Malati, Mālatī, Mālati, Malaṭi: 36 definitions

Introduction:

Malati means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi, biology, Tamil. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Malti.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhavishya-purana

Malati (मलति):—The consequences of using various flowers in worship, (e.g. malati flowers) leads the worshipper in the presence of god, according to the Bhaviṣya-purāṇa (brahmaparva, 197:1-11)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Mālatī (मालती) refers to “jasmine flowers”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.38 (“Description of the dais or maṇḍapa”).—Accordingly, as Himavat prepared the wedding of Menā and Śiva: “[...] Festoons with garlands of jasmine flowers (mālatī-mālya-saṃyukta) shone, everywhere. Other articles of auspicious portent were fixed in every quarter. These and other things were carried out by Himavat for the sake of his daughter. Every activity was supervised by Garga of great ability. Everything auspicious worth mentioning found a place there. He called Viśvakarman and requested him to erect a large and spacious dais beautiful with side rostrums, altars etc. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mālatī (मालती).—(also Mālavī) the queen of Aśvapati and mother of Sāvitrī, the pativrata;1 her sons are called the Mālavas of pure Kṣatriya stock.2

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 208. 10.
  • 2) Ib. 213. 16.
Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

1) Malatī (मलती) wood is used for brushing the teeth in the month Āṣāḍha for the Anaṅgatrayodaśī-Vrata, according to the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, the Anaṅgatrayodaśī-vrata is observed in honour of Śiva for acquiring virtue, great fortune, wealth and for destruction of sins [...] This vrata is to be performed for a year from Mārgaśīra.—In Āṣāḍha, the tooth-brush is that of malatī-wood. The food taken is tilodaka. The deity to be worshipped is Umābhartṛ. The flowers used in worship are kadaṃba. The naivedya offerings is pañcakhadya. The result  accrued equals puṇḍarīka.

2) Malatī (मलती) flowers are also used in worship in the month Mārgaśīrṣa for the Anaṅgatrayodaśī-Vrata.—Accordingly, the Anaṅgatrayodaśī-vrata is observed in honour of Śiva for acquiring virtue, great fortune, wealth and for destruction of sins [...] This vrata is to be performed for a year from Mārgaśīra.—In the month of Mārgaśīrṣa, the performer should brush his teeth with the piece of mallikā-wood. The food taken is madhu. The deity to be worshipped is Anaṅga. The flowers used in worship are malati. The naivedya offerings are Fruits. The result accrued is ten aśvamedha sacrifices.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Kalpa (Formulas, Drug prescriptions and other Medicinal preparations)

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Mālatī (मालती) is another name for “Jātīkusuma” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning mālatī] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Unclassified Ayurveda definitions

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Mālatī (मालती) is a Sanskrit word referring to “Jasmine”, a species of Jasmine from the Oleaceae family of flowering plants. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. It is also known as Jātī, or as Camelī in Hindi. The official botanical name is Jasminum grandiflorum and is commonly referred to in English as “Spanish jasmine” among others. It has fragrant white flowers which open towards the evening.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Mālatī (मालती) refers to a type of syllabic metre (vṛtta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 16. In this metre, the second and the fifth syllables of a foot (pāda) are light (laghu), while the rest of the syllables are heavy (guru):

⎼⏑⎼¦⎼⏑⎼¦¦⎼⏑⎼¦⎼⏑⎼¦¦
⎼⏑⎼¦⎼⏑⎼¦¦⎼⏑⎼¦⎼⏑⎼¦¦

Mālatī falls in the Gāyatrī class of chandas (rhythm-type), which implies that verses constructed with this metre have four pādas (‘foot’ or ‘quarter-verse’) containing six syllables each.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (shastra) of performing arts, (natya—theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing Dramatic plays (nataka), construction and performance of Theater, and Poetic works (kavya).

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Mālatī (मालती) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Mālatī corresponds to Varatanu. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

2) Mālatī (मालती) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E.) in his Vṛttaratnāvalī. Nañjuṇḍa was a poet of both Kannada and Sanskrit literature flourished in the court of the famous Kṛṣṇarāja Woḍeyar of Mysore. He introduces the names of these metres (e.g., Mālatī) in 20 verses.

