Samakirna, Samākīrṇa, Sam-akirna: 6 definitions

Introduction:

Samakirna means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Samakirna in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Samākīrṇa (समाकीर्ण) refers to that which “abounds in” (i.e., trees—a mountain abounds in trees), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.1.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] O excellent sage, there in the northern region is a mountain called Himavat who is the lord of mountains and has great splendour and prosperity. [...] He abounds (i.e., samākīrṇa) in various trees. Being of variegated shape and features he is adorned by many peaks on him. Lions, tigers and other animals frequent it. Many happy persons live there for ever. He is the storehouse of snow (and yet) very fierce. He is the resort of wonderful things. He is resorted to by the gods, sages and seers. He is a great favourite of Śiva”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Samakirna in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Samākīrṇa (समाकीर्ण) refers to “that which is filled with”, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “(Pūrṇagiri) is on the northern peak of Kailāśa and is full of countless flames. [...] That divine city of the supreme Lord is made of pillars of adamantine. It is surrounded by temple arches and palaces of the Fire of Time. It is filled with many forms [i.e., bahurūpa-samākīrṇa] and adorned with knowledge and (divine) qualities. Possessing many wonders, it is life itself in the triple universe. (All) this is filled by it and so it is called 'Full' (pūrṇa i.e. Pūrṇagiri). (The Fire of Time) has seven tongues (of flame; his) form is Time and has six faces. Possessing the Full Moon, (he) is beautiful. (He is) the Great Vitality, holds a spear and brings about creation and destruction”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Samakirna in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Samākīrṇa (समाकीर्ण) refers to “(that forest which is) full of (animals)”, according to the Guhyasūtra chapter 3.—Accordingly, “[...] One may perform the Block-of-Wood Observance in a forest full of (samākīrṇa/samākula) bears, tigers and lions, conquering the urges to sleep and eat, [constantly] reciting. If one takes on the appearance of a woman and sings and dances, adorned with bracelets, with a winnowing fan, ball and plait, one observes the Colourful Observance. With a weapon in hand, full of compassion, if one wanders like a saviour of creatures (?) focussed upon recitation, meditation and worship, one performs the Warrior Observance. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Samakirna in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Samākīrṇa (समाकीर्ण) refers to “teeming with (life)”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “One of confused intelligence does not perceive his own death as [he does the death] of another like the one staying in a tree in a burning forest that is teeming with life (sattva-samākīrṇavane sattvasamākīrṇe dahyamāne). As the young so the old, as the rich so the poor, as the brave so the cowardly—Yama devours [all] equally”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samakirna in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Samākīrṇa (समाकीर्ण):—[=sam-ākīrṇa] [from samā-kṝ] mfn. strewn over, bestrewed, completely covered, overspread, [ib.]

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samakirna in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Samākīrṇa (ಸಮಾಕೀರ್ಣ):—[adjective] filled with; abounding with.

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Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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