Mahodaya, Mahodayā, Maha-udaya: 18 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Mahodaya means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Mahoday.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Mahodaya in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Mahodaya (महोदय) is the city city of Kubera, guardian (dikpāla) of the northern direction, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 76.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Mahodaya (महोदय).—One of the sons of Vasiṣṭha. Once Triśaṅku, King of Ayodhyā, conducted a yāga with Viśvāmitra as Ṛtvik and for that yāga Viśvāmitra invited Vasiṣṭha and his son Mahodaya also. But Mahodaya refused to respond to the invitation and sent a message picturing both Viśvāmitra and Triśaṅku as Caṇḍālas. Enraged at this insulting message Viśvāmitra cursed Mahodaya to become Śūdra. (Verses 20-21, Bāla Kāṇḍa, Chapter 59, Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mahodayā (महोदया).—The sabhā of the Lord of the Nakṣatras, the seats and altars of pure beryl.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 34. 90.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Mahodayā (महोदया) refers to the city of Kubera or Soma, situated on the northern lower slope of mount Meru, according to Parākhyatantra 5.66. Meru is the name of a golden mountained situated in the middle of nine landmasses (navakhaṇḍa): Bhārata, Hari, Kimpuruṣa, Ramyaka, Ramaṇa, Kuru, Bhadrāśva, Ketumāla and Ilāvṛta. Together these khaṇḍas make up the continent known as Jambūdvīpa.

Mahodayā is also known by the name Prabhā or Prabhāvatī, and is mentioned in various other sources, eg., the Svacchanda-tantra 10.132-136, Kiraṇa-āgama 8.51-54, Mṛgendra-āgama vidyāpāda 13.47-54, Sarvajñānottara-tantra adhvaprakaraṇa 34-36 and Mataṅga-āgama vidyāpāda 23.60-63

The Parākhyatantra is an old Śaiva-siddhānta tantra dating from before the 10th century.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Mahodaya in Kavya glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The Kavyamimamsa of Rajasekhara

Mahodaya (महोदय) is the name a locality mentioned in Rājaśekhara’s 10th-century Kāvyamīmāṃsā.—Kanauj or Kānyakubja.

context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Mahodayā (महोदया) is another name for Bhadrodanī, an unidentified medicinal plant, according to verse 4.103-105 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The fourth chapter (śatāhvādi-varga) of this book enumerates eighty varieties of small plants (pṛthu-kṣupa). Note: Narhari’s Bhadrodanī may be Rājabalā of Dh. [Dhanvantari?]. Together with the names Mahodayā and Bhadrodanī, there are a total of sixteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Tibetan Buddhism

Mahodaya (महोदय) is the name of a Śrāvaka mentioned as attending the teachings in the 6th century Mañjuśrīmūlakalpa: one of the largest Kriyā Tantras devoted to Mañjuśrī (the Bodhisattva of wisdom) representing an encyclopedia of knowledge primarily concerned with ritualistic elements in Buddhism. The teachings in this text originate from Mañjuśrī and were taught to and by Buddha Śākyamuni in the presence of a large audience (including Mahodaya).

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Mahodaya.—(IA 18), used in the sense of Svāmin or possessor. Note: mahodaya is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

mahōdaya (महोदय).—m S A certain festival,--a day of synchronism of all the particulars enumerated under ardhōdaya except one.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahodaya (महोदय).—a. very prosperous or lucky, very glorious or splendid, of great prosperity. (-yaḥ) 1 (a) great elevation or rise, greatness, prosperity; नन्दस्त्वतीन्द्रियं दृष्ट्वा लोकपालमहोदयम् (nandastvatīndriyaṃ dṛṣṭvā lokapālamahodayam) Bhāg.1.28.1; अपवर्ग- महोदयार्थयोर्भुवमंशाविव धर्मयोर्गतौ (apavarga- mahodayārthayorbhuvamaṃśāviva dharmayorgatau) R.8.16. (b) great fortune or good luck. (c) greatness, pre-eminence.

2) final beatitude.

3) a lord, master.

4) Name of the district called Kānyakubja or Kanouja; see App.

5) Name of the capital of Kanouja.

6) sour milk mixed with honey.

7) = महात्मन् (mahātman) q. v.; संसक्तौ किमसुलभं महोदयानाम (saṃsaktau kimasulabhaṃ mahodayānāma) Ki.7.27. °पर्वन् (parvan) a time of union of the middle of श्रवण नक्षत्र (śravaṇa nakṣatra) and the end of व्यतिपात (vyatipāta) (generally in the month of māgha or pauṣa at the beginning of amāvāsyā).

Mahodaya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and udaya (उदय).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahodaya (महोदय).—n.

(-yaṃ) Kanouj, the ancient city and district. m.

(-yaḥ) 1. Final beatitude, emancipation from vitality and absorption into the divine essence. 2. Prosperity, elevation, eminence. 3. Pride. 4. Abandoning, relinquishment. 5. A master, a lord. 6. Sour milk mixed with honey. E. mahā great, udaya rising, splendour, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahodaya (महोदय).—I. m. 1. prosperity. 2. final beatitude. 3. covereignty. 4. a lord. 5. the country of Kanoj. 6. a proper name, [Rājataraṅgiṇī] 5, 28. Ii. n. Kanoj. Yathā-udaya + m, adv. in proportion to one’s income, [Yājñavalkya, (ed. Stenzler.)] 2, 43.

Mahodaya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and udaya (उदय).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahodaya (महोदय).—1. [masculine] great happiness, bliss.

