Nagari, aka: Nagarī, Nāgarī, Nagāri, Naga-ari, Nāgāri; 11 Definition(s)

Introduction

Nagari means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Nagarī (नगरी) is a Sanskrit word referring to “the master of a city” (even though he may not be the king). The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 4.213)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Nagari in Purana glossary... « previous · [N] · next »

Nāgāri (नागारि).—One of the prominent children of Garuḍa. (Udyoga Parva, Chapter 101, Verse 9)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1) Nagarī (नगरी).—Of Devī; described.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 14. 9.

2) Nāgarī (नागरी).—A Varṇa śakti.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 58.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Nagarī (नगरी) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.28.47) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Nagarī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Nāgarī (नागरी).—(also called deva-nāgarī) The name of the script most commonly used to write Sanskrit. Note: Nāgarī is a Sanskrit technical term used in ancient Indian sciences such as Astronomy, Mathematics and Geometry.

Source: Wikibooks (hi): Sanskrit Technical Terms
Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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India history and geogprahy

Nagarī (नगरी) is mentioned as a synonym for “town” or “city” according to the Amarakośa 2.2.

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Nagari (नगरि) or Nagara is the name of an ancient locality situated in Majjhimadesa (Middle Country) of ancient India, as recorded in the Pāli Buddhist texts (detailing the geography of ancient India as it was known in to Early Buddhism).—The place is mentioned in the Barhut inscriptions. The location of the place is unknown. Is it identical with Nagarahāra mentioned in the Parāsaratantra, the Nang-go-lo-ho-lo of the Chinese, the Nagara or Dionysopolis of Ptolemy and identified with Jelalabad? If so, then it should be located in the Uttarāpatha division. But it may also be held to he identical with Nagarī or Nagara, 8 miles north of Chitorgadh State in Udaipur in Rajputana.

Source: Ancient Buddhist Texts: Geography of Early Buddhism
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

nagarī (नगरी).—f (S) A small city or town.

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nagarī (नगरी).—a Relating to Ahmednugger.

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nāgarī (नागरी).—a Relating to the nāgara Brahman--language, character of writing &c.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nagarī (नगरी).—f A small city or town.

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nāgarī (नागरी).—a Relating to the nāgara Brâhman.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nagarī (नगरी).—= नगर (nagara) q. v.

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Nagāri (नगारि).—an epithet of Indra; नगाह्वयो नाम नगारिसूनुः (nagāhvayo nāma nagārisūnuḥ) Mb.

Derivable forms: nagāriḥ (नगारिः).

Nagāri is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms naga and ari (अरि).

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Nāgāri (नागारि).—

1) an epithet of Garuḍa.

2) a peacock.

3) a lion.

Derivable forms: nāgāriḥ (नागारिः).

Nāgāri is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nāga and ari (अरि). See also (synonyms): nāgāntaka, nāgārāti.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1192 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Naga
Nāga (नाग) represents “state of desirelessness”, referring to one of the attributes of Lord Śiv...
Nagara
Nagara (नगर).—nf. (-raṃ-rī) A town, a city. E. naga a tree, or according to some, a mountain, r...
Keshari
Kesarī (केसरी).—A forest King who lived in the Mahā Meru. While Kesarī was living in the Mahāme...
Ari
Ari.—(IE 7-1-2), ‘six’; cf. ari-ṣaḍ-varga. Note: ari is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glo...
Nagavana
Nāgavana (नागवन) is the name of a forest situated in Majjhimadesa (Middle Country) of ancient I...
Nagapasha
Nāgapāśa (नागपाश).—m. (-śaḥ) 1. A weapon of Varuna the regent of water. 2. A sort of magical no...
Nagadvipa
Nāgadvīpa (नागद्वीप).—A region inside the island Sudarśana. This region has the shape of the ea...
Nagakesara
Nāgakeśara (नागकेशर).—m. (-raḥ) A small tree, commonly Nageshwar, (Mesua ferrea). E. nāga, and ...
Nagaloka
Nāgaloka (नागलोक).—The world of the Nāgas or Pātāla. Vāsuki is its chief. (Ādi Parva, Chapter 1...
Nagapura
Nāgapura is the name of an ancient locality possibly corresponding to the modern Nāgaon, as men...
Tarakari
Tārakāri (तारकारि).—m. an epithet of Kārtikeya; जेयस्तारकसूदनो युधि करक्रीडत्कुठारस्य च (jeyast...
Navanaga
navanāga (नवनाग).—m pl The nine nāga or great ser- pents of legendary history.
Mallari
Mallārī (मल्लारी).—f. (-rī) One the of Raginis or divisions of the musical mode Megha.
Kaphari
Kaphāri (कफारि).—m. (-riḥ) Ginger. E. kapha and ari foe.
Bhutari
Bhūtāri (भूतारि).—m. (-riḥ) Asafœtida. E. bhūta and ari a foe.

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