Devadaru, aka: Devadāru, Deva-daru; 10 Definition(s)

Introduction

Devadaru means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Devadaru in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Devadāru (देवदारु) is a Sanskrit word referring to Cedrus deodara (Himalayan cedar), from the Pinaceae family. It is classified as a medicinal plant in the system of Āyurveda (science of Indian medicine) and is used throughout literature such as the Suśrutasaṃhita and the Carakasaṃhitā. It is native to the western Himalayas and the Indian subcontinent. It is worshiped as a divine tree among the Hindus and has several legends related to it. It is composed of the Sanskrit words deva (divine) and dāru (tree).

According to the Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 12.28), Himalayan cedar (devadāru) has the following synonyms: Amaradāru, Bhadradāru, Bhadraka, Pītadāru, Bhavadāru, Śivadāru, Suradāru, Snigdhadāru, Dāru, Dāruka, Indradru, Kilima, Pāribhadra, Tridaśāhva, Bhūtahārin, Śāmbhava, Surāhva and Surāhvaya.

According to the Mādhavacikitsā (7th-century Āyurvedic work), the plant (Devadāru) is mentioned as a medicine used for the treatment of all major fevers, as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) chapter. In this work, the plant has the following synonyms: Dāru, Amara, Devakāṣṭha, Suradāra, Surataru and Surā.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Devadāru (देवदारु).—The Sanskrit name for an important Āyurvedic drug.—It grows in Himālayan region as if nurtured by the breast-milk of the goddess Pārvatī. The wood of the plant is light, bitter, hot and alleviates vātika disorders and prameha.

Source: Google Books: Essentials of Ayurveda
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Devadāru (देवदारु) is a Sanskrit word, identified with Pinus longifolia (chir pine) by various scholars in their translation of the Śukranīti. This tree is mentioned as having thorns, and should therefore be considered as wild. The King shoud place such trees in forests (not in or near villages). He should nourish them by stoole of goats, sheep and cows, water as well as meat. Note that Pinus longifolia is a synonym of Pinus roxburghii.

The following is an ancient Indian horticultural recipe for the nourishment of such trees:

According to Śukranīti 4.4.110-112: “The powder of the dungs of goats and sheep, the powder of Yava (barley), Tila (seeds), beef as well as water should be kept together (undisturbed) for seven nights. The application of this water leads very much to the growth in flowers and fruits of all trees (such as devadāru).”

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Devadaru in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Devadāru (देवदारु) is the name of a tree found in maṇidvīpa (Śakti’s abode), according to the Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa 12.10. Accordingly, these trees always bear flowers, fruits and new leaves, and the sweet fragrance of their scent is spread across all the quarters in this place. The trees (eg. Devadāru) attract bees and birds of various species and rivers are seen flowing through their forests carrying many juicy liquids. Maṇidvīpa is defined as the home of Devī, built according to her will. It is compared with Sarvaloka, as it is superior to all other lokas.

The Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa, or Śrīmad-devī-bhāgavatam, is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, a type of Sanskrit literature containing cultural information on ancient India, religious/spiritual prescriptions and a range of topics concerning the various arts and sciences. The whole text is composed of 18,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 6th century.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śrīmad Devī Bhāgavatam
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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India history and geogprahy

Devadaru or Daru is the name of a tree mentioned in the Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva (10th century A.D).—Daru refers to the “timber-tree” and its forests are mentioned.

Somadeva mentions many rich forests, gardens, various trees (eg., Devadaru), creepers medicinal and flowering plants and fruit-bearing trees in the Kathasaritsagara. Travel through the thick, high, impregnable and extensive Vindhya forest is a typical feature of many travel-stories. Somadeva’s writing more or less reflects the life of the people of Northern India during the 11th century. His Kathasaritsagara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Devadaru, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravahanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyadharas (celestial beings).

Source: Shodhganga: Cultural history as g leaned from kathasaritsagara
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Devadaru in Pali glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

devadāru : (m.) a kind of pine, Uvaria longifolia.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Devadaru in Marathi glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

dēvadārū (देवदारू).—m n (S) pop. dēvadāra m A species of Pine, Pinus Devadaru. In Bengal it is applied to the Uvaria longifolia; and in the Peninsula to Erythroxylon sideroxylloides; and, commonly, to deal or fir-wood.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

dēvadāru (देवदारु).—m n dēvadarā m A species of Pine, Pinus Devadaru.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Devadaru in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [D] · next »

Devadāru (देवदारु).—m., n. a species of pine; गङ्गाप्रवाहोक्षित- देवदारु (gaṅgāpravāhokṣita- devadāru) Ku.1.54; R.2.36.

Devadāru is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms deva and dāru (दारु).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Devadāru (देवदारु).—mn. (-ruḥ-ru) A species of pine, (Pinus devadaru;) in Bengal it is usually applied to the Uvaria longifolia, and in the Peninsula to another tree, (Erythroxylon sideroxylloides.) E. deva a deity, and dāru timber.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 1503 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

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Devadatta
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Sahadeva
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Baladeva
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Daru
Dāru (दारु).—mfn. (-ruḥ-rvī-ru) 1. Liberal, munificent, a giver, a donor. 2. An artist. 3. Tear...
Devaduta
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Naradeva
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