Padmamudra, Padmamudrā, Padma-mudra: 3 definitions

Introduction:

Padmamudra means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 5

Padmamudrā (पद्ममुद्रा) or simply Padma is the name of a mudrā described in the Īśvarasaṃhitā 24.30.—Accordingly, “the two thumbs are to be closely joined with the other fingers remaining apart. This is pādmī (padma) mudrā offering nourishment and prosperity”. Mūdra (eg., Padmamudrā) is so called as it gives joy to the tattvas in the form of karman for those who offer spotless worship, drive out the defects which move about within and without and sealing up of what is done.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Padmamudra in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Padmamudrā (पद्ममुद्रा) (or Padma) is the name of the gesture (mudrā) associated with Pūrṇagiri, one of the sacred seats (pīṭha), according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Note: Although not all the mantras uttered in the course of a ritual are accompanied by a corresponding gesture, many are, and so are commonly formed (baddha lit. ‘bound’) in quick succession. In this context, the gestures [i.e., padma] are, like the other constituents of the seats, channels through which the deity's energy flows and operates. The goddess, as pure spiritual energy, is herself Mudrā—Gesture.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Padmamudra in Shaivism glossary
Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Padmamudrā (पद्ममुद्रा) is the name of a Mudrā, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 3.17-23, while describing a meditation on Amṛteśa in his form as Mṛtyujit]—“And so now, having constructed the amṛtāmudrā or the padmamudrā, [the mantrin] should meditate on the Ātman. The deity is equal in splendor [to that] of ten million moons, as bright as pellucid pearls, and as magnificent as quartz stone, he resembles drop of cow's milk or jasmine, mountain snow, and is everywhere. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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