Trishira, Triśirā, Triśira, Triśīra: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Trishira means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Triśirā and Triśira and Triśīra can be transliterated into English as Trisira or Trishira, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Trishira in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Triśira (त्रिशिर).—A son of Tvaṣṭa and Yaśodharā;1 his mother was a sister of Virocana;2 a Rākṣasa killed by Rāma.3 His city was in the third Talam.4

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 1. 86; Vāyu-purāṇa 65. 85.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 84. 19.
  • 3) Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 10. 9; Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 167.
  • 4) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 20. 26; Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 26.

1b) A son of Khaśa and a Rākṣasa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 135.

1c) A son of Viśravas and Vākā.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 8. 56; Vāyu-purāṇa 70. 50.

1d) A son of Prahrādi and Tvaṣṭā ?.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 59. 19-20.
Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Triśirā (त्रिशिरा) refers to one of the sons of Vākā and Viśravas, according to one account of Vaṃśa (‘genealogical description’) of the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, [...] Viśravas was born to [Ilavilā and Pulastya]. Viśravas had four wives—Puṣpotkaṭā, Vākā, Kaikasī and Devavarṇinī. From Vāka were born three fearful demons—Triśirā, Dūṣaṇa and Vidyujjihva.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Triśirā (त्रिशिरा) is another name (synonym) for Pāṭhā, which is a Sanskrit name for the plant Cissampelos pareira (velvetleaf). This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 6.119-121), which is an Ayurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (shaktism)

Triśīra (त्रिशीर) or Triśīratantra refers to one of the thirty-three Dakṣiṇatantras, belonging to the Śāktāgama (or Śāktatantra) division of the Āgama tradition. The Śāktāgamas represent the wisdom imparted by Devī to Īśvara and convey the idea that the worship of Śakti is the means to attain liberation. According to the Pratiṣṭhālakṣaṇasamuccaya of Vairocana, the Śāktatantras are divided into to four parts, the Triśīra-tantra belonging to the Dakṣiṇa class.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Trishira (त्रिसिर): Trishira that is, one having three heads, was an asura mentioned in the Ramayana. He was one of the seven sons of Ravana, and his other brothers were Indrajit, Prahasta, Atikaya, Akshayakumara, Devantaka and Narantaka.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Triśira (त्रिशिर) refers to a group of deities summoned by the Yamāntaka-mantra and mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Triśira).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Triśira (त्रिशिर).—I. adj. having three points, Mahābhārata 13, 7379. Ii. m. the name of a Rākṣasa, [Bhāgavata-Purāṇa, (ed. Burnouf.)] 9, 10, 9.

Triśira is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms tri and śira (शिर).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Triśira (त्रिशिर):—[=tri-śira] [from tri] mfn. (for ras) three-pointed, [Mahābhārata xiii, 7379] ([varia lectio] catur-aśva)

2) [v.s. ...] m. See ras

3) Triśirā (त्रिशिरा):—[=tri-śirā] [from tri-śira > tri] f. Clypea hernandifolia, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Triśira (त्रिशिर):—(= triśiras)

1) adj. dreispitzig: rathastricakrastrivṛcchirāstriśiraśca (neben trivṛcchiras!) trinābhiḥ [Mahābhārata 13, 7379.] —

2) m. Nomen proprium eines Rākṣasa [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 9, 10, 9.] girimāhātmya aus dem [SKANDA-Pāṇini’s acht Bücher] [MACK. Coll. 1, 72.] —

3) f. ā die Wurzel von Bignonia suaveolens [NIGH. PR.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Triśira (त्रिशिर):——

1) Adj. als Beiw. eines Wagens. v.l. caturaśva. —

2) m. Nomen proprium eines Rakṣas' = triśiras. —

3) *f. ā Clypea hernandifolia [Rājan 6,122.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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