Halahala, aka: Halāhala, Hālāhala, Halahalā, Hālahala; 11 Definition(s)

Introduction

Halahala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Halahala in Purana glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

1a) Hālāhala (हालाहल).—(Hālāhalam)—the poison that first issued from the Amṛtamathana. Śiva consumed it with Pārvati's permission. That which was split became poisonous scorpions, serpents, cobras and other plants;1 administered to Prahlāda.2

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa VIII. 7. 18. 46.
  • 2) Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 15. 154; 16. 10; 18. 3.

1b) The XI battle between the Gods and the Asuras.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 72. 75, 86.

1c) The eleventh of the twelve incarnations in Vārāha kalpa;1 Vṛtra killed by Mahendra.2

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 47. 45; Vāyu-purāṇa 97. 76.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 47. 51.

1d) A son of Ariṣṭakarman, and father of Palalaka.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 24. 46-7.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Hālāhala (हालाहल).—According to Purāṇic texts hālāhala poison came out on the surface when the milky ocean was churned by gods and demons. In order to save the world from the danger Śiva consumed it. Pārvati, his consort sees that it rests in his neck and will not descend down to his stomach. By the time she could put her hand under the effect of the poison Śiva has nausea and reclines. His consort comes to fan him etc. Śiva consumption of the poison is a common story recounted in many purāṇa texts but his reclining is rarely mentioned.

Source: Archaeological Survey of India: Śaiva monuments at Paṭṭadakal (purāṇa)
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Halahala in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

Hālāhala (हालाहल) or Hālāhalatantra refers to one of the twenty Bhūtatantras, belonging to the Śāktāgama (or Śāktatantra) division of the Āgama tradition. The Śāktāgamas represent the wisdom imparted by Devī to Īśvara and convey the idea that the worship of Śakti is the means to attain liberation. According to the Pratiṣṭhālakṣaṇasamuccaya of Vairocana, the Śāktatantras are divided into to four parts, the Hālāhala-tantra belonging to the Bhūta class.

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (shaktism)
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Halahala in Jainism glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

Hālāhala (हालाहल) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Hālāhala] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Halahala in Pali glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

1) Halāhala, 2 (nt.) (onomat.) uproar, tumult J.I, 47 sq.; Miln.122. Cp. kolāhala. (Page 730)

2) Halāhala, 1 (onomat.; cp. Sk. halāhala) a kind of deadly poison, usually as °visa J.I, 271, 273, 380; III, 103; V, 465; Miln.256; Vism.57; ThA.287. (Page 730)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Halahala in Marathi glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

halāhala (हलाहल).—n (S) Poison produced from the ocean upon the churning of it by the gods and titans. 2 Hence The venom of serpents, or vehement poison in general.

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haḷahaḷa (हळहळ) [or हळहाळ, haḷahāḷa].—f (halāhala in bālabhāṣā Interjection of pain or anxiety.) Inquietude; painful restlessness or painful apprehension; great perturbation or uneasiness (of body or of mind). v lāga, vāṭa, kara. Ex. nāhīṃ bhaktīcēṃ baḷa || taṃvavarī haḷahaḷarē haḷahaḷarē ||. 2 Painful regret. v lāga, kara. haḷahaḷīcā māla Goods occasioning to the seller great distress or trouble of mind.

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hālāhala (हालाहल).—n S Poison &c. See halāhala.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

halāhala (हलाहल).—n Vehement poison.

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haḷahaḷa (हळहळ).—f Inquietude; great un- easiness. Painful regret.

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haḷahāḷa (हळहाळ).—f Inquietude; great un- easiness. Painful regret.

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hālāhala (हालाहल).—n Poison.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Halahala in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [H] · next »

Halahala (हलहल).—a. Ploughing, making furrows.

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Halahalā (हलहला).—An exclamation of applause or approbation.

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Halāhala (हलाहल).—

1) = हाल (hāla)()हल (hala).

2) A kind of snake.

3) A sort of lizard.

4) A kind of deadly poison; see हाल (hāla)()हलम् (halam).

Derivable forms: halāhalaḥ (हलाहलः), halāhalam (हलाहलम्).

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Hālahala (हालहल) or Hālāhala (हालाहल).—

1) A sort of deadly poison produced at the churning of the ocean; (being of a very virulent character it began to burn up everything when it was swallowed by the god Śiva); अहमेव गुरुः सुदारुणानामिति हालाहल मास्म तात दृप्यः । ननु सन्ति भवादृशानि भूयो भुवनेऽस्मिन् वचनानि दुर्जनानाम् (ahameva guruḥ sudāruṇānāmiti hālāhala māsma tāta dṛpyaḥ | nanu santi bhavādṛśāni bhūyo bhuvane'smin vacanāni durjanānām) Subhāṣ.; हालाहलं न विषं विषं रमा (hālāhalaṃ na viṣaṃ viṣaṃ ramā) Subhāṣ.

2) (Hence) A deadly poison or poison in general; हालाहलं खलु पिपासति कौतुकेन (hālāhalaṃ khalu pipāsati kautukena) Bv.1.95;2.73; मधु तिष्ठति वाचि योषितां हृदये हालहलं महद्विषम् (madhu tiṣṭhati vāci yoṣitāṃ hṛdaye hālahalaṃ mahadviṣam) Pt.1.188. (Also written halāhala or hālahāla).

Derivable forms: hālahalam (हालहलम्), hālāhalam (हालाहलम्).

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Hālāhala (हालाहल).—1 A kind of insect.

2) A kind of lizard.

-lā A small mouse.

-lī Spirituous liquor.

-lam 1 = हालहल (hālahala) (1).

2) Spirituous liquor.

Derivable forms: hālāhalaḥ (हालाहलः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Halāhala (हलाहल).—mn.

(-laḥ-laṃ) 1. A sort of deadly poison produced at the churning of the ocean. 2. A poison in general. m.

(-laḥ) 1. A kind of snake. 2. A Jaina or Baud'dha deified saint. 3. A sort of lizard or newt. E. hal to plough, ac aff., a negative, and hala the same; also halahala, hālahala, hālāhala, hahala, hāhala and hāhāla .

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Hālahala (हालहल).—n.

(-laṃ) 1. A sort of deadly poison. 2. A poison in general: see the next. f. (-lī) Spirituous liquor.

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Hālahāla (हालहाल).—n.

(-laṃ) 1. A sort of deadly poison. 2. A poison in general; also variously read, halāhala, halahala, hālahala, hālāhala hāhāla, and hāhala .

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Hālāhala (हालाहल).—n.

(-laṃ) 1. A sort of deadly poison produced at the churning of the ocean and quaffed by Siva. 2. A poison in general. f.

(-lā) A small mouse. f. (-lī) Wine, spirituous liquor. m.

(-laḥ) A sort of worm or insect, a kind of newt.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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