Prahlada, aka: Prahlāda, Prāhlāda; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Prahlada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Prahlāda (प्रह्लाद) is the name of a daitya chief, presiding over Paratāla, according to the Parākhyatantra 5.44-45. Paratāla (also called Varatāla) refers to one of the seven pātālas (‘subterranean paradise’). The word pātāla in this tantra refers to subterranean paradises for seekers of otherworldly pleasures and each the seven pātālas is occupied by a regent of the daityas, nāgas and rākṣasas.

The Parākhyatantra is an old Śaiva-siddhānta tantra dating from before the 10th century.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śaivism
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Purana

1a) Prahlāda (प्रह्लाद).—(also Prahrāda): son of Hiraṇyakaśipu and Kayādhu, a dānavī;1 a devotee and attendant of Hari; of Narasimha and Kṛṣṇa in Harivarṣa,2 Lord of the Daityas and Dānavas;2 most righteous of Hiraṇyakaśipu's sons, a Mahābhāgavata and a Mahātma,3 Dattātreya was a tutor: Saṇḍa and Marka, sons of Śukra, were his tutors to teach him kingly policy and Trivarga;4 served as calf for the Asuras to milk liquor from the earth;5 one of the twelve, who knew the dharma ordained by Hari;6 at the repeated tests of his father he spoke of the nine ways of devotion to Hari; was ordered to be killed, by being trodden by elephants, or to be done to death by poison, fire or water; all these were of no avail; he was then bound by noose; Prahlāda once lectured to his playmates and classmates on the importance of devotion to Hari even from childhood as it is rare to be born a man, and even as a man one half of the life is wasted in sleep and one quarter in old age; once one got into the groove of saṃsāra it was not possible to get out of it; so he asked them to aim at knowledge following the pure bhāgavata dharma; asked by the Daitya boys how and when he got that knowledge, he narrated how when his father went out to Mandara for penance, his mother was taken captive by Indra who set her at liberty on the advice of Nārada, who kept her in custody until his father's return...

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa VI. 18. 12, 13. VII. 1. 41; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 5. 33; 8. 6; Matsya-purāṇa 6. 9; Vāyu-purāṇa 67. 70; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 15. 142.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa I. 3. 11; 12. 25; IV. 21. 29; V. 18. 7; VI. 18. 10, 16; VII. 1. 41-43; X. 39. 54; 63. 47-9; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 15. 143-52.
  • 3) Bhāgavata-purāṇa VII. 4. 30-43.
  • 4) Ib. VII. 5. 1-3.
  • 5) Ib. IV. 18. 16.
  • 6) Ib. VI. 3. 20.

1b) A Kādraveya Nāga.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 36; Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 73.

2) Prāhlāda (प्राह्लाद).—(also Prahlāda) defeated by Indra in war;1 was regarded as the Indra of the Asuras;2 came after Hiraṇyakaśipu and Bali.3

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 97. 79.
  • 2) Ib. 97. 90.
  • 3) Ib. 98. 41, 81.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Prahlada a saintly boy from the Puranas known for his piety and bhakti to Vishnu, despite the attempts of his father, Hiranyakashipu, to turn change him. He is considered to be a mahājana, or great devotee, by followers of Vaishnava traditions and is of special importance to devotees of the avatār Narasimha (the Man-Lion). A treatise is accredited to him in the Bhagavata Purana in which Prahlada describes the process of loving worship to his lord, Vishnu.

Prahlada was a great devotee of lord vishnu. According to hindu mythology, Narada taught prahlada NarayanaMantras, when prahada was in his mother's stomach. From then he is a great devotee to Lord Vishnu.

Prahlada was born to Hiranyakashipu and Kayadu, an evil king who had been granted a boon that he could not be killed by man or animal, day or night, inside or outside. Despite several warnings from his father Hiranyakashipu, Prahlada continues to worship Vishnu instead of him. His father then decided to commit filicide and poison him, but he survived. Then he trampled the boy with elephants, but he lived. Then he put him in a room with venomous snakes, and they made a bed for him with their bodies.

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

The history of Prahlada Maharaja, the great devotee of Nrsimhadeva, is narrated in the Seventh Canto of Srimad-Bhagavatam. Prahlada Maharaja, a small child of only five years, became the object of envy for his great father, Hiranyakasipu, only because of his becoming a pure devotee of the Lord. The demon father employed all his weapons to kill the devotee son, Prahlada, but by the grace of the Lord he was saved from all sorts of dangerous actions by his father. He was thrown in a fire, in boiling oil, from the top of a hill, underneath the legs of an elephant, and he was administered poison. At last the father himself took up a chopper to kill his son, and thus Nrsimhadeva appeared and killed the heinous father in the presence of the son. Thus no one can kill the devotee of the Lord.

