Salila, Salilā: 25 definitions

Introduction:

Salila means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Salil.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Salilā (सलिला) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (e.g., Salilā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Salilā (सलिला).—A mind-born mother.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 20.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jyotiṣa

Salila (सलिल, “rainfall”) refers to the twenty-fourth chapter of the Gārgīyajyotiṣa. The Gārgīyajyotiṣa is one of the most comprehensive of Garga’s texts and written in the form of a dialogue between Krauṣṭuki (Ṛṣiputra) and Garga discussing astral and other omens, comprising a total of sixty-two chapters (viz., salila), known as aṅgas and summarized in the Aṅgasamuddiśa (“enumeration of the divisions”, introductory portion).

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Salila (सलिल) refers to “rain”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If, when the rays are turned away from the earth the colour of the sun be that of copper the commander-in-chief [i.e., senāpati] dies; if it be green or yellow the king’s son dies; if it be white the royal chaplain dies. If the sun (āditya) be variegated in colour or of the colour of smoke there will be either immediate rain [i.e., salila] or mankind will suffer from robbers and from weapons”.

Source: Google Books: Studies in the History of the Exact Sciences (Astronomy)

Salila (सलिल) refers to “water”, according to the Ghaṭikāyantraghaṭanāvidhi, an unpublished manuscript describing the ritual connected with the setting up of the water clock and its invocation.—Accordingly, “[...] Now the characteristics of the ground on which the water clock is to be set up. On a ground, sloped to the east and north, which has been smeared with cow-dung, a vessel called kuṇḍa, faultless (avraṇa) and auspicious, should be placed ... upon grains of rice and should be encircled with thread dyed in saffron; then it should be filled with clear water. The water clock (i.e. the bowl) should be placed on the placid water [i.e., salilaniścale salile] in the basin, when the Sun’s orb is half visible, after worshipping Gaṇeśa and the Sun, and after bowing to the teacher and to the personal deity. [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Shodhganga: Dietetics and culinary art in ancient and medieval India

Salila (सलिल) refers to “water” and is mentioned in a list of remedies for indigestion in the 17th century Bhojanakutūhala (dravyaguṇāguṇa-kathana), and is commonly found in literature dealing with the topics of dietetics and culinary art, also known as Pākaśāstra or Pākakalā.—A complete section in Bhojanakutūhala is devoted for the description of agents that cause indigestion [viz., piṣṭānna (grained food) or priyāla fruit or māṣa (urud dal)]. These agents consumed on a large scale can cause indigestion for certain people. The remedies [viz., salila (water)] for these types of indigestions are also explained therewith.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Kavya (poetry)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Salila (सलिल) refers to the “water”, according to Kālidāsa’s Raghuvaṃśa verse 8.3-4.—Accordingly: “Having experienced his great consecration with water (salila) gathered by Vasiṣṭha, the earth seemed to express her contentment with clear sighs. When the ritual had been performed for him by the guru who knew the Atharvaveda, he became unassailable by his enemies, for when Brahman is united with the power of weapons it is a union of wind and fire”.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (architecture)

Salila (सलिल) refers to “water”, according to the Devyāmata (chapter 105).—Accordingly, [while describing the layout of the residence (gṛha) for the prāsādāśramin]—“[...] Storage for gems, gold and cloths is recommended in the east, and for water (salila-sthāpana) in the south and centre. Grain storage is recommended in the west. In the northwest is storage for the mortar. [...]”.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Bibliotheca Polyglotta: Ratnagotravibhāga (Uttaratantra)

Salila (सलिल) refers to “rain”, according to the 3rd-century Ratnagotravibhāga (Uttaratantra) verse 4.43-44.—“[...] it is said that [the mind of the Buddha in its activity] is like a cloud (megha). Just as, in the rainy season, the clouds discharge, without any effort, The multitudes of water on the earth, Causing abundance of harvest; In a similar manner, the Buddha Discharges the rain (salila) of the Highest Doctrine (saddharma) From the clouds of Compassion, with no searching thought, For [bringing] the crops of virtue among the living beings. Just as the clouds discharge the rain (salila), agitated by the wind, upon the earth where The people behave in the path of virtuous actions; Similarly, the cloud that is the Buddha Pours the rain of the Highest Doctrine As the virtues are increased in the world Owing to the wind of Compassion”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

salila : (nt.) water.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Salila, (nt.) (cp. Sk. salila, to sarati1) water Sn. 62, 319, 672; J i. 8; v. 169; VvA. 41; PvA. 157; Nd2 665 (“vuccati udakaŋ”); Miln. 132 (written saliḷa); Sdhp. 168. It is also adj. salilaŋ āpo flowing water J vi. 534; cp. Miln. 114: na tā nadiyo dhuva — salilā.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

salīla (सलील).—a S (sa & līlā) Playful, sportive, gambolsome, full of fun and frolic.

