Purnagiri, Pūrṇagiri, Purna-giri: 10 definitions

Introduction:

Purnagiri means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Purnagiri in Shaivism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि):—The name of one of the pīthas of the Mātṛcakra, according to the Kubjikāmatatantra. The presiding goddess is Caṇḍākṣī (one of the four female attendant deities of Mitra, the central deity).

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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Purnagiri in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि).—The Pīṭha in the face of the Veda personified.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 104. 79.
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Purnagiri in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: The Kubjikāmatatantra: Kulālikāmnāya Version

Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि) refers to one of the Mahāpīṭhas where Devī becomes incarnate, according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra.—After her stay on the Kaumāraparvata, Devī visits several localities e.g., Mount Trikūṭa, Mount Kiṣkindha etc., untill she reaches the Western Himagahvara. This locality and the three following—Karāla, Sahya Mahāvana, Ucchuṣmā Nadī—are identified with the four Mahāpīṭhas: Oḍḍiyāna, Jālandhara, Pūrṇagiri and Kāmarūpa. In these four places, Devī becomes incarnate as a protective goddess and future mother of many sons and daughters; a number of servants also appears at each of the four localities. During her stay in the fourth Mahāpīṭha Devī explains the fifth which is called Mātaṅga. In contradistinction to the other Pīṭhas it has no fixed location on earth, but seems to be located above Kāmarūpa. As such it is the place of origin of the entire world. [...] After her visit to the fourth Mahāpīṭha, the goddess proceeds to various other places; [...]

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि) is the name of a mountain, according to the Śrīmatottara-tantra, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “Covered for the full extent of (its) area with many sacred bathing sites on rivers, great and small. It is illumined by many jewels and apparitions (vibhrama) of many forms and full, beautiful (sacrificial) jars that (shine) like divine gold. There that (sacred seat) is completely full with the rays of the (goddess’s) divine body (filled in this way) by (her) mere arrival there and so it is called Pūrṇagiri (the Full Mountain)”

2) Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि) is situated on the northern peak of Kailāśa, according to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā, an expansion of the Kubjikāmatatantra: the earliest popular and most authoritative Tantra of the Kubjikā cult.—Accordingly, “(Pūrṇagiri) is on the northern peak of Kailāśa and is full of countless flames. [...] That divine city of the supreme Lord is made of pillars of adamantine. It is surrounded by temple arches and palaces of the Fire of Time. It is filled with many forms and adorned with knowledge and (divine) qualities. Possessing many wonders, it is life itself in the triple universe. (All) this is filled by it and so it is called ‘Full’ (pūrṇa i.e. Pūrṇagiri). (The Fire of Time) has seven tongues (of flame; his) form is Time and has six faces. Possessing the Full Moon, (he) is beautiful. (He is) the Great Vitality, holds a spear and brings about creation and destruction”.

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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: archive.org: The Indian Buddhist Iconography

Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि) refers to one of the four pīṭhas (sacred spots) according to the Sādhanamālā.—It is difficult to say from what exact locality Tantrism took its origin. In the Sādhanamālā are mentioned the four Pīṭhas or sacred spots of the Vajrayānists, namely, Kāmākhyā, Sirihaṭṭa, Pūrṇagiri and Uḍḍiyāna. [...] Pūrṇagiri which signifies a hill is not identified yet with certainty.

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)

Pañcāla (पञ्चाल) is substituted for Pullīramalaya in the Vajraḍākavivṛti commentary of the 9th-centruy Vajraḍākatantra. Pullīramalaya is one of the four Upapīthas (‘sacred spot’) present within the Cittacakra (‘circle of mid’) which is associated with the Ḍākinī named Khecarī (‘a woman going in the sky’).

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि) is the name of a Pīṭha (sacred seat) [i.e., oṃ pūrṇagiripīṭhāya svāhā], according to the Vāruṇī Pūjā [i.e., Varuni Worship] ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram (history)

Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि) is the name of a sacred site.—The inhabitants of the Nainital district of the Himalayas identify a sacred mountain in that region as Pūrṇagiri. This name, however, is relatively recent. The older form, reported in the Almora Gazetteer of 1911, is Puniagiri, which is derivable from the Sanskrit Puṇyagiri (‘Mountain of Merit’), rather than Pūrṇagiri. Another candidate is found in Orissa. There, learned Oḍiyas, on the basis of their local traditions, identify it with the town of Puṣpagiri. This site greatly impressed the Chinese pilgrim Hsuan tsang, who visited Orissa in the 7th century. From his description it appears that Puṣpagiri was an important Buddhist centre at that time. Unfortunately, the exact location of Puṣpagiri remains uncertain. Another possibility is a mountain by this name in central India, which to my mind appears to be the most likely identification.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Purnagiri in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Pūrṇagiri (पूर्णगिरि):—[=pūrṇa-giri] [from pūrṇa > pūra] m. Name of a place, [Catalogue(s)]

[Sanskrit to German]

Purnagiri in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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