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Devīkoṭa, aka: Devikota; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Devīkoṭa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

The Sanskrit term Devīkoṭa can be transliterated into English as Devikota, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

Devikoṭa (देविकोट).—Sacred to Lalitā-pīṭham.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 96.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Śaivism (Śaiva philosophy)

Devīkoṭa (देवीकोट) is the sacred region (pīṭha) associated with Olinātha, who was one of the twelve princes born to Kuṃkumā, consort to Mīnanātha, who is the incarnation of Siddhanātha in the fourth yuga, belonging to the Pūrvāmnāya (‘eastern doctrine’) tradition of Kula Śaivism, according to the Ciñcinīmatasārasamuccaya. Siddhanātha incarnates as a Kaula master in each of the four yugas. Olinātha was one of the six princes having the authority to teach.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

1) Devīkoṭa (देवीकोट):—The name for a ‘sacred site’ associated with the group of eight deities (mātṛ) born from Khecarī, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra. Khecarī is the first of the Eight Mahāmātṛs, residing within the Mātṛcakra (third of the five cakras) and represents the element ether or space.

2) Devīkoṭa (देवीकोट):—Another name for Śrīkoṭa, one of the twenty-four pītha (‘sacred sites’) of the Sūryamaṇḍala according to the kubjikāmata-tantra.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

about this context:

Śaiva (शैव, shaiva) or Śaivism (shaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Śiva as the supreme being. Closeley related to Śāktism, Śaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Relevant definitions

Search found 4 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Karṇamoṭī
Karṇamoṭī (कर्णमोटी) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created ...
Sūryamaṇḍala
Sūryamaṇḍala (सूर्यमण्डल).—Seen after 1000 years in the 27th Kalpa; all yogas and mantras...
Olinātha
Olinātha (ओलिनाथ) is one of the twelve princes born to Kuṃkumā, consort to Mīnanātha, who is...
Śrīkoṭa
Śrīkoṭa (श्रीकोट):—Sanskrit name for one of the twenty-four sacred sites of the Sūryam...

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