Kripa, aka: Kṛpa, Kṛpā; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kripa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Kṛpa and Kṛpā can be transliterated into English as Krpa or Kripa, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Kṛpa (कृप):—The male child born of the two children born from the semen of Śaradvān that fell unto a patch of grass upon him seeing Urvaśī. The female counterpart is called Kṛpī. (see Bhāgavata Purāṇa 9.21.36)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhagavata Purana

1) Kṛpa (कृप).—A King in ancient India. He never ate flesh. (Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 115, Verse 64). (See full article at Story of Kṛpa from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

2) Kṛpa (कृप).—(KṚPĀCĀRYA).

2) . Genealogy. Descended from Viṣṇu thus: Brahmā-Atri—Candra—Budha—Purūravas—Āyus—Nahuṣa—Yayāti—Puru—Janamejaya—Prācinvān—Pravīra—Namasyu—Vītabhaya—Śuṇḍu—Bahuvidha—Saṃyāti—Rahovādī—Raudrāśva—Matināra—Santurodha—Duṣyanta—Bharata—Suhotā—Gala—Garda—Suketu—Bṛhatkṣetra—Hasti—Ajamīḍha—Nīla—Śānti—Suśānti—Puruja—Arka—Bhavyāśva—Pāñcāla—Mudgala. A daughter called Ahalyā was born to Mudgala. Maharṣi Gautama married her. To Gautama was born Śatānanda, to him Satyadhṛti, to him Śaradvān and to Śaradvān was born Kṛpācārya. The Purāṇas refer to the generation preceding Gautama only in the maternal line. It is said in verse 2, Chapter 130 of the Ādi Parva, that Śaradvān was the son of Gautama. According to Agni Purāṇa, Bhāgavata etc. Śaradvān, father of Kṛpa was the son of the great-grand son of Gautama and grandson of Śatānanda. (Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 278).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Kṛpa (कृप).—(Kṛpaśāradvata) the son of Satyadhṛti (Śaradvat, Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa), found in a forest by Śantanu with the twin Kṛpī.1 Met by Kṛtavarman, Rāma and Kṛṣṇa;2 invited for the rājasūya of Yudhiṣṭhira.3 Joined Duryodhana's camp and survived the Kurukṣetra war.4 Went to Syamantapāñcaka for solar eclipse.5 Supplied arms to Śatānīka.6

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 21. 36; X. 82. 24; Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 204; 100. 11; 106. 34; Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 19. 68.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 52. [56 (V) 4, 12]; 57. 2.
  • 3) Ib. X. 74. 10.
  • 4) Ib. X. 78. [95 (V) 16]; 80. [2].
  • 5) Ib. 82. 24.
  • 6) Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 21. 4.

1b) A son of Śiṣṭa and Succāyā.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 4. 39.

1c) A sage of the eighth epoch of Manu.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 2. 17.

2) Kṛpā (कृपा).—A river from the Śuktimat (Śuktimanta, Matsya-purāṇa).*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 38; Matsya-purāṇa 114. 32.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of kripa or krpa in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Hinduism)

Kripa was born from the vitality of Sardhwan, a son of Gautama. He also had a twin sister named Kripi, who married Drona. Both Kripa and his sister were found by Shantanu in the forest and were brought up in his palace. Kripa became very learned in the scriptures and was also a skilled warrior. Once he came of age, he became the preceptor of the Kurus.

Impelled by his affection for his nephew Ashwatthama, he fought the great Kurukshetra war on the side of the Kauravas. He was one of the few great warriors on the Kaurava side to survive the war, but he forever brought shame on his name, by aiding in his nephew Ashwatthama's murders at the end of the war.

Source: Apam Napat: Indian Mythology

Kripa (कृपा): The concept of Divine Grace in Hinduism, especially in Bhakti Yoga.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

kṛpā (कृपा).—f (S) Tenderness, compassionateness, mercifulness. 2 Favorableness towards; kindlydisposedness. 3 Kindness or favor conferred. See under dayā words with which this word is compounded. 4 In theology. Divine favor, grace. 5 Compounds such as kṛpāmṛta, kṛpārasa, kṛpāvṛṣṭi are ad libitum.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

kṛpā (कृपा).—f Favourableness towards; kind- ness; tenderness.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of kripa or krpa in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Kṛpa (कृप).—The maternal uncle of अश्वत्थामन् (aśvatthāman). [He was born of the sage Śaradvat by a nymph called Jānapadī, but along with his sister Kṛpī, also born from the nymph, he was brought up by Śantanu. He was proficient in the science of archery. In the great war he sided with the Kauravas, and after all had been slain he was given an asylum by the Pāṇḍavas. He is one of the seven Chirajīvins.] कृपश्च समितिञ्जयः (kṛpaśca samitiñjayaḥ) Bg.1.8.

Derivable forms: kṛpaḥ (कृपः).

--- OR ---

Kṛpā (कृपा).—[krap-bhidā °aṅ saṃpra.] Pity, tenderness, compassion; कृपया परयाविष्टः (kṛpayā parayāviṣṭaḥ) Bg.1.28; चक्रवाकयोः पुरो वियुक्ते मिथुने कृपावती (cakravākayoḥ puro viyukte mithune kṛpāvatī) Ku.5.26; Śānti.4.19; सकृपम् (sakṛpam) kindly.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of kripa or krpa in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 57 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kripanvita
Kṛpānvita (कृपान्वित).—a. merciful. Kṛpānvita is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms kṛ...
Kripasindhu
Kṛpāsindhu (कृपासिन्धु).—extremely compassionate. Derivable forms: kṛpāsindhuḥ (कृपासिन्धुः).Kṛ...
Kripakara
Kṛpākara (कृपाकर).—extremely compassionate. Derivable forms: kṛpākaraḥ (कृपाकरः).Kṛpākara is a ...
Kripadrishti
Kṛpādṛṣṭi (कृपादृष्टि).—f. a look with favour, a kind of look.Derivable forms: kṛpādṛṣṭiḥ (कृपा...
Kripasagara
Kṛpāsāgara (कृपासागर).—extremely compassionate. Derivable forms: kṛpāsāgaraḥ (कृपासागरः).Kṛpāsā...
Kripasiddha
Kṛpāsiddha (कृपासिद्ध).—One who as attained perfection by the mercy of superior author...
Kripasiddhi
Kṛpāsiddhi (कृपासिद्धि).—Perfection attained simply by the blessings of the Lord or a ...
Gautama
Gautama (गौतम) or Gautamasaṃhitā is the name of a Vaiṣṇava Āgama scripture, classified as a tām...
Kripi
Kṛpī (कृपी).—(See Para 2 under Kṛpa II). Later history. Kṛpī was brought up in the palace of K...
Shila
Śila (शिल).—n. (-laṃ) Gleaning ears of corn. f. (-lā) 1. A stone, a rock. 2. Arsenic. 3. A flat...
Kamala
Kamala (कमल).—n. (-laṃ) 1. A lotus, (Nelumbium speciosum or Nymphæa nelumbo.) 2. Water. 3. Copp...
Shali
Śāli (शालि) refers to “rice” and represents one of the seven village-corns that are fit for foo...
Drona
Droṇa.—(IE 8-6; Chamba), a grain measure; often regarded as equal to four āḍhakas; between one ...
Satyadhriti
1) Satyadhṛti (सत्यधृति).—A son of Śatānanda. It is mentioned in Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 278, that...
Kripana
Kṛpaṇa.—(CII 1), poor. Note: kṛpaṇa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can ...

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