Hala, aka: Hālā, Hāla, Halā; 14 Definition(s)

Introduction

Hala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

[Hala in Purana glossaries]

Hala (हल, “Ploughshare”):—The Vāyu-purāṇa mentions this as a weapon of Kṛṣṇa’s brother Balarāma who is called Halin; the only other wielder of this weapon is Śiva according to the Vāyu-purāṇa.

(Source): Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

1a) Hala (हल).—A weapon peculiar to Balarāma; reached him during the siege of Mathurā.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 50. 11 [15]; Vāyu-purāṇa 23. 199; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 22. 7.

1b) A Dānava.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 6. 11.

1c) A Trayārṣeya.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 200. 14.

2) Halā (हला).—One of Atri's ten wives.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 8. 75.

3a) Hāla (हाल).—A Trayārṣeya.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 200. 14.

3b) An Āndhra king; ruled for five years (one kings.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 273. 9; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 165; Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 352.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

[Hala in Shilpashastra glossaries]

Hala.—This is the ordinary Indian plough, probably extemporised as a weapon of war.

(Source): Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Hala (हल, “plough”).—According to mythology, hala and musala are the original weapons of Ananta. They are also known as vaiṣṇava-praharanāni. The Harivaṃśa says they were first made available to Balarāma before his fight with King Jarāsandha of Rājagṛha. Sunanda and Saṃvartaka were the respective names of his divine weapons.

(Source): Google Books: Iconography of Balarāma
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[Hala in Shaivism glossaries]

Hālā (हाला) is the name of a sacred site (pīṭha) to be assigned to the navel (nābhi) during the pīṭhavidhi (‘ritual of sacred sites’) according to the Tantrāloka chapter 29. This chapter of the Tantrāloka by Abhinavagupta expounds details regarding the Kula initiation ritual. Kula or Kaula is a specific tradition within Śaivism, closely related to Siddhānta and Śaktism. In the Jñānārṇava-tantra it is also mentioned as a pīṭha and is also called Kolvagiri.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śaivism

Hala (हल) or Halāgama refers to one of upāgamas (supplementary scriptures) of the Vīrāgama which is one of the twenty-eight Siddhāntāgama: a classification of the Śaiva division of Śaivāgamas. The Śaivāgamas represent the wisdom that has come down from lord Śiva, received by Pārvatī and accepted by Viṣṇu. The purpose of revealing upāgamas (eg., Hala Āgama) is to explain more elaborately than that of mūlāgamas (eg., Vīra-āgama) and to include any new idea if not dealt in mūlāgamas.

(Source): Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Hala in Natyashastra glossaries]

Halā (हला, “hallo”) refers to a specific “mode of address” (nāman) used in drama (nāṭya), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 19. Halā is used by women friends in addressing one another among their equals.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Katha (narrative stories)

[Hala in Katha glossaries]

Hāla (हाल).—V. Smith is of the opinion that Hāla Satavahana of the Andhra Satavahana dynasty which came into being about 220 B.C. ruled yabout 68 or 58 A.D. and that he is the patron of three works, viz.the Saptaśatī, Guṇaḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā and the Kātantra Vyākaraṇa. These three works must be placed about 60-70 A.D.

Rājaśekhara refers to him as the king of Kuntala, who had ordered the exclusive use of Prākṛta in his harem. He has also mentioned him in the list of Sabhapat given in his Kāvyamīmāṃsa. Bāṇa in his Harṣacarita praises him for his Saptaśatī or Kośa.

(Source): Shodhganga: A critical appreciation of soddhalas udayasundarikatha
Katha book cover
context information

Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[Hala in Jainism glossaries]

1) Hala (हल) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Hala] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

2) Hāla (हाल) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Hāla] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

(Source): archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

[Hala in India history glossaries]

Hala (r. 61-66 CE) is a king from the Sātavāhana dynasty of ancient India. The Sātavāhana lineage (known as Andhra in the Purāṇas) once ruled much of the Deccan region and several of the Ajantā caves at West-Khandesh (West-Khaṇḍeśa, modern Jalgaon) were carved in the 3rd century BCE when the region was ruled by kings (eg., Hala) and descendants of the Sātavāhana kings. Hala was preceded by Gaurakṛṣṇa and succeeded by Maṇḍalaka (Puttalka, Pulumāvi II).

