The Shiva Purana (English translation)

by J. L. Shastri | 1970 | 616,585 words

This page relates “shiva-himavat dialogue” as found in the Shiva-purana, which, in Hinduism, represents one of the eighteen Mahapuranas. This work eulogizes Lord Shiva as the supreme deity, besides topics such as cosmology and philosophy. It is written in Sanskrit and claims to be a redaction of an original text consisting of 100,000 metrical verses.

Chapter 12 - Śiva-Himavat dialogue

Brahmā said:—

1. Then, the delighted lord of the mountains, took some fresh flowers and fruits with him and approached Śiva along with his daughter.

2. Approaching the lord of the three worlds, engaged in meditation and bowing to Him he mentally dedicated to Him, his wonderful daughter.

3. Placing the fruits and flowers in front of Him and making his daughter stand before Him, the lord of the mountains spoke to Śiva.

Himācala said:—

4. O lord, my daughter who is eager to serve you, the moon-crested lord, I have brought here with a desire to propitiate you.

5. Let her serve you, the benefactor, for ever, along with two of her maids. O lord, if you wish to bless me, please permit her.

Brahmā said:—

6-10. Then Śiva looked at her in the first flush of her youth. Her complexion resembled the full blown blue lotus petals. Her face appeared as the full moon. Her auspicious dress and features were the repositories of all graceful charms. Her neck had the shape of the conch-shell. Her eyes were wide and her ears shone exquisitely. On either side, her long-rounded arms resembling a lotus-stalk shone beautifully. Her two breasts resembling lotus-buds were stout, plump and firm. Her waist was slender and the curly locks of her hair shone well. Her feet resembled the land-lotus and were comely in appearance. She was competent to shake the minds of even the sages deeply engrossed in meditation, even at the very sight. She was a crest-jewel of all the maidens in the world.

11-12. On seeing her in that exquisite form as increased the pleasure and love of even those who meditate, the great Yogin Śiva closed His eyes immediately and meditated upon His real form, the great principle that is beyond the three attributes and is imperishable.

13-14. On seeing Śiva the lord of all, the chief of those devoted to penance, the lord with the moon as his ornament, who can be known through spiritual insight and who was sitting in the meditative posture closing His eyes, Himācala saluted Him again. Though he was not disheartened, he entertained some doubts. Thus he, the lord of mountains, foremost of the eloqueut, spoke to Śiva, the sole kinsman of the universe.

Himācala said:—

15. O great lord of the gods, O Śiva, the merciful, O lord, open your eyes and look at me who have sought refuge in you.

16. O Śiva, O great lord, the delighter ofthe universe, O great God, I bow to you who destroy all adversities.

17. O lord of gods, the Vedas and the sacred lore do

not know you entirely. Your greatness is beyond the sphere of words and minds, inexpressible by means of words and incomprehensible.

18. Not to speak of others, even the Vedas describe you with awe and timidity not positively but negating what you are not.

19. Securing your grace through devotion, many devotees become acquainted with you. Seeking refuge in you they get correct knowledge about your real self.

20. Please listen to my entreaty with a long heart. I am your slave. O dear lord, in humility I shall explain the same to you.

21. O great god Śiva, by your favour I feel most fortunate. O lord, consider me your slave and be sympathetic towards me. Obeisance to you.

22. O lord, I shall be visiting you daily along with my daughter. O lord, be pleased to command me accordingly.

Brahmā said:—

23. On hearing his words, the great lord of the gods broke His meditation, opened His eyes, thought a little and spoke.

Lord Śiva said:—

24. “O mountain, you shall come every day to see me, leaving your daughter in your abode. Otherwise I cannot be seen”

Brahmā said:—

25. On hearing the words of Śiva in that view, the father of Śivā the mountain, bowed his head and replied to Śiva.

Himācala said:—

26. “Let this be kindly mentioned why this girl cannot accompany me here. Is she unworthy of your service? I do not know the reason thereof.”

Brahmā said:—

27. Particularly pointing out the worldly conduct of fake ascetics, the bull-bannered god Śiva laughingly spoke to the mountain.

Śiva said:—

28. This auspicious slender-bodied maiden of comely hips and moon-like face should not be brought near me. I forbid you again and again.

29. A woman is a phase of illusion. As the scholars who have mastered the Vedas say particularly, a young damsel is a hindrance to ascetics.

30. O mountain, I am an ascetic, a yogin, never affected by illusion. Of what avail is a woman thrust on me?

31. O friend resorted to by great ascetics, you shall not say so again, since you are an adept in Vedic religion, a scholar and one foremost among the wise.

32. O mountain, by contact with a woman, worldliness springs up; non-attachment perishes and the virtuous penance is destroyed.

33. Hence, O mountain, no ascetic shall have any truck with women. A woman is the root of all worldly attachments. She destroys all wisdom and detachment together.

Brahmā said:—

34. Speaking these and many other similar things to the lord of mountains, lord Śiva the great Yogin, stopped.

35. On hearing these ruthless words of Śiva free from sickness and desire, the father of Pārvatī became nervous, O celestial sage, and a little agitated. But he kept quiet.

36. On hearing the words of the ascetic and finding her father, the lord of the mountains, frightened, Pārvatī bowed to Śiva and spoke these words clearly.