Anangatrayodashi, Anaṅgatrayodaśī, Ananga-trayodashi: 1 definition

Introduction

Introduction:

Anangatrayodashi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Anaṅgatrayodaśī can be transliterated into English as Anangatrayodasi or Anangatrayodashi, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (A) next»] — Anangatrayodashi in Purana glossary
Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Anaṅgatrayodaśī (अनङ्गत्रयोदशी) or Anaṅgatrayodaśīvrata refers to type of Vrata (“religious observances”), according to the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, The Anaṅgatrayodaśī-vrata is described in the sixteenth chapter of the Saurapurāṇa. This vow is observed in honour of Śiva for acquiring virtue, great fortune, wealth and for destruction of sins. It is stated that Lord Śiva burnt Kāmadeva in the thirteenth day of bright fortnight in the month of Mārgaśīra. Hence this particular tithi is known as Anaṅgatrayodaśī.

Accordingly:—

Having controlled his sense organs the vow-performer takes bath early in the morning on that day. Then he worships Lord Śiva with extreme devotion by offering different kinds of flowers, incense and fruits. Then he should offer one hundred and eight homas with sesamam seeds (tila) in the name of Śaṃbhu and worshipping by the name Anaṅga and taking honey as meal should sleep at night. By following this method of worshipping Śiva he can attain the result of ten aśvamedha sacrifices.

This vrata is to be performed for a year from Mārgaśīra. In every month a separate name of the Lord is to be worshipped and the text further gives the list of foods to be taken, the toothbrush of different woods to be used, the flowers and offerings of naivedya are also mentioned month wise with the accompaniment of the accrued results.

First month: In the month of Mārgaśīrṣa, the performer should brush his teeth with the piece of mallikā-wood. The food taken is madhu. The deity to be worshipped is Anaṅga. The flowers used in worship are malati. The naivedya offerings are Fruits. The result accrued is ten aśvamedha sacrifices.

Second month: In the month of Pauṣa, the tooth-brush is that of khādira-wood. The food taken is candana. The deity to be worshipped is Yogeśvara. The flowers used in worship are marubhaka. The naivedya offerings is odana. The result  accrued is rājasūya.

Third month: In the month of Magha, the tooth-brush is that of plakṣa-wood. The food taken is mauktika. The deity to be worshipped is Naṭeśvara. The flowers used in worship are karavīra. The naivedya offerings is kṛśara. The result  accrued is vahusvama.

Fourth month: In the month of Phālguna, the tooth-brush is that of apāmārga-wood. The food taken is kaṅkola. The deity to be worshipped is Vīra. The flowers used in worship are kunda. The naivedya offerings are sweet meats. The result  accrued is gomedha.

Fifth month: In Caitra, the tooth-brush is that of jambu-wood. The food taken is karpura. The deity to be worshipped is Surūpa. The flowers used in worship are arkapatra. The naivedya offerings is kaṃsara [kaṃsāra?]. The result  accrued equals naramedha.

Sixth month: In Vaiśākha, the tooth-brush is that of udumbara-wood. The food taken is jātīphala. The deity to be worshipped is Mahārūpa. The flowers used in worship are mandāra. The naivedya offerings is yavaka. The result  accrued equals the gift of thousand cows.

Seventh month: In Jyeṣṭha, the tooth-brush is that of aśvattha-wood. The food taken is lavaṅga. The deity to be worshipped is Pradyumna. The flowers used in worship are mallikā. The naivedya offerings is sohalikā. The result  accrued equals vajapeya.

Eighth month: In Āṣāḍha, the tooth-brush is that of malatī-wood. The food taken is tilodaka. The deity to be worshipped is Umābhartṛ. The flowers used in worship are kadaṃba. The naivedya offerings is pañcakhadya [pañcakhādya?]. The result  accrued equals puṇḍarīka.

Ninth month: In Śravaṇa, the tooth-brush is that of vaṭa-wood. The food taken is gandhatoya. The deity to be worshipped is Śūlapāṇi. The flowers used in worship are yūthikā. The naivedya offerings is ghṛtapura. The result accrued equals agniṣṭoma.

Tenth month: In the Bhādrapada, the tooth-brush is that of kadaṃba-wood. The food taken is aguru. The deity to be worshipped is Sadyojāta. The flowers used in worship are dhattūra. The naivedya offerings is śālibhakta. The result accrued equals all sacrifices.

Eleventh month: In the month of Āśvina, the tooth-brush is that of durvā-wood. The food taken is svamodaka[?]. The deity to be worshipped is Tridaśādhipati. The flowers used in worship are śatapatraka. The naivedya offerings is guṇaka. The result accrued equals gift of crores of gold.

Twelfth month: In the month of Kārttika, the tooth-brush is that of śirīṣa-wood. The food taken is madanaphala. The deity to be worshipped is Kārttika. The flowers used in worship are dūrvāṅkura. The naivedya offerings is different kinds of food. The result accrued equals lusturous like Kāmadeva.

Further the text gives the mantras to be employed in this vow. After the completion of one year the devotee should make an idol of Śiva in gold and placing the idol in a copper-plate, put it on the jar (kalaśa). Then covering these with white cloth he should worship Śiva. Then gifts are to be given to Brāhmaṇas, preceptors with food. If anybody performs Anaṅgatrayodaśī-vrata like this gets mastry over kingdom, fortune, progeny and finally goes to Śivaloka.

Note: This Anaṅgatrayodaśī-vrata is referred in the Agnipurāṇa 191.1-10; Bhaviṣvapurāṇa, Uttarabhāga 90.1-49; Garudapurāṇa 117.1-15; See also Hemādri’s Caturvargacintāmaṇi Vratakhaṇḍa II.1-9.

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context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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