Samcarin, Sancarin, Sancari, Sañcari, Sañcārin, Saṃcārin, Sañcārī, Saṃcāri, Samcari, Samcari: 19 definitions

Introduction:

Samcarin means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, Tamil. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Sancharin.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Saṃcārin (संचारिन्, “moving together”) refers to “mixed” and is one of the four varṇas (order), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 29. These four varṇas define the production (i.e., order or scale) of notes (svara) and are used to make up the thirty-three alaṃkāras (embellishments) of a song.

Source: archive.org: Northern Indian Music Volume I

Sañcārin (सञ्चारिन्) refers to the first of four stages through which a rāga (melodic mode) develops itself.—The sañcārin / sañcārī (the caraṇa of South Indian music) begins from the higher C (Sa) and moves freely in all three octaves.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Jaiva-dharma

Sañcārin (सञ्चारिन्) or Sañcārī is another name (synonym) for Vyabhicārin, which refers to one of the four ingredients of rasa.

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Sports, Arts and Entertainment (wordly enjoyments)

[«previous next»] — Samcarin in Arts glossary
Source: archive.org: Syainika Sastra of Rudradeva with English Translation (art)

Saṃcārin (संचारिन्) refers to “flying together” (of birds), according to the Śyainika-śāstra: a Sanskrit treatise dealing with the divisions and benefits of Hunting and Hawking, written by Rājā Rudradeva (or Candradeva) in possibly the 13th century.—Accordingly, [while discussing the outlines of hawking]: “[...] When two birds fly together (dvandva-saṃcārin) and one is killed, the survivor mourns pitifully. This excites the emotion of sorrow. In the king, the lover’s emotion is discernible in two conditions, that of enjoyment when the quarry is caught, and that of separation when it escapes. [...]”.

Arts book cover
context information

This section covers the skills and profiencies of the Kalas (“performing arts”) and Shastras (“sciences”) involving ancient Indian traditions of sports, games, arts, entertainment, love-making and other means of wordly enjoyments. Traditionally these topics were dealt with in Sanskrit treatises explaing the philosophy and the justification of enjoying the pleasures of the senses.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Sañcārin.—(EI 24), cf. Śāsana-sañcārin and Ājñā-sañcārin. Note: sañcārin is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samcarin in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sañcari : (aor. of sañcarati) went about; wandered; moved.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Saṃcārin (संचारिन्).—a. (-ṇī f.)

1) Moving, moveable; संचारिणी नगरदेवतेव (saṃcāriṇī nagaradevateva) Mālatīmādhava (Bombay) 1; Kumārasambhava 3.54; संचारिणी दीपशिखेव रात्रौ (saṃcāriṇī dīpaśikheva rātrau) R.6. 67.

2) Roaming, wandering.

3) Changing, unsteady, fickle.

4) Difficult to be passed, inaccessible.

5) Evanescent, as a Bhāva; see below.

6) Influencing.

7) Hereditary, successively communicated (as a disease).

8) Contagious.

9) Impelling. -m.

1) Wind, air.

2) Incense.

3) A transient or evanescent feeling which serves to strengthen the prevailing sentiment; see व्यभिचारिन् (vyabhicārin).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sañcārin (सञ्चारिन्).—mfn. (-rī-riṇī-ri) 1. Fickle, changeable, not permanent. 2. Moving, going. 3. Difficult, inaccessible. 4. Moving, putting in motion. 5. Transmitted, hereditary, (as disease.) 6. Contagious. m. (-rī) 1. Incense. 2. A division of the Bhavas, the same as the vyabhicārin, q. v. or the reverse of the sthāyin or fixed and steady sentiments. 3. An evanescent feeling which strengthens the pervading sentiments. 4. Air, wind. E. sam before car to go, ṇini aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃcārin (संचारिन्).—i. e. sam-car, and saṃcāra, + in, I. adj., f. iṇī. 1. Moving, [Kumārasaṃbhava, (ed. Stenzler.)] 3, 54. 2. Fickle, unsteady, changeable. 3. Difficult. 4. Putting in motion. 5. Contagious. 6. Hereditary (as disease). Ii. m. Incense.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃcārin (संचारिन्).—[adjective] wandering, walking about, moving; movable, transmitted, hereditary (disease); being in, occupied with (—°); accessory, incidental. [masculine] fellow (-traveller), companion ([feminine] ṇī).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Saṃcāri (संचारि):—[from saṃ-car] for saṃ-cārin in [compound]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Saṃcārin (संचारिन्):—[=saṃ-cārin] [from saṃ-car] mfn. going together or about, going hither and thither, roaming, wandering, moving in ([locative case] or [compound]), [Kāvya literature; Rājataraṅgiṇī; Kathāsaritsāgara; Inscriptions]

2) [v.s. ...] going or passing from one to another, transmitted, infectious, contagious, hereditary (as a disease), [Yājñavalkya; Rājataraṅgiṇī]

3) [v.s. ...] ascending and descending (applied to a note or tone), [Saṃgīta-sārasaṃgraha]

4) [v.s. ...] penetrating into ([compound]), [Mahāvīra-caritra]

5) [v.s. ...] coming together, meeting, in contact with, adjacent or contiguous to ([instrumental case]), [Kādambarī]

6) [v.s. ...] taken or carried together with one (as an umbrella etc.), [Rājataraṅgiṇī]

7) [v.s. ...] carrying with one ([compound]), [Kāmandakīya-nītisāra]

8) [v.s. ...] being in ([compound]), [Suśruta; Mṛcchakaṭikā]

9) [v.s. ...] engaged in, occupied with ([compound]), [Pañcarātra]

10) [v.s. ...] passing away, transitory, adventitious, unsteady, inconstant, fickle (= vy-abhicārin q.v.), [Śiśupāla-vadha; Sāhitya-darpaṇa]

11) [v.s. ...] influencing, impelling, setting in motion, [Maitrī-upaniṣad]

12) [v.s. ...] difficult, inaccessible, [Horace H. Wilson]

13) [v.s. ...] m. incense or the smoke rising from burnt incense, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] air, wind, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sañcārin (सञ्चारिन्):—[(rī-riṇī-ri) m.] Incense; fickle sentiment; wind. a. Moving, fickle; difficult; setting in motion; contagious or hereditary.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Saṃcārin (संचारिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Saṃcāri.

[Sanskrit to German]

Samcarin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Samcarin in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Saṃcārī (संचारी) [Also spelled sanchari]:—(a) communicable; mobile, moving; an auxiliary sentiment in Poetics which strengthens the main sentiment (also called-[bhāva); —roga] a communicable disease.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Saṃcāri (संचारि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Saṃcārin.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Saṃcari (ಸಂಚರಿ):—[verb] to understand, discover a secret.

--- OR ---

Saṃcāri (ಸಂಚಾರಿ):—[adjective] moving; not stationary.

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Saṃcāri (ಸಂಚಾರಿ):—

1) [noun] a woman who conveys, carries messages, errands; a runner.

2) [noun] a woman who procures men for prostitutes; a procuress.

3) [noun] a man who walks on the road, as a pedestrain.

4) [noun] a man who travels to distant places; a traveller.

5) [noun] any of thirty three minor sentiments that enrich or embelish the main sentiments in literature, music or dance.

6) [noun] (mus.) a movement in ascending and descending orders of the notes with various combinations of the musical notes for exploring the terrain of a rāga (musical mode).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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