Sentiment: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Sentiment means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Gitashastra (science of music)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (gita)

The Sentiment (in Indian classical Music) is denoted by the Sanskrit term Rasa, and they have an inherent relationship with the svaras (“musical notes”). There are nine kinds of sentiments. In the Nāṭyaśāstra some particular svaras are determined for the delineation of some specific sentiments. In the Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa, the laya i.e., the tempo of Music is also determined according to the sentiments.

context information

Gitashastra (गीतशास्त्र, gītaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science of Music (gita or samgita), which is traditionally divided in Vocal music, Instrumental music and Dance (under the jurisdiction of music). The different elements and technical terms are explained in a wide range of (often Sanskrit) literature.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (natya)

The Sentiment (in Sanskrit: Rasa) is a very important component in poetry. Drama belongs to dṛśyakāvya variety and for this reason it can be said that rasa i.e., sentiment is the soul of Drama too. The primary meaning of rasa refers to taste or to savour or to relish, but metaphorically it means the emotional experience of beauty in poetry.

The Viṣṇudharmottarapurāṇa accepts nine rasas or “sentiments in Drama”. These are—

  1. Erotic (= śṛṅgāra),
  2. Humour (= hāsya),
  3. Pathos (= karuṇa),
  4. Furious (= raudra),
  5. Heroic (= vīra),
  6. Terrible (= bhayānaka),
  7. Wonder (= adbhuta),
  8. Odious (= bībhatsa) and
  9. Quietism (= śānta).
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Kavyashastra (science of poetry)

Source: Shodhganga: Elements of Art and Architecture in the Trtiyakhanda of the Visnudharmottarapurana (kavya)

The Sentiment (Rasa) is “the soul of a kāvya or poetry”.—The Sentiment is a very important component in poetry. Through the delineation of different sentiments different way, the connoisseurs can relish the taste of a poetic piece. The primary meaning of rasa refers to taste or to savour or to relish, but metaphorically it means the emotional experience of beauty in poetry. The sentiment is that which touches our heart and fills it with a great sensation, after reading or hearing a piece of poetry or viewing a performing art. But the point to be noted here is that only suggestive type of literary piece has the capacity to reflect the sentiment or rasa, as rasa itself is always suggestive.

Kavyashastra book cover
context information

Kavyashastra (काव्यशास्त्र, kāvyaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian tradition of poetry (kavya). Canonical literature (shastra) of the includes encyclopedic manuals dealing with prosody, rhetoric and various other guidelines serving to teach the poet how to compose literature.

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