Ganapati, aka: Gaṇapati, Gana-pati; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Ganapati means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Ganapati in Purana glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gaṇapati (गणपति).—Genealogy. A son of Śiva with face like that of an elephant. As Śiva has appointed this son as chief of the gaṇas (attendants) he is called Gaṇapati. (See full article at Story of Gaṇapati from the Puranic encyclopaedia by Vettam Mani)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Gaṇapati (गणपति).—Also Gaṇeśa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 41. 41.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of ganapati in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Ganapati in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gaṇapati, commonly known as Gaṇeśa is said to be the leader of a class or troop or assemblage of gaṇa-s, who are explained as troops or classes of inferior deities. Each of them attends to one work of creation and sustenance. Hence they are also called inferior deities. Gaṇapati, who is the leader of such gaṇa-s is invoked before commencing any auspicious things.

Source: Manblunder: Sri Rudram 4.1-6
Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Discover the meaning of ganapati in the context of Shaivism from relevant books on Exotic India

General definition (in Hinduism)

Ganapati in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gaṇapati (गणपति): Lord of the territory, The fulfiller of desire, the god of merchants, Second son of Shiva and Pārvati. Scourge of Carpathia and the Sorrow of Moldavia. Amanuensis of Vyasa who agreed to write down without pause or hesitation the story of the Mahabharata dictated by Vyasa.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

India history and geogprahy

Gaṇapati (गणपति) is an example of a Śaivite name mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. Classification of personal names according to deities (eg., from Śaivism) were sometimes used by more than one person and somehow seem to have been popular. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. Derivation of personal names (eg., Gaṇapati) during the rule of the Guptas followed patterns such as tribes, places, rivers and mountains.

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Gaṇapati is one of the Brāhmaṇa donees mentioned in the “Asankhali plates of Narasiṃha II” (1302 A.D.). When a grant was made to a large number of Brāhmaṇas, the chief amongst the donees seems to have been called Pānīyagrāhin especially. In the present record, though all the donees (eg., Gaṇapati) are referred to as Pāṇigrāhi-mahājana, their list is headed by a Brāhmaṇa with Pāṇigrahī as his surname.

These copper plates (mentioning Gaṇapati) were discovered from the house of a Santal inhabitant of Pargana Asankhali in the Mayurbhanj State (Orissa). It was made when king Vīra-Narasiṃhadeva was staying at the Bhairavapura-kaṭaka (city, camp or residence).

Source: What is India: Epigraphia Indica volume XXXI (1955-56)
India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Discover the meaning of ganapati in the context of India history from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Ganapati in Marathi glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

gaṇapati (गणपति).—m (S) The deity gaṇēśa q. v. 2 At the sugarpress. A quantity of gūḷa set apart in the name of gaṇapati on the pouring of the gūḷa out of the boiler. This is the hakka or due of the gurava. Hence applied to the stone which the purchaser of gūḷa throws into the scale having the weights. gaṇapatīcēṃ kēlēṃ She has conceived. gaṇapatīcēṃ jhālēṃ (There is some of Gan̤pati's work.) Some woman has conceived. gaṇapatīcēṃ nāṃva ghēṇēṃ To make a beginning.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of ganapati in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Ganapati in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [G] · next »

Gaṇapati (गणपति).—

1) Name of Śiva.

2) Name of Gaṇeśa. [He is the son of Śiva and Pārvatī, or of Pārvatī only; for according to one legend, he sprang from the scurf of her body. He is the god of wisdom and remover of obstacles; hence he is invoked and worshipped at the commencement of every important undertaking. He is usually represented in a sitting posture, short and fat, with a protuberant belly, and four hands; riding a mouse; and with the head of an elephant. This head has only one tusk, the other having been lost in a scuffle between him and Paraśurāma when he opposed the latter's entrance to Śiva's inner apartments; (whence he is called Ekadanta, Ekadaṃṣṭra &c.). There are several legends accounting for his elephant head. It is said that he wrote the Mahābhārata at the dictation of Vyāsa who secured his services as a scribe from the god Brahman].

3) also an epithet of Bṛhaspati and Indra.

4) the leader of a class or troop.

Derivable forms: gaṇapatiḥ (गणपतिः).

Gaṇapati is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms gaṇa and pati (पति). See also (synonyms): gaṇapa.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of ganapati in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Relevant definitions

Search found 1456 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Gana
Gaṇā (गणा).—A female attendant of Skanda. (Śalya Parva, Chapter 46, Verse 3).
Ganesha
Gaṇeśa (गणेश) is the name of an ancient Tibetan tantric deity.—The Newari people of Nepal worsh...
Prajapati
Prajāpati (प्रजापति) is the name of a deity who received the Vīrāgama from Tejas through the ma...
Senapati
Senāpati (सेनापति).—1) a general. 2) Name of Śiva. 3) Name of Kārtikeya. 4) A leader of ten पत्...
Pashupati
Paśūpati (पशूपति) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIV.8) and represents one of the...
Grihapati
Gṛhapati (गृहपति).—m. (-tiḥ) 1. A house. holder, a man of the second class, or who after having...
Ashvapati
Āsvapati (आस्वपति).—(*), nowhere recorded except in BHS ppp. āsupta, and caus. adj. or nom. act...
Pati
Patī (पती) refers to a “hero married to a woman” and represents one of the three kinds of “hero...
Gananatha
Gaṇanātha (गणनाथ) is an epithet of both Śiva and Gaṇeśa, as mentioned in the Śivapurāṇa-māhātmy...
Devagana
Devagaṇa (देवगण).—See Manvantara.
Gopati
Gopati (गोपति) is the name of a deity who received the Cintyāgama from Sudīpta through the mahā...
Bhagana
Bhagaṇa.—(IA 19), a bangle. Note: bhagaṇa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as i...
Gunagana
Guṇagaṇa (गुणगण).—m., also nt., reckoning, counting, cal- culation of virtues; avoidance of thi...
Umapati
Umāpati (उमापति) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. XIV.8) and represents one of the ...
Gajapati
Gajapati.—(IE 8-2; EI 9, 30; CII 4; HD), ‘the lord of elephants’; officer in charge of the elep...

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: