Shakhi, Sakhi, Sakhī, Śākhi, Śākhin, Shakhin: 31 definitions

Introduction:

Shakhi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śākhi and Śākhin can be transliterated into English as Sakhi or Shakhi or Sakhin or Shakhin, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sakhī (सखी) refers to “(female) friends”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.6.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] Menā bore the characteristic signs of pregnancy which almost indicated the imminent rise in pleasure of her lord and served as the auspicious cause for the future bliss of the gods. [...] Kissing her face, emitting the fragrance of the earth in the course of his secret dalliance, the lord of the mountains, was not satiated. His love increased. The lord of mountains asked Menā’s friends [i.e., sakhī] frequently—‘What are the desires of Menā? She herself does not express them out of bashfulness’. [...]”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Śākhi (शाखि).—Parents of Māriṣā, mother of Dakṣa in Cākṣuṣaantara.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 13. 70; Vāyu-purāṇa 30. 61.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Śākhi (शाखि) refers to a “tree”, as mentioned in a list of twenty-five synonyms in the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). The Dharaṇyādi-varga covers the lands, soil, mountains, jungles and vegetation’s relations between trees [viz., Śākhi] and plants and substances, with their various kinds.

Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Shakhin [शाखिन्] in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Salvadora persica L. from the Salvadoraceae (Salvadora) family. For the possible medicinal usage of shakhin, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhajana-rahasya - 2nd Edition

Sakhī (सखी) refers to:—A female friend, companion or attendant. Śrīmatī Rādhikā has five kinds of sakhīs: (1) Sakhī–Daniṣṭhā is an example. These sakhīs love and serve both Śrīmatī Rādhikā and Śrī Kṛṣṇa, but they are slightly more inclined towards Śrī Kṛṣṇa. (2) Nitya-sakhīs and (3) prāṇa-sakhīs–the only two kinds of sakhīs who are in the category of mañjarīs. These sakhīs serve both Śrī Rādhā and Śrī Kṛṣṇa, with a tendency to favour Śrīmatī Rādhikā. The prāṇa-sakhīs, like Rūpa Mañjarī and Rati Mañjarī, being even more intimately connected with Śrīmatī, are naturally the leaders of the nitya-sakhīs. (4) Priya-sakhīs and (5) priya-narmasakhīs–Lalitā and Viśākhā are examples. (cf. Glossary page from Bhajana-Rahasya).

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (vaishnavism)

Śākhī (शाखी) refers to a “tree”, according to the Vedānta Deśika’s Yatirājasaptati.—When we come to the poem’s understanding of the divinity of Rāmānuja we find a wide spectrum of meanings. [...] Verse 28 is particularly eloquent in describing and encapsulating all his nurturing and protecting qualities, which are compared to those present everywhere in nature itself—as the mountain from which originate all the streams of knowledge, the tree (śākhī) under which the weary traveler wandering in saṃsāra takes rest, the rising sun that keeps the illusionary darkness of those with distorted views at bay and the full moon that brings to high tide the ocean of the Vedas.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Śākhī (शाखी) refers to one of the sacred trees mentioned in the Kaulāvalinirṇaya.—Trees, forests and groves close to human settlements have been venerated throughout the subcontinent up to the present day as the abodes of deities and a range of supernatural beings. [...] In the Kaula and related Tantras, such beings came to be identified with Yoginīs and so the trees they inhabited as Yakṣinīs came to be venerated as Kula trees (kulavṛkṣa) in which Yoginīs reside. The Kaulāvalinirṇaya enjoins that the adept should bow to the Kula and the Lord of Kula when he sees one of these trees [i.e., Śākhī] and recollect that Yoginīs reside in them.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Śākhin (शाखिन्) refers to “trees”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 15) (“On the nakṣatras—‘asterisms’”), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “Those who are born on the lunar day of Svātī will delight in keeping birds, deer, horses; will be grain merchants; dealers in beans; of weak friendship; weak, of abstemious habits and skilled tradesmen. Those who are born on the lunar day of Viśākhā will grow trees yielding red flowers and red fruits (rakta-puṣpaphala-śākhin); be dealers in gingelly seeds, beans, cotton, black gram and chick peas and worshippers of Indra and Agni. [...]”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Sakhi (सखि) refers to a “ritual assistant”, according to the Kiraṇatantra chapter 49 (dealing with vratacaryā).—Accordingly, “Garuḍa spoke: ‘You have taught me, O great Lord, the activities of the Neophyte, the Putraka and the Ācārya. Tell me those of the Sādhaka’. The Lord spoke: ‘[...] Accompanied by his ritual assistant, he should go to the forest and begin the practice of his religious observance. [If he is] without a ritual assistant, then his spouted water-pot is his ritual assistant (sva-sakhi) in that [practice].’”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sakhi : (m.) a friend. || sākhī (m.), a tree.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Sakhi, (Vedic sakhi m. & f. ) a companion, friend; Nom. sakhā J. II, 29; 348; Acc. sakhāraṃ J. II, 348; V, 509; & sakhaṃ J. II, 299; Instr. sakhinā J. IV, 41; Abl. sakhārasmā J. III, 534; Gen. sakhino J. VI, 478; Voc. sakhā J. III, 295; Nom. pl. sakhā J. III, 323; & sakhāro J. III, 492; Gen. sakhīnaṃ J. III, 492; IV, 42; & sakhānaṃ J. II, 228. In compn with bhū as sakhi° & sakhī°, e.g. sakhibhāva friendship J. VI, 424; PvA. 241; & sakhībhāva J. III, 493. (Page 661)

