Haladhara, aka: Hala-dhara; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Haladhara means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

Haladhara (हलधर).—A synonym of Balarāma. (See under Balabhadrarāma).

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia
Purāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Itihāsa (narrative history)

Haladhara (हलधर) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.221.7, I.221, IX.36.12) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Haladhara) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
context information

Itihāsa (इतिहास) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Purāṇas, 2) the Mahābhārata and 3) the Rāmāyaṇa. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smṛti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to śruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

General definition (in Hinduism)

Haladhara (हलधर) refers to the eighth of ten avatars (daśāvatāra) of Lord Viṣṇu corresponding to Balarāma, as described by Vāsudeva in his Vṛttagajendramokṣa verse 111. All the incarnations have been described with their respective contexts in 10 different verses in 10 different metres; Haladhara has been described in the Jhaladharamālā metre.

(Source): Shodhganga: a concise history of Sanskrit Chanda literature (h)

In Buddhism

Mahāsāṃghika (school of early Buddhism)

Haladhara (हलधर) is the name of a Buddha under whom Śākyamuni (or Gautama, ‘the historical Buddha’) acquired merit along the first through nine bhūmis, according to the Mahāvastu. There are in total ten bhūmis representing the ten stages of the Bodhisattva’s path towards enlightenment.

Haladhara is but one among the 500 Buddhas enumerated in the Mahāvastu during a conversation between Mahākātyāyana and Mahākāśyapa, both principle disciples of Gautama Buddha. The Mahāvastu is an important text of the Lokottaravāda school of buddhism, dating from the 2nd century BCE.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Lokottaravāda
context information

The Mahāsāṃghika (महासांघिक, mahasanghika) is an early school of Buddhism which split into three sub-schools: the Lokottaravāda, the Ekavyāvahārika and the Kukkuṭika. It is commonly seen as an important foundation for the development of Mahāyāna Buddhism.

Relevant definitions

Search found 533 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shridhara
Śrīdhara (श्रीधर).—A king who lived in Tretāyuga. (For more information see under Varatanu).
Hala
Hala (हल) or Halāgama refers to one of upāgamas (supplementary scriptures) of the Vīrāgama whic...
Mahidhara
Mahīdhara (महीधर) is the name of a minister of King Candraprabha according to appendix 6 a...
Dhara
Dharā (धरा).—1. Base of a triangle. 2. Earth. Note: Dharā is a Sanskrit technical term used in ...
Vidyadhara
Vidyādhāra (विद्याधार) refers to one of the 130 varṇavṛttas (syllabo-quantitative verse) dealt ...
Yashodhara
Yaśodharā (यशोधरा) is one of the two wifes of the Buddha according to the Mahāprajñāpāramitāśās...
Tuladhara
Tulādhāra (तुलाधार).—A charitable and righteous Vaiśya who lived in Kāśī. He gave the sage Jāja...
Payodhara
Payodhara (पयोधर) refers to one of the 23 types of dohā metres (a part of mātrā type) described...
Gangadhara
1) Gaṅgādhara (गङ्गाधर) or Gaṅgādharamūrti refers to one of the eighteen forms (mūrti) of Śiva ...
Durdhara
Durdhara (दुर्धर).—a. 1) irresistible, difficult to be stopped. 2) difficult to be borne or suf...
Jatadhara
Jatādhara (जताधर).—A warrior of Subrahmaṇya. (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 45, Verse 61).
Karnadhara
Karṇadhāra (कर्णधार).—a helmsman, a pilot; अकर्णधारा जलधौ विप्लवेतेह नौरिव (akarṇadhārā jaladha...
Bhudhara
Bhūdhara (भूधर).—a. 1) holding or supporting the earth; व्यादिश्यते भूधरतामवेक्ष्य कृष्णेन देहो...
Dandadhara
Daṇḍadhara (दण्डधर) or Daṇḍadharāgama refers to one of upāgamas (supplementary scriptures) of t...
Vasudhara
Vasudhārā (वसुधारा) refers to the name of a Tīrtha (pilgrim’s destination) mentioned in the Ma...

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