3) Mālatī (मालती) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (e.g., mālatī) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

4) Mālatī (मालती) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (e.g., mālatī) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

Source: Journal of the University of Bombay Volume V: Apabhramsa metres (2)

Mālatī (मालती) is the name of a catuṣpadi metre (as popularly employed by the Apabhraṃśa bards), as discussed in books such as the Chandonuśāsana, Kavidarpaṇa, Vṛttajātisamuccaya and Svayambhūchandas.—Mālatī has 27 mātrās in each of its four lines, divided into the groups of 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5 and [S] mātrās.

Chandas book cover
context information

Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Mālatī (मालती) is the name of a girl mentioned in the Mālatīmādhava written by Bhavabhūti (born about 680 CE).—Bhavabhūti’s Mālatīmādhava speaks of a woman styled Yoginī, who performed the Kāpālikavrata at the Śrīparvata and illustrates the vrata by the horrible activities of Aghoraghaṇṭa and his female disciple Kapālakuṇḍalā, who are represented as coming from the Śrīparvata and staying near the mahāśmaśāna (at Padmāvatī in the Gwalior State) containing a temple of Cāmuṇḍā to whom they were going to offer the girl Mālatī in sacrifice.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Mālatī (मालती) is the name of a River, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 16) (“On the planets—graha-bhaktiyoga”), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Mars presides over the people residing in the west half of the countries on both banks of the Śoṇa, the Narmadā and the Beas; over those residing on the banks of the Nirvindhya, the Vetravatī, the Siprā, the Godāvarī, the Veṇa, the Gaṅgā, the Payoṣṇī, the Mahānadī, the Indus, the Mālatī and the Pārā; he also presides over the country of Uttarapāṇḍya, [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): A Critical Edition and Annotated Translation by Jason Birch

Mālatī (मालती) refers to “jasmine (flowers)” which forms part of meditative practices in Yoga, according to the Svabodhodayamañjarī verse 43ff.—Accordingly, [while teaching contemplative techniques]: “One should concentrate on the fragrances of flowers, such as jasmines (mālatī). Due to having them as its support, the mind also dissolves when they dissolve [...] he is called ‘liberated-while-living’”.

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Sports, Arts and Entertainment (wordly enjoyments)

Source: archive.org: Syainika Sastra of Rudradeva with English Translation (art)

Mālatī (मालती) refers to a “fragrant flower”, according to the Śyainika-śāstra: a Sanskrit treatise dealing with the divisions and benefits of Hunting and Hawking, written by Rājā Rudradeva (or Candradeva) in possibly the 13th century.—Accordingly, [while discussing the treatment of hawks]: “[...] In the rainy season, when the clouds thunder, when the sky is lighted up with the flash of lightning, when the fragrance of the Mālatī flower delights all creatures, when the frogs croak and the peacocks dance wildly, [...] These birds should be tended in such a way that regaining their vigour they may cast off their old feathers and assume new ones just as snakes assume a new slough. [...]”.

Arts book cover
context information

This section covers the skills and profiencies of the Kalas (“performing arts”) and Shastras (“sciences”) involving ancient Indian traditions of sports, games, arts, entertainment, love-making and other means of wordly enjoyments. Traditionally these topics were dealt with in Sanskrit treatises explaing the philosophy and the justification of enjoying the pleasures of the senses.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Mālatī (मालती)—Sanskrit for a kind of white jasmine.

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: OSU Press: Cakrasamvara Samadhi

Mālatī (मालती) refers to “jasmine”, according to the Guru Mandala Worship (maṇḍalārcana) ritual often performed in combination with the Cakrasaṃvara Samādhi, which refers to the primary pūjā and sādhanā practice of Newah Mahāyāna-Vajrayāna Buddhists in Nepal.—Accordingly, “Jasmine born of spring (mālatī-mādhavī-jātī), a mystical flower species, Thus beginning joined together, an ascending flower garland”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: academia.edu: Tessitori Collection I (history)

Mālatī (मालती) is the daughter of king Candrasena from Līlāvatī, according to the “Madhu-Mālatī-copaī” by Caturbhujadāsa (classified as Rajasthani literature), which is included in the collection of manuscripts at the ‘Vincenzo Joppi’ library, collected by Luigi Pio Tessitori during his visit to Rajasthan between 1914 and 1919.—In Līlāvatī reigned king Candrasena who had a beautiful daughter, Mālatī. Madhu, also called Manohara, was the son of his minister tāraṇa Sāha. They fell in love when Mālatī looked through the curtain separating them as they were studying at school. Mālatī succeeded in overpowering Madhu with the assistance of her companion Jaitmal through the use of a vaśīkaraṇa charm and they loved each other through gandharva marriage.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as mythology, zoology, royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Biology (plants and animals)