(Source): Shodhganga: Ajanta’s antiquity
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Hala in Pali glossaries]

hala : (nt.) a plough.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[Hala in Marathi glossaries]

hala (हल).—m S A plough.

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haḷa (हळ).—f A blast of hot air (heated whether by the sun or by a fire).

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haḷa (हळ).—m A long trench or narrow channel. See under hāḷa.

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haḷa (हळ).—m (hala S) A plough.

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haḷa (हळ).—f & haḷa m Properly hāḷa.

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haḷā (हळा).—a Commonly haḷavā a.

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hāla (हाल).—m ( A) Distressful or calamitous condition; the wretchedness or wofulness (of indigence, fatigue, hunger, disgrace &c.) The word well corresponds with Pickle, plight, mess, trim &c.; or, as it is ever used in the plural, with Straits, extremities &c. v kāḍha, bhōga, sōsa, ghē, hō, & dē, pāḍa, kara. hāla asē jhālē kīṃ kutrēṃ khāīnā Expressive of the very extremity of wretchedness and abjectness.

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hāla (हाल).—f Fixed resolution or purpose; any doggedly or steadily held determination. v bāndha, sōḍa. Ex. hā āpalī hāla siddhīsa nēīlaca sōḍaṇāra nāhīṃ; maja kōṇahī nalagē āṇīka saṅgātī || rākhāvī bahutī hāla mājhī ||. 2 A wager, an engagement upon a stake: also an engagement without stake; a fixed engagement. v bāndha with śīṃ. Hence, by implication, Vieing with; emulously engaging with. v bāndha.

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hāla (हाल).—ad ( A) Now. 2 Continually, constantly, at every present moment. This sense is rare. Pr. hāla khuśāmata tājī rōṭī or tājā rōjagāra Standing flattery, ready at the instant, secures good pudding or a maintenance fresh and fat. hāla khuśāmatī also occurs as a Ever ready with flattery fresh and new. See under khuśāmada.

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hāḷa (हाळ).—f A basket of a certain form and size. Hence (quasi basketing and marketing) Going with things for sale in another village; or going about from village to village with pedler's ware; pedlering. 2 Pedler's ware: also the produce of the sale of pedler's ware; as hāḷīsa jāṇēṃ -cālaṇēṃ -nighaṇēṃ. 3 The mark (in clearing ground for cultivation) of a removed or an extinct tree.

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hāḷa (हाळ).—m A watering trough (esp. of masonry) for cattle. 2 A long and deep furrow or channel: also a long fireplace or a line of fireplaces. On the day of campāṣaṣṭhī fire is kindled in a hāḷa or trench, and people (i. e. the yajurvēdī and others) walk along the embers, when they celebrate gōndhaḷa in honor of dēvī, khaṇḍōbā &c. 3 As a Canarese word hāḷa signifies Mountain-torrent or a rude stream; also its precipitous or rugged bed.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

hala (हल).—m A plough.

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haḷa (हळ).—f A blast of hot air. m A long trench. A plough.

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hāla (हाल).—m Distressful condition; woeful- ness. tyācē hāla kutrēṃ khāīnā He was reduced to extreme wretchedness. f Fixed resolution ad Now.

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hāḷa (हाळ).—m A watering trough for cattle. A long fireplace. f A basket of a certain form. Peddler's ware.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Hala in Sanskrit glossaries]

Hala (हल).—

1) A plough.

2) A weapon.

3) A landmeasure.

Derivable forms: halaḥ (हलः), halam (हलम्).

