Malati, Mālatī, Mālati: 17 definitions

Introduction

Malati means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Mālatī (मालती) is a Sanskrit word referring to “Jasmine”, a species of Jasmine from the Oleaceae family of flowering plants. It is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. It is also known as Jātī, or as Camelī in Hindi. The official botanical name is Jasminum grandiflorum and is commonly referred to in English as “Spanish jasmine” among others. It has fragrant white flowers which open towards the evening.

Source: Shodhganga: Edition translation and critical study of yogasarasamgraha

Mālatī (मालती) is another name for “Jātīkusuma” and is dealt with in the 15th-century Yogasārasaṅgraha (Yogasara-saṅgraha) by Vāsudeva: an unpublished Keralite work representing an Ayurvedic compendium of medicinal recipes. The Yogasārasaṃgraha [mentioning mālatī] deals with entire recipes in the route of administration, and thus deals with the knowledge of pharmacy (bhaiṣajya-kalpanā) which is a branch of pharmacology (dravyaguṇa).

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: Bhavishya-purana

Malati (मलति):—The consequences of using various flowers in worship, (eg. malati flowers) leads the worshipper in the presence of god, according to the Bhaviṣya-purāṇa (brahmaparva, 197:1-11)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mālatī (मालती).—(also Mālavī) the queen of Aśvapati and mother of Sāvitrī, the pativrata;1 her sons are called the Mālavas of pure Kṣatriya stock.2

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 208. 10.
  • 2) Ib. 213. 16.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Mālatī (मालती) refers to a type of syllabic metre (vṛtta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 16. In this metre, the second and the fifth syllables of a foot (pāda) are light (laghu), while the rest of the syllables are heavy (guru):

⎼⏑⎼¦⎼⏑⎼¦¦⎼⏑⎼¦⎼⏑⎼¦¦
⎼⏑⎼¦⎼⏑⎼¦¦⎼⏑⎼¦⎼⏑⎼¦¦

Mālatī falls in the Gāyatrī class of chandas (rhythm-type), which implies that verses constructed with this metre have four pādas (‘foot’ or ‘quarter-verse’) containing six syllables each.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Chandas (prosody, study of Sanskrit metres)

Source: Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature

1) Mālatī (मालती) is the alternative name of a Sanskrit metre (chandas) mentioned by Hemacandra (1088-1173 C.E.) in his auto-commentary on the second chapter of the Chandonuśāsana. Mālatī corresponds to Varatanu. Hemacandra gives these alternative names for the metres by other authorities (like Bharata), even though the number of gaṇas or letters do not differ.

2) Mālatī (मालती) refers to one of the 135 metres (chandas) mentioned by Nañjuṇḍa (1794-1868 C.E.) in his Vṛttaratnāvalī. Nañjuṇḍa was a poet of both Kannada and Sanskrit literature flourished in the court of the famous Kṛṣṇarāja Woḍeyar of Mysore. He introduces the names of these metres (eg., Mālatī) in 20 verses.

3) Mālatī (मालती) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., mālatī) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

4) Mālatī (मालती) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt with in the second chapter of the Vṛttamuktāvalī, ascribed to Durgādatta (19th century), author of eight Sanskrit work and patronised by Hindupati: an ancient king of the Bundela tribe (presently Bundelkhand of Uttar Pradesh). A Varṇavṛtta (eg., mālatī) refers to a type of classical Sanskrit metre depending on syllable count where the light-heavy patterns are fixed.

Chandas book cover
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Chandas (छन्दस्) refers to Sanskrit prosody and represents one of the six Vedangas (auxiliary disciplines belonging to the study of the Vedas). The science of prosody (chandas-shastra) focusses on the study of the poetic meters such as the commonly known twenty-six metres mentioned by Pingalas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Mālatī (मालती)—Sanskrit for a kind of white jasmine.

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

mālatī : (f.) great-flowered jasmine.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Mālatī, (f.) (fr. mālā) the great-flowered jasmine Abhp 576. Cp. mālikā. (Page 530)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mālatī (मालती).—f A common term for the rolls of wheaten flour of the size of a barleycorn used in khīra. 2 (S) Great-flowered jasmine, J. grandiflorum.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

mālatī (मालती).—f Great-flowered jasmine.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mālati (मालति) or Mālatī (मालती).—f.

1) A kind of jasmine (with fragrant white flowers); तन्मन्ये क्वचिदङ्ग भृङ्गतरुणेनास्वादिता मालती (tanmanye kvacidaṅga bhṛṅgataruṇenāsvāditā mālatī) G. M.; जालकैर्मालतीनाम् (jālakairmālatīnām) Me.1; Ki.1.2.

2) A flower of this jasmine; शिरसि बकुलमालां मालतीभिः समेताम् (śirasi bakulamālāṃ mālatībhiḥ sametām) Ṛs.2.24.

3) A bud, blossom (in general).

4) A virgin, young woman.

5) Night.

6) Moonlight.

Derivable forms: mālatiḥ (मालतिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mālatī (मालती).—f. (-tī) 1. Great-flowered jasmine, (Jasminum grandiflorum.) 2. A bud, a blossom. 3. A young woman. 4. Moon-light. 5. Night. 6. A particular river. 7. A flower, (Bignonia suave olens.) 8. A shrub, (Echites caryophyllata.) 9. A species of the Jagati metre. E. Lakshmi, lata a Sautra root, to shake, affs. ac and ṅīp; or mal to hold, atac aff.; or māla Vishnu, at to go, (to be presented to,) affs. aṇ and ṅīṣ .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Mālatī (मालती) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—Meghadūtaṭīkā by Kalyāṇamalla.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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