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Malati [मालती] in the Hindi language is the name of a plant identified with Aganosma heynei (Spreng.) ined. from the Apocynaceae (Oleander) family having the following synonyms: Aganosma dichotoma, Aganosma caryophyllata, Echites dichotomus. For the possible medicinal usage of malati, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Malati in the Malayalam language is the name of a plant identified with Jasminum grandiflorum L. from the Oleaceae (Jasmine) family having the following synonyms: Jasminum officinale var. grandiflorum.

Malati [માલતી] in the Gujarati language is the name of a plant identified with Marsdenia volubilis (L. fil.) Cooke from the Apocynaceae (Oleander) family having the following synonyms: Asclepias volubilis, Dregea volubilis, Wattakaka volubilis.

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

1) Malati in India is the name of a plant defined with Aganosma calycina in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices.

2) Malati is also identified with Aganosma caryophyllata It has the synonym Echites dichotomus Roth, nom. illeg. (etc.).

3) Malati is also identified with Aganosma dichotoma It has the synonym Echites dichotomus Roth.

4) Malati is also identified with Aganosma wallichii It has the synonym Echites calycinus Wall., nom. inval. (etc.).

5) Malati is also identified with Cissampelos pareira It has the synonym Menispermum trilobus Thunb. (etc.).

6) Malati is also identified with Hiptage benghalensis It has the synonym Banisteria tetraptera Sonn. (etc.).

7) Malati is also identified with Jasminum angustifolium It has the synonym Jasminum angustifolium Ker Gawl. (etc.).

8) Malati is also identified with Jasminum auriculatum.

9) Malati is also identified with Jasminum flexile It has the synonym Jasminum yingjiangense P.Y. Bai (etc.).

10) Malati is also identified with Jasminum grandiflorum It has the synonym Jasminum officinale var. grandiflorum (L.) Stokes (etc.).

11) Malati is also identified with Jasminum officinale It has the synonym Jasminum officinale var. piliferum P.Y. Pai (etc.).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Current Science (1981)
· Bot. Comment. (1830)
· Prodromus Systematis Naturalis Regni Vegetabilis (DC.) (1824)
· Prodromus Stirpium in Horto ad Chapel Allerton vigentium (1796)
· Taxon (1981)
· Index Lectionum in Lyceo Regio Hosiano Brunsbergensi: Banisteria (1901)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Malati, for example extract dosage, pregnancy safety, chemical composition, diet and recipes, health benefits, side effects, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
context information

This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mālatī : (f.) great-flowered jasmine.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Mālatī, (f.) (fr. mālā) the great-flowered jasmine Abhp 576. Cp. mālikā. (Page 530)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mālatī (मालती).—f A common term for the rolls of wheaten flour of the size of a barleycorn used in khīra. 2 (S) Great-flowered jasmine, J. grandiflorum.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mālatī (मालती).—f Great-flowered jasmine.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mālati (मालति) or Mālatī (मालती).—f.

1) A kind of jasmine (with fragrant white flowers); तन्मन्ये क्वचिदङ्ग भृङ्गतरुणेनास्वादिता मालती (tanmanye kvacidaṅga bhṛṅgataruṇenāsvāditā mālatī) G. M.; जालकैर्मालतीनाम् (jālakairmālatīnām) Meghadūta 1; Kirātārjunīya 1.2.

2) A flower of this jasmine; शिरसि बकुलमालां मालतीभिः समेताम् (śirasi bakulamālāṃ mālatībhiḥ sametām) Ṛtusaṃhāra 2.24.

3) A bud, blossom (in general).

4) A virgin, young woman.

5) Night.

6) Moonlight.