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Mahodaya (महोदय).—2. [adjective] very fortunate or lucky.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mahodaya (महोदय):—[from mahā > mah] m. great fortune or prosperity, [Kāvya literature; Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] pre-eminence, sovereignty, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] final emancipation, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] mfn. conferring gr° fortune or prosperity, very fortunate, [Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] thinking one’s self very lucky, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] m. a lord, master, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

7) [v.s. ...] sour milk with honey, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] Name of a Vāsiṣṭha, [Rāmāyaṇa]

9) [v.s. ...] of a royal chamberlain (who built a temple), [Rājataraṅgiṇī] (cf. below)

10) [v.s. ...] of another man, [Mahābhārata]

11) [v.s. ...] of a mountain, [Rāmāyaṇa]

12) Mahodayā (महोदया):—[from mahodaya > mahā > mah] f. Name of the city and district of Kānya-kubja, [Bālarāmāyaṇa] (also m., [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.])

13) [v.s. ...] f. Uraria Lagopodioides, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

14) [v.s. ...] an overgrown maiden, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

15) [v.s. ...] Name of a mythical town on mount Meru, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa [Scholiast or Commentator]]

16) [v.s. ...] of a hall or dwelling in the world of the moon, [Kādambarī]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahodaya (महोदय):—[maho+daya] (yaṃ) 1. n. Kanoj. m. Final beatitude; abandoning, leaving; prosperity; pride.

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Mahodaya (महोदय):—1. (mahā + u) m. grosses Glück, grosser Segen: utpannapaścāttāpasya buddhirbhavati yādṛśī . tādṛśī yadi pūrvaṃ syātkasya na syānmahodayaḥ .. [VṚDDHA-Cāṇakya 14, 7.] [Raghuvaṃśa 8, 16.] pārameṣṭhya [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 3, 16, 15.] gṛhāt mahodayodayāt [4, 13, 47.] hṛte rājyamahodaye (vielleicht rājye zu lesen) [KĀM. NĪTIS. 14, 50.] pranaṣṭasya yathā lābho yathā harṣamahodayaḥ [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 20, 17.] harṣo ma ed. Bomb.; der Schol. mahaḥ putrajanmādyutsavaḥ tasmādudayo yasya sa harṣaḥ. = ādhipatya Oberherrschaft [Medinīkoṣa y. 125.] = apavarga, mukti die letzte Befreiung der Seele [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 75.] [Anekārthasaṃgraha 4, 228.] [Medinīkoṣa] = svāmin (svāmi vielleicht nur Druckfehler für svāmya) Herr, Besitzer [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha]

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Mahodaya (महोदय):—2. (wie eben)

1) adj. grosses Glück verleihend, sehr segensreich: lokāḥ [Spr. 1366. 5170.] [Rāmāyaṇa 3, 8, 20. 6, 8, 33.] rājya [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 7, 55.] [Harivaṃśa 12212.] vanavāsa [Rāmāyaṇa 2, 22, 29.] vṛkṣa [Harivaṃśa 7670.] vacana [Rāmāyaṇa 5, 91, 13.] yaśas [2, 21, 62.] kalyāṇaṃ sumahodayam [KĀM. NĪTIS. 5, 49.] —

2) m. a) saure Milch mit Honig [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 833.] — b) Nomen proprium eines Mannes [Mahābhārata 13, 7678] (mahodarya ed. Bomb.). eines Vāsiṣṭha [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 59, 11. 15. 20.] eines Thorstehers, der ein nach ihm benanntes Heiligthum Mahodayasvāmin gründete, [Rājataraṅgiṇī 5, 28.] — c) Nomen proprium eines Berges [Rāmāyaṇa 4, 37, 8.] —

3) m. ( [Medinīkoṣa y. 125]), f. ā ( [Halāyudha 2, 132)] und n. ([Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 973.] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha]) Nomen proprium einer Stadt (= kānyakubja): kuśanābhastu dharmātmā puraṃ cakre mahodayam [Rāmāyaṇa.1,34,6] [?(35,5 Gorresio). Oxforder Handschriften.9,a,24.] —

4) f. ā a) Uraria logopodioides DC. [Rājanirghaṇṭa im Śabdakalpadruma] — b) Name eines Saales in der Mondwelt [KĀD.] in [morgenländischen Gesellschaft 7, 587.]

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Mahodaya (महोदय):—1. , nanu dharmanivṛttau nirmalajñānodayo mahodayaḥ [SARVADARŚANAS. 117, 3. 17, 11.]

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Mahodaya (महोदय):—2.

1) adj. auch sich überaus glücklich fühlend [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 10, 35, 26.] mahānudaya utsavo yāsāṃ tāḥ Comm. —

3) f. ā Nomen proprium einer mythischen Stadt auf dem Meru [Scholiast] zu [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 5, 16, 30.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Mahodaya (महोदय):—1. m.

1) grosses Glück , grosser Segen.

2) *Oberherrschaft.

3) *die letzte Befreiung der Seele.

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Mahodaya (महोदय):—2. —

1) Adj. — a) grosses Glück verleihend , sehr segensreich. — b) sich überaus glücklich fühlend.

2) m. — a) *Herr , Besitzer. — b) *saure Milch mit Honig. — c) Nomen proprium — α) verschiedener Männer. — β) eines Berges. —

3) (*m. f. ā) n. Beiname der Stadt Kānyakubjs [Bālarāmāyaṇa 306,6.] —

4) f. ā — a) Uraria lagopodioides [Rājan 4,105.] — b) Nomen proprium — α) einer mythischen Stadt auf dem Meru. — β) eines Saales in der Mondwelt.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahodaya in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Mahodaya (महोदय) [Also spelled mahoday]:—(a) Sir; an honorofic used as a form of address or otherwise; hence [mahodayā] madam.

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