Gomukha, aka: Go-mukha; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Gomukha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

Gomukha (गोमुख): a Musical Instrument.—It is said to be “a wind instrument” of shell species, a kind of conch somewhat resembling the mouth of the cow, whence it derives its name. The Vedas do not know it though it appears that the flute (another kind of wind instrument) has a Vedic antiquity (see Veṇu). The Jātakas are silent about it and Kauṭilya also does not mention it. But there are many references to it in the epics. About the Gomukhas in the Vāyu-purāṇa we can say the same as in the case of Bherī.

(Source): Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

1a) Gomukha (गोमुख).—City of, in Sutalam.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 20. 22.

1b) Second Tala; Asura in.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 21.

1c) A son of Śambhu.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 67. 87.

1d) A pupil of Vedamitra—Śākalya.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 4. 22.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purāṇa book cover
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The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Gomukha (गोमुख) refers to a musical instrument, first mentioned in Nāṭyaśāstra 4.253, after Śiva danced using Recakas and Aṅgahāras, and Pārvatī performed a ‘gentle dance’.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Nāṭyaśāstra book cover
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Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Vāstuśāstra (architecture)

Gomukha (गोमुख) is another name for Govaktra, which refers to one of the four classes of praṇālas (“water-drains”) constructed into the sanctum for the purpose of draining oblation water and rainwater. It is a Sanskrit technical term used throughout Vāstuśāstra literature. The govaktra-praṇāla is connected with the Brāmaṇa caste.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra
Vāstuśāstra book cover
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Vāstuśāstra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vastu-shastra) refers to the knowledge of architecture. It is a branch of ancient Indian science dealing with topics such architecture, construction, sculpture and their relation with the cosmic universe.

Kathā (narrative stories)

Gomukha (गोमुख) is the son of Ityaka (a minister of Udayana), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 23. Accordingly, when prince Naravāhanadatta (son of Udayana) grew up, all the king’s ministers brought there sons for the sake of his companion. Accordingly, “And that Prince Naravāhanadatta was always surrounded by those six ministers’ sons (eg., Gomukha), devoted to him alone, who commanded respect even in their boyhood, as if with the six political measures that are the cause of great prosperity”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Gomukha, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Kathā book cover
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Kathās (कथा) are special kind of Sanskrit literature: they are a kind of a mix between Itihāsa (historical legends) and Mahākāvya (epic poetry). Some Kathās reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of the historical deeds of the Gods, sages and heroes.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

gōmukha (गोमुख).—n (S) A cow's mouth of wood, metal, or stone. Used as, in English, the word lion's mouth. 2 A particular musical instrument.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

gōmukha (गोमुख).—n A cow's mouth of wood, metal, &c.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Relevant definitions

Search found 1355 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Mukha
Mukha (मुख, “mouth”) refers to that part of the human body from which the Buddha emitted numero...
Go
gō (गो).—A cow. ind See agō.
Adhomukha
adhōmukha (अधोमुख) [-vadana, -वदन].—a With the face downwards, dejected, downcast.
Kartarimukha
Kartarīmukha (कर्तरीमुख) refers to “scissors-like” and represents one of the thirty-two mudrās ...
Shrimukha
śrīmukha (श्रीमुख).—n Illustrious countenance. śrīmukhānta dēṇēṃ To slap the face.
Gomukhasana
Gomukhāsana (गोमुखासन) is one of the thirty-two āsanas (postures) taught in the second chapter ...
Simhamukha
Siṃhamukha (सिंहमुख) is the name of a ‘river mouth’ (mukha) into which the lake Anavatapta flow...
Talamukha
Talamukha (तलमुख).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with dance-hands (nṛttahasta);&mda...
Ashvamukha
Aśvamukha (अश्वमुख) is the name of a ‘river mouth’ (mukha) into which the lake Anavatapta flows...
Mukharaga
mukharāga (मुखराग).—m (S) The liveliness, lightness, or lustre of the countenance; clearness or...
Gorasa
Gorasa (गोरस) refers to one of the four classifications of food (āhāra), according to rasa (tas...
Katakamukha
Kaṭakāmukha (कटकामुख, “elephant-apple”).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with a singl...
Nandimukha
nāndīmukha (नांदीमुख).—n nāndīśrāddha n Oblations to the manes offered on festal occasions.
Sakata-mukha
Sakaṭa-mukha the front or opening of the waggon, used as adj. “facing the waggon or the cart...
Gotirtha
Gotīrtha (गोतीर्थ) is the name of a Tīrtha (sacred bathing place) that is associated with the G...

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