Nagapasha, Naga-pasha, Nāgapāśa: 10 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Nagapasha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Nāgapāśa can be transliterated into English as Nagapasa or Nagapasha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

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In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous (N) next»] — Nagapasha in Shaktism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Nāgapāśa (नागपाश, “the noose of serpents”) is a Sanskrit word for a weapon used in Purāṇic literature, such as the Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa (9.20.22-53), where it was in the presence of Devī Bhadrakālī, who was preparing for the war between Śankhacūḍa with the Devas.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (N) next»] — Nagapasha in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Nāgapāśa (नागपाश).—Varuṇa's wedding present to Kāmeśvara.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 15. 20.
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Dhanurveda (science of warfare)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dhanurveda

Nāgapāśa (नागपाश) refers to a weapon (a sort of magical noose used in battles to entangle an enemy). It is a Sanskrit word defined in the Dhanurveda-saṃhitā, which contains a list of no less than 117 weapons. The Dhanurveda-saṃhitā is said to have been composed by the sage Vasiṣṭha, who in turn transmitted it trough a tradition of sages, which can eventually be traced to Śiva and Brahmā.

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Dhanurveda (धनुर्वेद) refers to the “knowledge of warfare” and, as an upaveda, is associated with the Ṛgveda. It contains instructions on warfare, archery and ancient Indian martial arts, dating back to the 2nd-3rd millennium BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous (N) next»] — Nagapasha in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

nāgapāśa (नागपाश).—m (S) A sort of noose used in battle to entangle an enemy.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

nāgapāśa (नागपाश).—m A sort of noose used in battle to entangle an enemy.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous (N) next»] — Nagapasha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Nāgapāśa (नागपाश).—

1) a sort of magical noose used in battle to entangle an enemy.

2) Name of the noose or weapon of Varuṇa.

Derivable forms: nāgapāśaḥ (नागपाशः).

Nāgapāśa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nāga and pāśa (पाश).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgapāśa (नागपाश).—m.

(-śaḥ) 1. A weapon of Varuna the regent of water. 2. A sort of magical noose or knot, used in battle to entangle an enemy. E. nāga an elephant, and pāśa a binding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nāgapāśa (नागपाश).—m. a special kind of noose.

Nāgapāśa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms nāga and pāśa (पाश).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Nāgapāśa (नागपाश) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—father of Aṅgadeva, father of Govinda, father of Rāmeśvara, father of Nārāyaṇa (Vṛttaratnākaraṭīkā 1681). Io. 55 A.

2) Nāgapāśa (नागपाश):—read Io. 56.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Nāgapāśa (नागपाश):—[=nāga-pāśa] [from nāga] m. a sort of magical noose (used in battles), [Mahīdhara on Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā vi, 8] (cf. [Mahābhārata viii, 2586 etc.])

2) [v.s. ...] a kind of metre (= -bandha), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of Varuṇa’s weapon, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] of a man, [Catalogue(s)]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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