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salīla (सलील).—a ( A) Facile, easy.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

salīla (सलील).—a Playful; facile, easy.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Salila (सलिल).—[salati-gacchati nimnaṃ sal-ilac Uṇādi-sūtra 1.54]

1) Water; सुभगसलिलावगाहाः (subhagasalilāvagāhāḥ) Ś.1.3.

2) The constellation उत्तराषाढा (uttarāṣāḍhā).

Derivable forms: salilam (सलिलम्).

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Salīla (सलील).—a. Sportive, wanton, amorous; सलीलयातानि न भर्तुरभ्रमोः (salīlayātāni na bharturabhramoḥ) Śiśupālavadha 1.52.

-lam ind.

1) Playfully.

2) Affectionately.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Salila (सलिल).—(sa-lila), adj. [bahuvrīhi] (m.c. for °līla), graceful, charming. Mahāvastu ii.142.8 (verse).

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Salīla (सलील).—pl., name of a brahmanical gotra: Divyāvadāna 635.12.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Salila (सलिल).—n.

(-laṃ) Water. E. ṣal to go, ilac Unadi aff.

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Salīla (सलील).—mfn.

(-laḥ-lā-laṃ) Wanton, sportive. E. sa for saha with, līlā sport.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Salila (सलिल).— (vb. sṛ, cf. sara), n. Water, [Pañcatantra] 165, 7.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Salila (सलिल).—[adjective] waving, flowing, inconstant; [neuter] flood, stream, water.

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Salīla (सलील).—[adjective] sporting, playful; [neuter] [adverb]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Salila (सलिल):—[from sal] mf(ā)n. (cf. sarira) flowing, surging, fluctuating, unsteady, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda; Maitrāyaṇī-saṃhitā]

2) Salilā (सलिला):—[from salila > sal] f. (in Sāṃkhya) one of the four kinds of ādhyātmikā tuṣṭi or internal acquiescence (the other three being ambhas, ogha, and vṛṣṭi; cf. su-pārā), [Tattvasamāsa]

3) Salila (सलिल):—[from sal] n. (ifc. f(ā). ) flood, surge, waves, [Ṛg-veda; Atharva-veda; Brāhmaṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] (also [plural]) water ([accusative] with √kṛ, ‘to offer a libation of water to [gen.]’), [Kauśika-sūtra; Mahābhārata] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] rainwater, rain, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

6) [v.s. ...] eye-water, tears, [Meghadūta]

7) [v.s. ...] a kind of wind (See -vāta)

8) [v.s. ...] a [particular] high number, [Śāṅkhāyana-śrauta-sūtra]

9) [v.s. ...] a kind of metre, [Nidāna-sūtra]

10) Salīla (सलील):—[=sa-līla] [from sa > sa-lakṣa] mf(ā)n. playing, sporting (not in earnest), [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa]

11) [v.s. ...] mocking, sneering, [Rāmāyaṇa]

12) [v.s. ...] sportive, coquettish, [Śakuntalā; Kathāsaritsāgara]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Salila (सलिल):—(laṃ) 1. n. Water.

2) Salīla (सलील):—[(laḥ-lā-laṃ) a.] Sportive.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Salila (सलिल) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Salila, Salilā.

[Sanskrit to German]

Salila in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Salila (सलिल) [Also spelled salil]:—(nm) water.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Salila (सलिल) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Salila.

2) Salilā (सलिला) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Salilā.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Salila (ಸಲಿಲ):—

1) [noun] water.

2) [noun] (pros.) a metrical foot consisting of one short followed by two long syllabic instants (u—); bacchius.

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Salīla (ಸಲೀಲ):—

1) [adjective] full of hearty, playful good humor; genial and gay; jovial.

2) [adjective] persistently carrying out of one’s own will or wishes, even when in conflict with others; self-willed.

3) [adjective] pleasing; lovely; beautiful.

4) [adjective] that can be done, got, mastered, endured, etc. with ease; not difficult; not exacting; easy.

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Salīla (ಸಲೀಲ):—[adverb] in an easy manner; with little or no difficulty, discomfort, awkwardness, etc.; easily.

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Saḷiḷa (ಸಳಿಳ):—

1) [noun] (correctly, ಸಲಿಲ [salila]) water.

2) [noun] (pros.) a metrical foot consisting of one short followed by two long syllabic instants (u—); bacchius.

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Saḷīla (ಸಳೀಲ):—

1) [adjective] full of hearty, playful good humor; genial and gay; jovial.

2) [adjective] persistently carrying out of one’s own will or wishes, even when in conflict with others; self-willed.

3) [adjective] pleasing; lovely; beautiful.

4) [adjective] that can be done, got, mastered, endured, etc. with ease; not difficult; not exacting; easy.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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