— or —

Sakhī, (f.) (to sakhi) a female friend J. II, 27, 348. (Page 661)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Śākhī (शाखी).—a (S) Branched, having branches, lit. fig.

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sakhī (सखी).—f (S) A female friend or companion, a confidante. 2 One of the obscene verses com- posed to be sung at the Shimga and on similar occasions. 3 A kind of introductory shlok to the love-song called lāvaṇī.

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sākhī (साखी).—f (Better sākha) Mercantile credit: also good repute.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Śākhī (शाखी).—a Branched, having branches.

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sakhī (सखी).—f A female friend, a confidante sagāsōyarā.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śākhin (शाखिन्).—a. [śākhā astyasya ini]

1) Having branches (fig. also).

2) Branching, ramifying.

3) Belonging to any branch or school (as of the Veda). -m.

1) A tree; कुल्याम्भोभिः पवनचपलैः शाखिनो धौतमूलाः (kulyāmbhobhiḥ pavanacapalaiḥ śākhino dhautamūlāḥ) Ś.1.15.

2) A Veda.

3) A follower of any Vedic school or recension.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sakhi (सखि).—m. [saha samānaṃ khyāyate ni° Uṇādi-sūtra 4.136] (nom. sakhā, sakhāyau, sakhāyaḥ; acc. sakhāyam, sakhāyau, sakhyuḥ gen sing.; sakhyau loc. sing.) A friend, companion, an associate; तस्मात् सखा त्वमसि यन्मम तत्तवैव (tasmāt sakhā tvamasi yanmama tattavaiva) Uttararāmacarita 5.1; सखीनिव प्रीतियुजोऽनुजीविनः (sakhīniva prītiyujo'nujīvinaḥ) Ki. 1.1. (At the end of comp. sakhi is changed to sakha; vanitāsakhānām Kumārasambhava 1.1; sacivasakhaḥ R.4.87;1.48;12.9; Bhaṭṭikāvya 1.1.)

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Sakhī (सखी).—A female friend or companion, a lady's maid; नृत्यति युवतिजनेन समं सखि विरहिजनस्य दुरन्ते (nṛtyati yuvatijanena samaṃ sakhi virahijanasya durante) Gītagovinda 1.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śākhin (शाखिन्).—mfn. (-khī-khinī-khi) Branched, branching, having branches. (literally or figuratively.) m. (-khī) 1. A tree. 2. Veda. 3. A follower of any vedic school. 4. An inhabitant of the northern districts bordering on India, a Turk or Tartar. 5. The name of a king. E. śākhā a branch, aff. ini .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sakhi (सखि).—m. (sakhā) 1. A friend. 2. An associate, a companion. f. (-khī) A woman’s female friend or companion, a confidante, &c. E. sa for samāna all, (the world,) khyā to celebrate, aff. in, and ṅīṣ fem. aff.; the masc. noun is irregularly inflected. At the end of compounds sakhi is changed to sakha .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śākhin (शाखिन्).—i. e. śākhā + in, I. adj., f. , Having branches, branched, literally and figuratively. Ii. m. 1. A tree, Böhtl. Ind. Spr. 187. 2. A Veda.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sakhi (सखि).—i. e. probably sa- 1. kṣi, I. m. 1. An associate, [Pañcatantra] iii. [distich] 56; a companion, 265, 3. 2. A friend, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] 12, 1. Ii. f. khī, A female friend, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] 8, 2; [Pañcatantra] 258, 9.