(Source): The Hare Krsnas: Prahlada Maharaja

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Prahlāda (प्रह्लाद) is the name of the seventh Prativāsudeva according to both Śvetāmbara and Digambara sources. Jain legends describe nine such Prativāsudevas (anti-heroes) usually appearing as powerful but evil antagonists instigating Vāsudeva by subjugating large portions of Bharata-land. As such, they are closely related with the twin brothers known as the Vāsudevas (“violent heroes”) and the Baladevas (“gentle heroes”).

The Prativāsudevas (such as Prahlāda) fight against the twin-heroes with their cakra-weapon but at the final moment are killed by the Vāsudevas. Their stories are narrated in the Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacarita (“the lives of the sixty-three illustrious persons”), a twelfth-century Śvetāmbara work by Hemacandra.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Jainism
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Prahlāda (प्रह्लाद).—

1) Great joy, pleasure, delight, happiness.

2) Sound.

3) A species of rice.

4) Name of a son of the demon Hiraṇya-Kaśipu. [According to the Padma Purāṇa, he was a Brāhmaṇa in his previous existence, and when born as son of Hiraṇya-Kaśipu, he still retained his ardent devotion to Viṣṇu. His father, of course, did not like that his own son should be such a devout worshipper of his mortal enemies, the gods, and with the object of getting rid of him, he subjected him to a variety of cruelties; but Prahlāda, by the favour of Viṣṇu, was quite unscathed, and began to preach with even greater earnestness than before the doctrine that Viṣṇu filled all space and was omni-present, omni-scient, omni-potent. HiraṇyaKaśipu in a fit of exasperation asked him "If Viṣṇu is omni-present how do I not see him in the pillar of this hall?" Whereupon Prahlāda struck the pillar with his fist (according to another account, HiraṇyaKaśipu himself angrily kicked the pillar to convince his son of the absurdity of his faith), when Viṣṇu came out half-man and half-lion, and tore HiraṇyaKaśipu to pieces. Prahlāda succeeded his father, and reigned wisely and righteously.]

Derivable forms: prahlādaḥ (प्रह्लादः).

See also (synonyms): prahrāda.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Relevant definitions

Search found 71 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Vamana
Vāmana (वामन, “dwarf”) refers to one of the six types of Saṃsthāna (structu...
Bali
1) Bali (बलि).—(MAHĀBALI) I. An emperor of the Asuras. He was the son of Virocana and the grand...
Virocana
1) Virocana (विरोचन).—General information. An asura. He was the son of Prahlāda and the father ...
Asura
Asura (असुर) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.35, I.65, I.61.9) and represents...
Nrisimha
Nṛsiṃha (नृसिंह) or Narasiṃha refers to one of the various Vibhava manifestations according to ...
Shukra
1) Śukra (शुक्र).—(ŚUKRĀCĀRYA) I. Preceptor of the Asuras. Birth. Views differ as to whether Śu...
Kesini
1) Keśinī (केशिनी).—A celestial woman. In Mahābhārata, Ādi Parva Chapter 65 it is stated that t...
Shiva
Śiva (शिव) is the name of a deity who was imparted with the knowledge of the Makuṭāgama by Sadā...
Raji
Rāji (राजि) or Rājī (राजी).—f. [rāj-in vā ṅīp Uṇ.4.136]1) A streak, line, row, range; सर्वं पण्...
Hiranyakashipu
1) Hiraṇyakaśipu (हिरण्यकशिपु).—(See Hiraṇya).2) Hiraṇyakaśipu (हिरण्यकशिपु).—A dānava. He once...
Nivatakavaca
Nivātakavaca (निवातकवच).—A sect of Daityas. Birth. Daityas were the off-springs of Kaśyapaprajā...
Ajagara
Ājagara (आजगर).—An ascetic. Śānti Parva of Mahābhārata in its 179th Chapter states that Prahlād...
Andhaka
Andhaka (अन्धक) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.221, II.48.42, III.48.18, VI.20....
Harivarsha
Harivarṣa (हरिवर्ष) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.25.7) and represents one of...
Bana
Bāṇa (बाण) is the name of an Asura who lost his daughter Uṣā to Aniruddha, according to the Kat...

Relevant text