Vitata, Vitatā: 17 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Vitata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Vitat.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Vitata (वितत, “spread-up”) refers to one of the five types of flower-garlands (mālya), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 23. Mālya represents one of the four types of alaṃkāra, or “decorations”, which in turn is a category of nepathya, or “costumes and make-up”, the perfection of which forms the main concern of the Āhāryābhinaya, or “extraneous representation”, a critical component for a successful dramatic play.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of Natyashastra from relevant books on Exotic India

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Kamakoti Mandali: The Yoginis of Narasimha Vyuha

Vitatā (वितता) is the name of a Mātṛkā-Śakti created by Mahārudra in order to control the plague of demons created by Andhakāsura.—Accordingly, Andhaka-Asura tried to kidnap Umā (Devī Pārvatī), and was fiercely attacked by Mahārudra who shot arrows at him from his mahāpināka. when the arrows pierced the body of Andhakāsura, drops of blood fell to earth and from those drops, thousands of Andhakas arose. To control this plague of demons, Mahārudra created Mātṛkā-Śaktis [viz., Vitatā] and ordered them to drink the blood of the demons and drain them dry.

Source: Kamakoti Mandali: Nrisimha matrika-mandala

1) Vitatā (वितता) refers to one of the various Mātṛkā-Śaktis created by Rudra in order to destroy the clones that spawned from Andhaka’s body.—Accordingly, [...] Andhakāsura attempted to abduct Girājanandinī (Pārvatī) and thus ensued a fierce battle between Andhakāsura and the great Rudra, the Lord of Umā. Like raktabīja, every drop of blood that fell from the body of Andhaka created another Asura like him and in no time, the entire world was filled with Andhakas. To destroy the growing number of Andhakas, Rudra created innumerable Mātṛkā-Śaktis [viz., Vitatā]. These Śaktis of immense power at once began to drink every drop of blood that flowed from the body of Andhaka, but they could still not effectively contain the emergence of more and more demons.

2) Vitatā (वितता) refers to one of the various Mātṛkā-Śaktis created by Rudra in order to destroy the clones that spawned from Andhaka’s body.—Accordingly, [...] Andhakāsura attempted to abduct Girājanandinī (Pārvatī) and thus ensued a fierce battle between Andhakāsura and the great Rudra, the Lord of Umā. Like raktabīja, every drop of blood that fell from the body of Andhaka created another Asura like him and in no time, the entire world was filled with Andhakas. To destroy the growing number of Andhakas, Rudra created innumerable Mātṛkā-Śaktis [viz., Vitatā]. These Śaktis of immense power at once began to drink every drop of blood that flowed from the body of Andhaka, but they could still not effectively contain the emergence of more and more demons.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of Shaktism from relevant books on Exotic India

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 5: The category of the non-living

Vitata (वितत) refers to one of the four types of contrived sound (prāyogika) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 5.24.—What is the meaning of vitata sound? It is the sound produced by stringed musical instruments e.g. violin, vīṇā etc.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of General definition from relevant books on Exotic India

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vitata : (pp. of vitanoti) stretched; extended; diffused.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Vitata, (pp. of vitanoti) stretched, extended, diffused S. I, 207; Sn. 272, 669 (v. l. vitthata); J. I, 356 (tanta° where the strings were stretched); Miln. 102, 307; Mhvs 17, 31 (vallīhi v.) — nt. vitata a drum (with leather on both sides) VvA. 37. (Page 620)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of Pali from relevant books on Exotic India

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vitata (वितत).—p S Stretched, spread, expanded, extended.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of Marathi from relevant books on Exotic India

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vitata (वितत).—p. p.

1) Spread out, extended, stretched; अमुं यज्ञं विततमेयाय (amuṃ yajñaṃ vitatameyāya) Ch. Up.1.1.7.

2) Elongated, large, long, broad; विततवपुषा महाहिना (vitatavapuṣā mahāhinā) Ki.12.22; भवति वितत- श्वासोन्नाहप्रणुन्नपयोधरम् (bhavati vitata- śvāsonnāhapraṇunnapayodharam) Māl.1.15.

3) Performed, accomplished, effected; विततयज्ञः (vitatayajñaḥ) Ś.7.34.

4) Covered.

5) Diffused.

6) Gone away; शब्दवेध्यं च विततम् (śabdavedhyaṃ ca vitatam) Rām 1.5. 2.

7) Drawn (as a bow string).

8) Bent (as a bow); (see tan with vi).

-tam 1 Any stringed instrument, such as a lute &c.

2) A shoot, tendril (pratāna); विचिताश्च महागुल्मा लताविततसंतताः (vicitāśca mahāgulmā latāvitatasaṃtatāḥ) Rām.4.47.12.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vitata (वितत).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Stretched, spread, expanded. 2. Pervaded, diffused. 3. Lengthened. 4. Large, broad. 5. Covered. 6. Performed. n.

(-taṃ) Any stringed instrument. E. vi before, tata stretched.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vitata (वितत).—[adjective] spread out, extended, covered with ([instrumental] or —°); extensive, broad, wide, [neuter] [adverb]; [abstract] tva† [neuter] extent.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vitata (वितत):—[=vi-tata] a etc. See below.

2) [=vi-tata] [from vi-tan] b mfn. spread out, extended etc.

3) [v.s. ...] diffused, drawn (as a bow-string), [Ṛg-veda]

4) [v.s. ...] bent (as a bow), [Rāmāyaṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] covered, filled, [Harivaṃśa]

6) [v.s. ...] prepared (as a road), [Atharva-veda]

7) [v.s. ...] extensive, far-spreading, broad, wide (am ind.), [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā] etc. etc.

8) [v.s. ...] n. any stringed instrument (such as a lute etc.), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vitata (वितत):—[(taḥ-tā-taṃ) a.] Stretched; pervaded; lengthened. n. Any stringed instrument.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vitata (वितत) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Viaṇiya, Viaya, Vitata.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vitata in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of Sanskrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Vitata (वितत) [Also spelled vitat]:—(a) spread out, extended; drawn (as a bow-string); hence [vitati] (nf).

context information

...

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of Hindi from relevant books on Exotic India

Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Vitata (वितत) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Vitata.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of Prakrit from relevant books on Exotic India

Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Vitata (ವಿತತ):—

1) [adjective] spread out; extended; diffused.

2) [adjective] good; excellent.

3) [adjective] prepared; readied; made.

--- OR ---

Vitata (ವಿತತ):—[noun] any stringed instrument.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

Discover the meaning of vitata in the context of Kannada from relevant books on Exotic India

See also (Relevant definitions)

Relevant text

Like what you read? Consider supporting this website: