Prahasta; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Prahasta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Katha (narrative stories)

Prahasta in Katha glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Prahasta (प्रहस्त) is the son of one of the ministers of king Candraprabha, appointed to his son, Sūryaprabha, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 44. Accordingly, as Vajraprabha said to Naravāhanadatta: “... and then, when he [Sūryaprabha] was sixteen years old, and captivated the subjects by his virtues, his father, Candraprabha, appointed him Crown Prince, and he gave him the sons of his own ministers, many in number, Bhāsa, Prabhāsa, Siddhārtha, Prahasta and others”.

In chapter 47, Prahasta is considered a leader of hosts of transcendent warriors (atiratha) in Sunītha and Sūryaprabha’s army. Accordingly, as the Asura Maya explained the arrangement of warriors in Sunītha’s army: “... And his ministers Prahasta and Mahārtha are leaders of hosts of transcendent warriors”.

The story of Prahasta was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Prahasta, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Prahasta in Purana glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Prahasta (प्रहस्त).—A minister of Rāvaṇa. Genealogy. Descending in order from Viṣṇu—Brahmā—Heti—Vidyutkeśa—Sukeśa—Sumālī—Prahasta.

The demon Sukesa got of his wife Devavatī three sons named Mālyavān, Sumālī and Mālī. Of these Sumālī got of his wife Ketumatī ten sons named Prahasta, Akampana, Vikaṭa, Kālakāmukha, Dhūmrākṣa, Daṇḍa, Supārśva, Saṃhrāda, Prakvāta and Bhāsakarṇa and four daughters named Vekā, Puṣpotkaṭā, Kaikasi and Kumbhīnasī. Most of the sons were the ministers of Rāvaṇa. Other details.

(i) Prahasta was the chief minister of Rāvaṇa. (Uttara Rāmāyaṇa).

(ii) In the Rāma-Rāvaṇa battle Prahasta fought against Vibhīṣaṇa and was killed by the latter. (Śloka 4, Chapter 286, Vana Parva). (See full article at Story of Prahasta from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Prahasta (प्रहस्त).—A Rākṣasa who was killed in the Lankā war.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 10. 18.

1b) A son of Puṣpotkaṭa and Viśravas.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 8. 55; Vāyu-purāṇa 70. 49.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Prahasta in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Prahasta (प्रहस्‍त): Means long-head, One of Ravana's generals.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Prahasta in Jainism glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Prahasta (प्रहस्त) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Prahasta] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Prahasta in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Prahasta (प्रहस्त).—

1) The open hand with the fingers extended.

2) Name of a general of Rāvaṇa.

Derivable forms: prahastaḥ (प्रहस्तः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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Danda
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Prabhāsa (प्रभास) is the son of one of the ministers of king Candraprabha, appointed to his son...
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Siddhārtha (सिद्धार्थ) is the son of one of the ministers of king Candraprabha, appointed to hi...
Akampana
Ākampana (आकम्पन).—n. (-naṃ) Shaking, trembling. E. āṅ before kapi to tremble, lyuṭ aff.
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Ketumati
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