— Cf. [Latin] socius.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śākhin (शाखिन्).—[adjective] having branches or schools (Veda); [masculine] tree.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sakhi (सखि).—[masculine] friend, comrade, attendant.

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Sakhī (सखी).—[feminine] female friend or companion.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śākhi (शाखि):—[from śākh] m. [plural] Name of a people (= turuṣka; cf. next), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

2) Sakhi (सखि):—[from sac] m. (strong cases [nominative case] sakhā [plural] sakhāyaḥ; [accusative] sg. sakhāyam; [genitive case] [ablative] sakhyus; other cases regularly from sakhi) a friend, assistant, companion, [Ṛg-veda] etc. etc.

3) [v.s. ...] the husband of the wife’s sister, brother-in-law, [Demetrius Galanos’s Lexiko: sanskritikes, anglikes, hellenikes]

4) Sakhī (सखी):—[from sakhi > sac] a f. See below.

5) Sakhi (सखि):—[from sac] cf. [Latin] socius.

6) Sakhī (सखी):—[from sac] b f. a female friend or companion, a woman’s confidante, [Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

7) [v.s. ...] a mistress, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

8) [v.s. ...] (ifc.) a woman who shares in or sympathizes with, [Kumāra-sambhava]

9) Sākhi (साखि):—m. Name of a people (cf. śākhi), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śākhin (शाखिन्):—[from śākh] mfn. provided with branches, [Yājñavalkya; Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa]

2) [v.s. ...] separated into schools (said of the Veda), [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

3) [v.s. ...] adhering to a [particular] Vedic school, [Manvarthamuktāvalī, kullūka bhaṭṭa’s Commentary on manu-smṛti; Taittirīya-prātiśākhya [Scholiast or Commentator]]

4) [v.s. ...] m. a tree, [Suparṇādhyāya; Mahābhārata; Kāvya literature] etc.

5) [v.s. ...] a Veda which exists in various schools, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] the follower of any Vedic school, [Bādarāyaṇa’s Brahma-sūtra [Scholiast or Commentator]]

7) [v.s. ...] Salvadora Persica, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

8) [v.s. ...] Name of a king, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) [v.s. ...] [plural] Name of a people (= turuṣka; cf. śākhi), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śākhin (शाखिन्):—[(khī-khinī-khi) m.] A tree; a Veda; northern man; name of a king. a. Branching out.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sakhi (सखि):—(khā) 2. m. A friend, companion. f. (ī) Idem; a confidante.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Sakhi (सखि) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Sahi, Sahī.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Śākhin (शाखिन्) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Sāhi.

[Sanskrit to German]

Shakhi in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Sakhī (सखी):—(nf) a (female) friend, (female) companion; —[saṃpradāya] a sect of Vaishnavas wherein the devotee considers himself to be his deity’s spouse; hence —[bhāva] this type of devotion.

2) (a) bounteous, generous, open-handed; —[se sūma bhalā ko turaṃta de jabāba] he gives twice who gives in a trice.

3) Sākhī (साखी):—(nm) a witness.

context information

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śākhi (ಶಾಖಿ):—[adjective] having branches.

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Śākhi (ಶಾಖಿ):—[noun] a tree (that has a number of branches).

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Sakhi (ಸಖಿ):—[noun] (fem.) an intimate companion; a friend; a confidante.

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Sakhi (ಸಖಿ):—[noun] = ಸಖ [sakha].

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Sakhi (ಸಖಿ):—[noun] a romantic song; a ballad.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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