Derivable forms: mālatiḥ (मालतिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālatī (मालती).—f. (-tī) 1. Great-flowered jasmine, (Jasminum grandiflorum.) 2. A bud, a blossom. 3. A young woman. 4. Moon-light. 5. Night. 6. A particular river. 7. A flower, (Bignonia suave olens.) 8. A shrub, (Echites caryophyllata.) 9. A species of the Jagati metre. E. Lakshmi, lata a Sautra root, to shake, affs. ac and ṅīp; or mal to hold, atac aff.; or māla Vishnu, at to go, (to be presented to,) affs. aṇ and ṅīṣ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālatī (मालती).—f. 1. A bud. 2. A young woman. 3. Moonlight. 4. Night. 5. A river. 6. Great-flowered jasmine, Jasminum grandiflorum, [Meghadūta, (ed. Gildemeister.)] 26; [Ṛtusaṃhāra] 2, 25.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālati (मालति).—[feminine] a kind of jasmine.

--- OR ---

Mālatī (मालती).—[feminine] = [preceding], a woman’s name.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Mālatī (मालती) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Meghadūtaṭīkā by Kalyāṇamalla.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mālati (मालति):—f. = mālatī, [Gīta-govinda] ([varia lectio])

2) Mālatī (मालती):—[from mālatikā] f. Jasminum Grandiflorum (plant and blossom; it bears fragrant white flowers which open towards evening), [Kāvya literature; Varāha-mihira; Suśruta]

3) [v.s. ...] Bignonia Suaveolens, [Horace H. Wilson]

4) [v.s. ...] Echites Caryophyllata, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] another species of plant (= viśalyā), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a bud, blossom, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] = kāca-mālī (?), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] a maid, virgin, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] moonlight or night, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] Name of various metres, [Colebrooke]

11) [v.s. ...] of a river, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

12) [v.s. ...] of a woman (the heroine of the drama Mālatī-mādhava q.v.)

13) [v.s. ...] of Kalyāṇa-malla’s comm. on Megha-dūta.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālatī (मालती):—(tī) 3. f. Great-flowered jasmin; a bud; young woman; moonlight; night; river; flower.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Mālatī (मालती) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Mālai, Mālaī.

[Sanskrit to German]

Malati in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Mālatī (मालती) [Also spelled malti]:—(nf) a kind of creeper that yields very sweet-smelling flowers.

context information

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mālati (ಮಾಲತಿ):—

1) [noun] the jasmine plant Jasminum grandiflorum ( = J. officinale) of Oleaceae family.

2) [noun] its fragrant flower.

3) [noun] the plant Aganosma caryophyllata of Apocynaceae family.

--- OR ---

Māḷati (ಮಾಳತಿ):—

1) [noun] the jasmine plant Jasminum grandiflorum ( = J. officinale) of Oleaceae family.

2) [noun] its fragrant flower.

3) [noun] the plant Aganosma caryophyllata of Apocynaceae family.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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Tamil dictionary

Source: DDSA: University of Madras: Tamil Lexicon

Malaṭi (மலடி) noun Feminine of மலடன். [maladan.] Sterile woman; மகப்பெறாதவள். குழந்தையை யுயிர்த்த மலடிக்குவமை கொண்டாள் [magapperathaval. kuzhanthaiyai yuyirtha maladikkuvamai kondal] (கம்பராமாயணம் உருக்காட். [kambaramayanam urukkad.] 65).

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Mālati (மாலதி) noun < mālatī.

1. Arabian jasmine. See மல்லிகை [malligai],

3. (சூடாமணிநிகண்டு [sudamaninigandu])

2. Wild jasmine. See காட்டுமல்லிகை. (சூடாமணிநிகண்டு) [kattumalligai. (sudamaninigandu)]

3. Cananga flower tree. See சிறுசெண்பகம். (சூடாமணிநிகண்டு) [sirusenpagam. (sudamaninigandu)]

4. Moonlight; சந்திரிகை. (இலக்கியச் சொல்லகராதி) [santhirigai. (ilakkiyas sollagarathi)]

5. cf. மல்லிகை. [malligai.] Lamp-stand; விளக்குத்தண்டு. (பிங்கலகண்டு) [vilakkuthandu. (pingalagandu)]

6. Salvation; நிருவாணம். (பிங்கலகண்டு) [niruvanam. (pingalagandu)]

context information

Tamil is an ancient language of India from the Dravidian family spoken by roughly 250 million people mainly in southern India and Sri Lanka.

Discover the meaning of malati in the context of Tamil from relevant books on Exotic India

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