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Hala (हल).—[hal ghañarthe karaṇe ka]

1) A plough; वहसि वपुषि विशदे वसनं जलदाभम् । हलहतिभीतिमिलितयमुनाभम् (vahasi vapuṣi viśade vasanaṃ jaladābham | halahatibhītimilitayamunābham); or हलं कलयते (halaṃ kalayate) Gīt.1.

2) Deformity, ugliness; ततो मया रूपगुणैरहल्या स्त्री विनिर्मिता । हलं नामेह वैरूप्यं हल्यं तत्प्रभवं भवेत् (tato mayā rūpaguṇairahalyā strī vinirmitā | halaṃ nāmeha vairūpyaṃ halyaṃ tatprabhavaṃ bhavet) || Rām.7.3. 22.

3) Hindrance.

4) Quarrel.

Derivable forms: halam (हलम्).

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Halā (हला).—

1) A female friend.

2) The earth.

3) Water.

4) Spirituous liquor. -ind. A vocative particle used in addressing a female friend; (only in theatrical language); हला शकुन्तले अत्रैव तावन्मुहूर्त तिष्ठ (halā śakuntale atraiva tāvanmuhūrta tiṣṭha) Ś.1; cf. हण्डा (haṇḍā) also.

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Hāla (हाल).—[halo astyasya aṇ, hala eva vā aṇ]

1) A plough.

2) Name of Balarāma.

3) Name of a king, Śālivāhana king.

4) A kind of bird.

-lā Spirituous liquor.

-lī A wife's younger sister.

Derivable forms: hālaḥ (हालः).

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Hālā (हाला).—Wine, spirituous liquor; हित्वा हालामभिमतरसां रेवतीलोचनाङ्काम् (hitvā hālāmabhimatarasāṃ revatīlocanāṅkām) Me.51; Pt.1.58; Śi.1.21; हालया साकमज्ञातं हालाहलमदापयत् (hālayā sākamajñātaṃ hālāhalamadāpayat) Śiva. B.28.21.

See also (synonyms): hālahalī.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 62 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Halayudha
Halāyudha (हलायुध) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, ...
Haladhara
Haladhara (हलधर).—A synonym of Balarāma. (See under Balabhadrarāma).
Hala Apada
hala apadā (हल अपदा).—or -āpadā & hala apēṣṭā Preferably hāla apadā &c.
Halabhriti
Halabhṛti (हलभृति).—f. ploughing, agriculture, husbandry. Derivable forms: halabhṛtiḥ (हलभृतिः)...
Halamukha
Halamukha (हलमुख).—a ploughshare, Derivable forms: halamukham (हलमुखम्).Halamukha is a Sanskrit...
Halasana
Halāsana (हलासन, “plow posture”) is a Sanskrit word referring to a type of posture (āsana) u...
Halahati
Halahati (हलहति).—f. 1) striking or drawing along with a plough. 2) ploughing.Halahati is a San...
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Halasīra (हलसीर).—a ploughshare. Derivable forms: halasīraḥ (हलसीरः).Halasīra is a Sanskrit com...
Parshvahalasana
Pārśvahalāsana (पार्श्वहलासन, “side plow posture”) is a Sanskrit word referring to a type of...
Halagolaka
Halagolaka (हलगोलक).—a kind of insect; फलं वा मूलकं हृत्वा अपूपं वा पिपीलिकाः । चोरयित्वा च निष...
Halabha
Halābha (हलाभ).—a piebald horse. Derivable forms: halābhaḥ (हलाभः).Halābha is a Sanskrit compou...
Halavaha
Halavāhā (हलवाहा).—a particular landmeasure. Halavāhā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the ...
Halabhrit
Halabhṛt (हलभृत्).—m. 1) a ploughman. 2) Name of Balarāma; केशव धृतहलधररूप जय जगदीश हरे (keśava...
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Halakakud (हलककुद्).—f. the projecting beam of the plough. Halakakud is a Sanskrit compound con...
Halabhuti
Halabhūti (हलभूति).—f. ploughing, agriculture, husbandry. Derivable forms: halabhūtiḥ (हलभूतिः)...

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