalatkaṅkālamunmathnataḥ) Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 8.9.

Derivable forms: saṃcayaḥ (संचयः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Saṃcaya (संचय).—(in this special sense peculiar to [Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit]; in Pali represented by ācaya, see Critical Pali Dictionary, [Pali Text Society’s Pali-English Dictionary] s.v. apacaya), accumulation of evil karma, or of worldliness; opp. of apacaya, q.v.: (iyaṃ dṛṣṭiḥ…) saṃcayāya nāpacayāya …saṃvartate Avadāna-śataka ii.188.9—10 (em., proved by the next); …apacayāya na saṃcayāya…saṃvartate 189.6. For Pali parallel see e.g. Vin. ii.259.5 apacayāya…no ācayāya.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sañcaya (सञ्चय).—m.

(-yaḥ) 1. Heap, quantity, number, multitude. 2. Gathering. E. sam together, ci to collect, aff. ac .

--- OR ---

Sañcāya (सञ्चाय) or Sañcāyya.—m.

(-yaḥ) A particular sacrifice, at which the juice of the acid Asclepias is drank. E. sam together, ci to collect, participial aff. ṇyat, form irr., āya being substituted for the regular change: see sañceya .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃcaya (संचय).—i. e. sam-ci + a, m. 1. Collection, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 3. 2. Heaping up, accumulation, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 158; [Hitopadeśa] i. [distich] 159, M. M. 3. Being constructed, built, [Pañcatantra] 33, 6. 4. Heap, [Pañcatantra] 175, 2 (kāṣṭha-, pl. A funeral pile). 5. Multitude, [Mālatīmādhava, (ed. Calc.)] 14, 6; quantity, [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 142.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃcaya (संचय).—[masculine] heaping up, gathering, heap, store, wealth, collection, multitude.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Saṃcaya (संचय):—[=saṃ-caya] a etc. See saṃ- √1. ci.

2) [=saṃ-caya] [from saṃ-ci] b m. (ifc. f(ā). ) collection, gathering, accumulation, heap, hoard, store, multitude, quantity ([dative case], ‘in order to have more’), [Nirukta, by Yāska; Mahābhārata] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] collecting the bones of a burnt body (in asthi-s), [Religious Thought and Life in India 284; 300]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sañcaya (सञ्चय):—[sa-ñcaya] (yaḥ) 1. m. Heap, quantity, number.

2) Sañcāya (सञ्चाय):—[sa-ñcāya] (yyaḥ) 1. m. A particular sacrifice at which the juice of the acid Asclepias is drunk.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saṃcaya (संचय) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Saṃcaya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sancaya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sancaya in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Saṃcaya (संचय) [Also spelled sanchay]:—(nm) accumulation, collection: reserve, deposit; hoard; hence ~[na] (nm); ~[śīla] (a); ~[śīlatā] (nf).

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Saṃcaya (संचय) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Saṃcaya.

2) Saṃcāya (संचाय) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Saṃśak.

3) Saṃcāya (संचाय) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Saṃtyāga.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Saṃcaya (ಸಂಚಯ):—

1) [noun] a gathering, collection of people, things or animals.

2) [noun] the act of gathering, collecting.

3) [noun] accumulated money or things.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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