Kunthanatha, Kunthanātha, Kuntha-natha: 1 definition

Introduction

Introduction:

Kunthanatha means something in Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Kunthanatha in Jainism glossary
Source: archive.org: The Jaina Iconography

Kunthanātha (कुन्थनाथ) refers to the seventeenth of twenty-four Tīrthaṃkaras or Jinas, commonly depicted in Jaina iconography.—Jaina tradition as preserved in their literature, has always connected the symbol of a goat with this Tīrthaṃkara. He has as his Yakṣa Gandharva and Yakṣiṇī Balā (Digambara: Vijayā). The contemporary King, who carries his Chowrie-bearer is called Kuṇāla. The tree selected by him to sit under for attaining the Kevala knowledge is Tilaka-taru.

His parent’s names, as may be gathered from the jaina Purāṇas, are variously called Śūrasena, Sūrya, Śivarāja (Śvetāmbara version) for the father, Śrīkāntā or Śrīdevī for the mother. His father belonged to the Kuru race, and Hastināpura as his capital, where the Jina was born. He, like his predecessor, became an emperor. Two explanations of the origin of his name are given in the Abhidhāna Cintāmaṇi. First the Jina stood firmly on earth hence Kunthanātha. Secondly, before his birth, his mother saw a heap (Kuntha) of jewels.

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context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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