Jada, Jaḍa: 11 definitions

Introduction

Jada means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra

Jaḍa (जड) refers to “idiot” (one who is devoid of intelligence). The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 7.149)

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Jaḍa (जड).—An immoral brahmin. Jaḍa, who set out to do commercial business once was killed by thieves. As a result of sins committed in previous births he was turned into a Piśāca. After his death his son, who led quite a moral life went to Kāśī (Banares) to perform his father’s obsequies, and at the particular spot where his father was living as Piśāca the son recited Chapter 3 of the Gītā, on hearing which Jaḍa got released from his state as Piśāca. (Padma Purāṇa, Uttarakhaṇḍa and Mārkaṇḍeya Purāṇa).

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: eScholarship: Chapters 1-14 of the Hayasirsa Pancaratra

Jaḍa (जड) refers to “one who is a non-irrational”, representing an undesirable characteristic of an Ācārya, according to the 9th-century Hayaśīrṣa-pañcarātra Ādikāṇḍa chapter 3.—The Lord said:—“I will tell you about the Sthāpakas endowed with perverse qualities. He should not construct a temple with those who are avoided in this Tantra. [...] He should not be a Punarbhū, a Svayambhū, a widow’s bastard, or a non-believer, nor irrational (jaḍa), pale, bald or crippled or fat. [...] A god enshrined by any of these named above (viz., jaḍa), is in no manner a giver of fruit. If a building for Viṣṇu is made anywhere by these excluded types (viz., jaḍa) then that temple will not give rise to enjoyment and liberation and will yield no reward, of this there is no doubt”.

Pancaratra book cover
context information

Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhagavad-gita (4th edition)

Jaḍa (जड) refers to “inert, dull”. (cf. Glossary page from Śrīmad-Bhagavad-Gītā).

Vaishnavism book cover
context information

Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jaḍa (जड).—a (S) Heavy. 2 fig. Dull, stupid, obtuse, sluggish, slow. 3 Cold, phlegmatic, apathetic. 4 Heavy of digestion. 5 Grievous, afflictive, mournful. 6 Difficult or arduous: also important or momentous--a work, an affair. Pr. kēlēṃ nāhīṃ taṃvara jaḍa khāllēṃ nāhīṃ taṃvara gōḍa. 7 Of dignity, influence, authority. 8 Costly; of high price or worth. 9 Profound, grave, abstruse--a treatise, discourse, subject. 10 Severe--a disease. 11 Languid, listless, lethargic. 12 Inanimate, inert, material. 13 Hard;--used of water, in opp. to halakā Soft or light. 14 In grammar. Double--a letter. 15 In philosophy. Solid;--opp. to fluid, aëriform, or gaseous: also as s n A solid body; or a material body. jaḍa dharaṇēṃ To hold or esteem highly. jaḍa vāṭaṇēṃ To feel heavy, hard, difficult, grievous, irksome &c. jaḍa sāṅgaṇēṃ To increase on; to become more and more serious--disease or a difficulty of which the remedy is procrastinated; to tell hearily in the end.

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jaḍa (जड).—f ( H) A root or a ramification.

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jaḍa (जड).—f (jaḍaṇēṃ) Stock, capital, property, heap. Ex. tyā sāvakārācī lākha rupayāñcī jaḍa āhē.

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jāḍa (जाड).—a Thick--a plank &c.: thick or coarse--cloth: thick, not dilute--liquids: stout, sturdy--the body. 2 (Used for jaḍa) Large and heavylooking--a load.

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jāḍā (जाडा).—a ( H) jāḍagā a Thick--a plank, post &c.: thick or coarse--cloth: stout, sturdy, robust--the body: deep, solid, substantial with sense, learning, talent &c.--a paṇḍita, kavi, kavitā, kalpanā, kōṭi, lēkha &c.

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jādā (जादा).—a ind ( A) More. The is ja.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

jaḍa (जड).—a Heavy. Fig. Dull, stupid, slug gish, slow. Cold, apathetic. Heavy of digestion. Grievous, afflictive, mournful. Difficult or arduous: also important or momentous-a work, an affair. Of dignity, influence, autho- rity. Costly, of high price or worth. Profound, grave, abstruse-a treatise, subject. Severe-a disease. Languid, listless, lethargic. Inanimate, inert- material. Hard-used of water. jaḍa vāṭaṇēṃ To feel heavy, hard, grievous, irksome.

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jaḍa (जड).—f Stock, capital, property.

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jāḍā (जाडा).—a Thick, Coarse-cloth. Stout, sturdy-the body. Deep, solid, substantial with sense, learning, talent &c.-a paṇḍita, kavi, kalpanā, kōṭi.

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jādā (जादा).—a ind More.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jaḍa (जड).—a. [jalati ghanībhavati jal ac lasya ḍaḥ Tv.]

1) Cold, frigid, chilly; Māl.9.13; U.6.13.

2) Dull, paralysed, motionless, benumbed; चिन्ताजडं दर्शनम् (cintājaḍaṃ darśanam) Ś.4.5; U.3.41; 6.28;6.39; परामृशन् हर्षजडेन पाणिना (parāmṛśan harṣajaḍena pāṇinā) R.3.68;2.42.

3) Dull, senseless, stupid, irrational, dull-witted; जडा- नन्धान् पङ्गून (jaḍā- nandhān paṅgūna) ... त्रातुम् (trātum) G. L.15, so जडधी, जडमति (jaḍadhī, jaḍamati) &c. Y.2. 25; Ms.2.11; जडबुद्धिः, जडप्रकृतिः (jaḍabuddhiḥ, jaḍaprakṛtiḥ), Ratn.2 (between verses 12 and 13); also जडाशयः (jaḍāśayaḥ) Ks.6.58,132.

4) Dulled made senseless or apathetic, devoid of appreciation or taste; वेदाभ्यासजडः कथं नु विषयव्यावृत्त- कौतूहलः (vedābhyāsajaḍaḥ kathaṃ nu viṣayavyāvṛtta- kautūhalaḥ) V.1.9.

5) Stunning, benumbing, stupefying.

6) Dumb.

7) Unable to learn the Vedas (Dāyabhāga).

-ḍaḥ 1 Cold, frost, winter.

2) Idiocy, stupidity.

3) Dulness, apathy, sluggishness.

-ḍam 1 Water.

2) Lead.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Jaḍa (जड).—= Sanskrit jala, water: Lalitavistara 372.15 (all mss., both edd.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jaḍa (जड).—[adjective] cold, cool; apathetic, stupid, idiotic; [masculine] an idiot. — Abstr. [feminine], tva [neuter]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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