Duracara, Durācāra, Durācara, Dur-acara: 15 definitions

Introduction:

Duracara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Durachara.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Durācāra (दुराचार, “ill-doing”) refers to a “tyrant” and is a term to be used by women who is angered addressing their beloved, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 24. Accordingly, “he who restrains indiscreetly a woman’s movement or beats her or uses harsh words to her, is called a ‘tyrant’ (durācāra)”.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Duracara in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Durācāra (दुराचार) refers to “men of evil conduct”, and is used by the evil-minded Dakṣa to describe the Brahmins that walked out on his sacrifice, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.27. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] when the sage Dadhīci and others staged a walkout, the evil-minded Dakṣa, inimical to Śiva, said mocking at them.:—‘[...] They are slow-witted and senseless. They are rogues indulging in false deliberations and discussions. They are out of the Vedic circle. These men of evil conduct (durācāra) shall be eschewed from sacrificial rites’”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Durācāra (दुराचार) refers to one of the eight Guardians (kṣetrapāla-aṣṭaka) associated with Tisrapīṭha (located in the ‘end of sound’—nādānta), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—[...] The eight Guardians (kṣetrapālāṣṭaka): Śrīdhara, Bhāsura, Raudra, Durācāra, Śāntika, Kṛttika, Kālavṛṣṭi, Vasiṣṭha

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Durācāra (दुराचार) refers to “those whose behavior is bad” according to Flood (2003, p. 215).—Accordingly, “Although the [Netra Tantra] has connections with royalty, it also bears witness to popular possession and exorcism rites which were probably pervasive among lower social levels. Indeed, one of the main tasks of the orthopraxy of Brāhmaṇ was to prevent possession. These ‘demons’ (bhūta) and powerful female deities or ‘mothers’ (mātṛ) enter through the ‘hole’ (chidra) of the shad of impure men and women whose behavior is bad (durācāra) and who have neglected their ritual obligations, so causing the evil eye (dṛṣṭipāta) to fall upon them”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Durācara (दुराचर).—a.

1) hard to be performed.

2) incurable (as a disease).

Durācara is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dur and ācara (आचर).

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Durācāra (दुराचार).—a.

1) ill-conducted, badly behaved.

2) following bad practices, wicked, depraved; अपि चेत्सुदुराचारो भजते मामनन्यभाक् (api cetsudurācāro bhajate māmananyabhāk) Bhagavadgītā (Bombay) 9.3.

-raḥ bad practice, ill-conduct, wikedness.

Durācāra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dur and ācāra (आचार).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durācāra (दुराचार).—mfn.

(-raḥ-rā-raṃ) 1. Wicked, depraved, following evil practices. 2. Disregarding or deviating from established practices. m.

(-raḥ) Wickedness. E. dur bad, ācāra observance.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durācara (दुराचर).—i. e. dus-ā-car + a, adj., f. . 1. Hard to be practised, Mahābhārata 12, 656. 2. Difficult to be cured, [Suśruta] 2, 361, 9.

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Durācāra (दुराचार).—I. m. bad conduct, ib. 12, 4539. Ii. adj., f. , following bad customs, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 157.

Durācāra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms dus and ācāra (आचार).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durācara (दुराचर).—[feminine] ī difficult to be handed or treated.

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Durācāra (दुराचार).—1. [masculine] bad conduct, wickedness.

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Durācāra (दुराचार).—2. [adjective] ill-behaved, depraved, wicked.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Durācara (दुराचर):—[=dur-ācara] [from dur] mfn. d° to be practised or performed, [Mahābhārata xii, 656]

2) [v.s. ...] d° to be treated or cured, incurable, [Suśruta]

3) Durācāra (दुराचार):—[=dur-ācāra] [from dur] m. bad behaviour, ill conduct, [Mahābhārata]

4) [v.s. ...] mfn. ill-conducted, wicked, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata etc.]

5) Dūracara (दूरचर):—[=dūra-cara] [from dūra] mfn. walking or being far, [Rāmāyaṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] keeping away from ([ablative]), [Jātakamālā]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Durācāra (दुराचार):—[durā+cāra] (raḥ-rā-raṃ) a. Wicked, base in conduct. m. Wickedness.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Durācāra (दुराचार) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Durāyāra, Dūracara.

[Sanskrit to German]

Duracara in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Dūracara (दूरचर) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Dūracara.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Durācāra (ದುರಾಚಾರ):—

1) [noun] bad conduct; an impolite, unmannerly or wicked behaviour.

2) [noun] a man having such qualities.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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