Brahmarandhra, aka: Brahman-randhra; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Brahmarandhra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Brahmarandhra in Rasashastra glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

Brahmarandhra (ब्रह्मरन्ध्र) is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fourth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 2, dealing with jvara: fever). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). Pārvatīśaṅkara is an ayurveda treatment and should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (eg., brahmarandhra-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

Discover the meaning of brahmarandhra in the context of Rasashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Brahmarandhra in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

Brahmarandhra (ब्रह्मरन्ध्र) is explained in terms of kuṇḍalinīyoga by Lakṣmaṇadeśika in his 11th-century Śaradātilaka.—The body is described, starting from the “bulb” (kanda), the place in which the subtle channels (nāḍī) originate, located between anus and penis (28–9). The three principal channels are iḍā (left), piṅgalā (right) and suṣumṇā (in the centre of the spine and the head). Inside the suṣumṇā is citrā, a channel connecting to the place on the top of the skull called the brahmarandhra (30–4).

Note: The brahmarandhra, the “opening of brahman”, is a small opening on the top of the skull near the fontanel; its name is based on a belief expressed in the older Upaniṣads that it is a place from which the ātman can leave the body to unite with the .

Source: academia.edu: The Śāradātilakatantra on Yoga
Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of brahmarandhra in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Brahmarandhra in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

Brahmarandhra (ब्रह्मरन्ध्र, “cranial apperture”) refers to one of the sixteen types of “locus” or “support” (ādhāra) according to the Netratantra. These ādhāras are called so because they “support” or “localise” the self and are commonly identified as places where breath may be retained. They are taught in two different setups: according to the tantraprakriyā and according to the kulaprakriyā. Brahmarandhra belongs to the latter system.

Source: academia.edu: The Śaiva Yogas and Their Relation to Other Systems of Yoga
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of brahmarandhra in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Brahmarandhra in Marathi glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

brahmarandhra (ब्रह्मरंध्र).—n (S) The aperture, supposed to be at the crown of the head, through which the soul takes its flight on death.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of brahmarandhra in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Brahmarandhra in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [B] · next »

Brahmarandhra (ब्रह्मरन्ध्र).—an aperture in the crown of the head through which the soul is said to escape on its leaving the body; आरोप्य ब्रह्मरन्ध्रेण ब्रह्म नीत्वोत्सृजेत्तनुम् (āropya brahmarandhreṇa brahma nītvotsṛjettanum) Bhāg.11.15.24.

Derivable forms: brahmarandhram (ब्रह्मरन्ध्रम्).

Brahmarandhra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms brahman and randhra (रन्ध्र).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of brahmarandhra in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 1357 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Brahman
Brahman (ब्रह्मन्).—n. [bṛṃh-manin nakārasyākāre ṛto ratvam; cf. Uṇ.4.145.]1) The Supreme Being...
Brahmacarya
Brahmacarya (ब्रह्मचर्य), or “stage of studentship” refers to the first of the four Āśramas (“s...
Brahmaloka
Brahmaloka (ब्रह्मलोक).—the world of Brahman. Derivable forms: brahmalokaḥ (ब्रह्मलोकः).Brahmal...
Brahmavihara
Brahmavihāra (ब्रह्मविहार).—a pious conduct, perfect state; Buddh. Derivable forms: brahmavihār...
Brahmayajna
Brahmayajña (ब्रह्मयज्ञ).—A special sacrifice to be performed by a Brāhmin only. The rules and ...
Brahmastra
Brahmāstra (ब्रह्मास्त्र) is the name of a weapon (astra), capable of repelling the Brahmāstra,...
Brahmanda
Brahmāṇḍa (ब्रह्माण्ड).—The word Brahmāṇḍa means the aṇḍa of Brahmā (aṇḍa-egg), the Supreme Bei...
Brahmapurana
Brahmapurāṇa (ब्रह्मपुराण).—(brāhmapurāṇa) This is a great book of twenty-five thousand verses...
Brahmarakshasa
Brahmarākṣasa (ब्रह्मराक्षस).—a kind of ghost, the ghost of a Brāhmaṇa, who during his life tim...
Brahmasthana
Brahmasthāna (ब्रह्मस्थान).—A holy place. It is mentioned in Mahābhārata, Vana Parva, Chapter 8...
Brahma-muhurta
Brāhmamuhūrta (ब्राह्ममुहूर्त).—The period of forty-eight minutes before the sunrise is called ...
Randhra
Randhra (रन्ध्र).—[Uṇ.2.28]1) A hole, an aperture, a cavity, an opening, a chasm, fissure; रन्ध...
Brahmahatya
Brahmahatyā (ब्रह्महत्या).—Killing a Brāhmaṇa is called Brahmahatyā. In ancient India killing a...
Brahmapuri
Brahmapurī (ब्रह्मपुरी).—The abode of Brahmā. Brahmapurī is on the summit of Mahāmeru, with an ...
Brahmasana
Brahmāsana (ब्रह्मासन).—a particular position for profound meditation. Derivable forms: brahmās...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: